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Conservation Reserve Enhancement Program

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NEWS
By JANET HEIM | April 26, 2008
WASHINGTON COUNTY -- When Ann Bowers signed up almost 17 acres of her Broadfording-area farm in 1997 for inclusion in the Conservation Reserve Enhancement Program (CREP), she didn't realize she was a pioneer. It turns out Bowers' enrollment was the first such contract written for the national program in the country. Bowers was assisted in the process by Colleen Cashell, executive director of the Washington County Farm Service Agency. A decade later, acting Agriculture Secretary Chuck Conner announced the enrollment of the 1 millionth acre at a Jan. 17 ceremony at USDA headquarters in Washington, D.C. Bowers attended with Cashell and was honored for signing up the first acre.
NEWS
By SCOTT BUTKI | August 10, 2000
Farm program's acreage may increase Enhancements announced Thursday to a state program to take environmentally sensitive farmland out of production are projected to increase Washington County involvement by up to 50 percent, said Elmer Weibley, district manager for the Washington County Soil Conservation District. continued About 500 to 600 acres of farmland in the county are already in the program, Weibley said. Under new changes they are expecting that amount to increase by 200 to 300 acres within one year, he said.
NEWS
By LAURA ERNDE | February 17, 2000
ANNAPOLIS - Maryland Gov. Parris Glendening offered a $10 million incentive Thursday to encourage farmers to take environmentally sensitive farmland out of production. Under the federal Conservation Reserve Enhancement Program, farmers get paid to protect wetlands and areas around streams and rivers. They can also get reimbursed for the costs of putting up fences and planting buffers next to streams. "It's a very attractive thing," said Elmer Weibley, district manager for the Washington County Soil Conservation District.
NEWS
December 21, 2004
ANNAPOLIS - Maryland and the District of Columbia have received $248,600 from the 2002 Farm Bill to restore wildlife habitat through the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Wildlife Habitat Incentives Program, a Maryland official said. Landowners interested in applying for funding through WHIP should immediately contact their local Natural Resources Conservation Service or Soil Conservation District office in USDA Service Centers, said David Doss, state conservationist. Applications will be ranked to determine which offer the most wildlife habitat benefits.
NEWS
June 30, 2004
Maryland and the U.S. Department of Agriculture have agreed to extend and enhance the Conservation Reserve Enhancement Program through 2007, said Colleen Cashell, director of the Washington County office of USDA's Farm Service Agency . This partnership, formed in 1997, will allow Maryland to continue the process of enrolling up to 100,000 acres of environmentally sensitive land along streams and rivers to be set aside and maintained to protect water...
NEWS
August 14, 2000
Meyers appointed to Soil Conservation Committee By SCOTT BUTKI / Staff Writer Betty J. Meyers of Sharpsburg has been appointed Western Maryland representative of the State Soil Conservation Committee. One of her goals is let people know how state policies affect farmers. "I hope to make the general public more aware of the farmers' plight in the nutrient management program," she said. State law requires farmers to develop nutrient management plans designed to minimize the amount of pollution that ends up in the groundwater.
NEWS
August 31, 2004
The Farm Service Agency in Washington County is offering early re-enrollments in the Conservation Reserve Program and contract extensions for acres that begin expiring in 2007. Colleen Cashell, executive director for FSA in Washington County, also announced that general sign up for CRP began Monday and ends Sept. 24. In three years, 16 million acres under CRP contract will expire. Another 6 million acres will follow in 2008, 4 million in 2009 and 2 million in 2010. Among other issues, USDA is seeking public comment on the following: · How to manage the large acreage set to expire from CRP; · How to manage future CRP sign-ups and acreage; · How to evaluate the program's environmental effectiveness; · How to better utilize information technology such as Geographic Information Systems that evaluate acreage for enrollment; and · How to improve CRP, including the Conservation Reserve Enhancement Program, through partnerships that better address local environmental issues.
NEWS
October 1, 2007
Know a local farmer who deserves to win $10,000? Nominations are now being accepted for American Farmland Trust's 2008 Steward of the Land Award. The annual $10,000 prize honors farmers or ranchers who best exemplify the AFT's mission of halting the loss of productive farmland and promoting farming practices that sustain a healthy environment. Nomination forms can be completed online at www.farmland.org/programs/award/default.asp, or can be printed, completed, and hand mailed to: Steward of the Land Award-American Farmland Trust, 1200 18th Street, NW, Suite 800, Washington, DC 20036.
NEWS
By JANET HEIM | April 27, 2008
WASHINGTON COUNTY - When Ann Bowers signed up almost 17 acres of her Broadfording-area farm in 1997 for inclusion in the Conservation Reserve Enhancement Program (CREP), she didn't realize she was a pioneer. It turns out Bowers' enrollment was the first such contract written for the national program in the country. Bowers was assisted in the process by Colleen Cashell, executive director of the Washington County Farm Service Agency. A decade later, acting Agriculture Secretary Chuck Conner announced the enrollment of the 1 millionth acre at a Jan. 17 ceremony at USDA headquarters in Washington, D.C. Bowers attended with Cashell and was honored for signing up the first acre.
NEWS
March 31, 2001
Program turns idle farmland into wildlife habitat By RICHARD F. BELISLE / Staff Writer MERCERSBURG, Pa. - Pennsylvania was a pheasant hunter's paradise in the 1970s. More than 1 million wild birds were shot across the Keystone State every year. "Pheasant was king," said Brian Brake of Mercersburg. Brake is habitat chairman of the 150-member Cumberland Valley chapter of Pheasants Forever, a sportsmen's lobbying and conservation group whose goal is improving pheasant hunting by improving habitat.
