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NEWS
by GREGORY T. SIMMONS | December 9, 2004
gregs@herald-mail.com HAGERSTOWN - David Leather took a pen and marked a spot on a map for the Hagerstown Planning Commission on Wednesday night. The spot indicated was where his house sits, and it also marked a proposed road. "I have basically one concern, and one concern only, on the drawing," Leather, 43, told the planning board. The proposed road "runs right through my house," he said. Leather's house is on Beverly Drive, and the drawing was of plans for future development, including a residential zoning request and drawings for roads including the proposed Paul Smith Boulevard, or Funkstown Bypass.
NEWS
August 26, 1998
MARTINSBURG, W.Va. - A resident's concerns that a new church on Swan Pond Road will create an unsafe amount of traffic didn't prevent the Berkeley County Planning Commission from granting the project preliminary approval Monday night. The "serpentine" road features two hard curves and obscuring brush near the site where Family Life Church of God plans to construct a 3,600-square-foot church building, Swan Pond Road resident Karl Voss said during a public hearing on the project.
NEWS
October 12, 2000
School bus concern soon to be resolved Bill McKinley, the Washington County Board of Education's director of support services, said Wednesday a resolution to parents concerns regarding the Smithsburg school bus accident on Sept. 25 will be made by Friday. Parents have been complaining that the bus driver drives too fast while picking up and dropping off students and that the Board of Education has not been listening to their concerns.
NEWS
By DAVE McMILLION | August 19, 2008
CHARLES TOWN, W.Va. - A proposed cafe at 103 S. Lawrence St. that would offer beer, sandwiches and video lottery machines raised concerns at a Charles Town City Council meeting Monday night. Council member Geraldine Willingham objected to the appearance of the proposed cafe, saying Charles Town is a historic town and "tinted windows don't belong here. " Timothy Hostler, who is involved in the project, told council members there would only be blinds on the windows. The council forwarded comments made at Monday's meeting to the West Virginia Beverage Control Administration, which must decide whether to grant a license for the cafe to serve beer.
NEWS
July 22, 2006
SHEPHERDSTOWN, W.Va. - Mike Callaghan, Democratic candidate for West Virginia's 2nd District in the U.S. House of Representatives, will attend a fundraiser hosted by the Eastern Panhandle Friends of Mike Callaghan Sunday from 4 to 6 p.m. at the Shepherdstown Train Station. Callaghan is expected to discuss issues of concern for West Virginians, including health care, the environment, Iraq and corruption. Attendees also will have an opportunity to meet Callaghan and discuss issues of concern to them.
OPINION
November 22, 2011
Thanks to those who shared our grief To the editor: The family of Violet A. Kemp, who passed away on Nov. 4, wishes to express their appreciation to all of the doctors and staff who cared for her at local medical facilities. Also to Hospice