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NEWS
By JANET HEIM | April 27, 2008
WASHINGTON COUNTY - When Ann Bowers signed up almost 17 acres of her Broadfording-area farm in 1997 for inclusion in the Conservation Reserve Enhancement Program (CREP), she didn't realize she was a pioneer. It turns out Bowers' enrollment was the first such contract written for the national program in the country. Bowers was assisted in the process by Colleen Cashell, executive director of the Washington County Farm Service Agency. A decade later, acting Agriculture Secretary Chuck Conner announced the enrollment of the 1 millionth acre at a Jan. 17 ceremony at USDA headquarters in Washington, D.C. Bowers attended with Cashell and was honored for signing up the first acre.
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NEWS
By JANET HEIM | April 26, 2008
WASHINGTON COUNTY -- When Ann Bowers signed up almost 17 acres of her Broadfording-area farm in 1997 for inclusion in the Conservation Reserve Enhancement Program (CREP), she didn't realize she was a pioneer. It turns out Bowers' enrollment was the first such contract written for the national program in the country. Bowers was assisted in the process by Colleen Cashell, executive director of the Washington County Farm Service Agency. A decade later, acting Agriculture Secretary Chuck Conner announced the enrollment of the 1 millionth acre at a Jan. 17 ceremony at USDA headquarters in Washington, D.C. Bowers attended with Cashell and was honored for signing up the first acre.
NEWS
October 1, 2007
Know a local farmer who deserves to win $10,000? Nominations are now being accepted for American Farmland Trust's 2008 Steward of the Land Award. The annual $10,000 prize honors farmers or ranchers who best exemplify the AFT's mission of halting the loss of productive farmland and promoting farming practices that sustain a healthy environment. Nomination forms can be completed online at www.farmland.org/programs/award/default.asp, or can be printed, completed, and hand mailed to: Steward of the Land Award-American Farmland Trust, 1200 18th Street, NW, Suite 800, Washington, DC 20036.
NEWS
December 21, 2004
ANNAPOLIS - Maryland and the District of Columbia have received $248,600 from the 2002 Farm Bill to restore wildlife habitat through the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Wildlife Habitat Incentives Program, a Maryland official said. Landowners interested in applying for funding through WHIP should immediately contact their local Natural Resources Conservation Service or Soil Conservation District office in USDA Service Centers, said David Doss, state conservationist. Applications will be ranked to determine which offer the most wildlife habitat benefits.
NEWS
August 31, 2004
The Farm Service Agency in Washington County is offering early re-enrollments in the Conservation Reserve Program and contract extensions for acres that begin expiring in 2007. Colleen Cashell, executive director for FSA in Washington County, also announced that general sign up for CRP began Monday and ends Sept. 24. In three years, 16 million acres under CRP contract will expire. Another 6 million acres will follow in 2008, 4 million in 2009 and 2 million in 2010. Among other issues, USDA is seeking public comment on the following: · How to manage the large acreage set to expire from CRP; · How to manage future CRP sign-ups and acreage; · How to evaluate the program's environmental effectiveness; · How to better utilize information technology such as Geographic Information Systems that evaluate acreage for enrollment; and · How to improve CRP, including the Conservation Reserve Enhancement Program, through partnerships that better address local environmental issues.
NEWS
June 30, 2004
Maryland and the U.S. Department of Agriculture have agreed to extend and enhance the Conservation Reserve Enhancement Program through 2007, said Colleen Cashell, director of the Washington County office of USDA's Farm Service Agency . This partnership, formed in 1997, will allow Maryland to continue the process of enrolling up to 100,000 acres of environmentally sensitive land along streams and rivers to be set aside and maintained to protect water...
NEWS
July 2, 2003
Trees serve a purpose To the editor: I would like to take this opportunity to respond to several Mail Call entries regarding the tree planting on Eastern Boulevard. The trees were planted due to increased residential development in this area. Developers are required to plant trees when they clear land for development purposes. The tubes are to protect the seedlings from browsing by deer, rabbits, etc. The tubes also act as a greenhouse to give the trees the best chance of survival.
NEWS
March 31, 2001
Program turns idle farmland into wildlife habitat By RICHARD F. BELISLE / Staff Writer MERCERSBURG, Pa. - Pennsylvania was a pheasant hunter's paradise in the 1970s. More than 1 million wild birds were shot across the Keystone State every year. "Pheasant was king," said Brian Brake of Mercersburg. Brake is habitat chairman of the 150-member Cumberland Valley chapter of Pheasants Forever, a sportsmen's lobbying and conservation group whose goal is improving pheasant hunting by improving habitat.
NEWS
August 14, 2000
Meyers appointed to Soil Conservation Committee By SCOTT BUTKI / Staff Writer Betty J. Meyers of Sharpsburg has been appointed Western Maryland representative of the State Soil Conservation Committee. One of her goals is let people know how state policies affect farmers. "I hope to make the general public more aware of the farmers' plight in the nutrient management program," she said. State law requires farmers to develop nutrient management plans designed to minimize the amount of pollution that ends up in the groundwater.
NEWS
By SCOTT BUTKI | August 10, 2000
Farm program's acreage may increase Enhancements announced Thursday to a state program to take environmentally sensitive farmland out of production are projected to increase Washington County involvement by up to 50 percent, said Elmer Weibley, district manager for the Washington County Soil Conservation District. continued About 500 to 600 acres of farmland in the county are already in the program, Weibley said. Under new changes they are expecting that amount to increase by 200 to 300 acres within one year, he said.
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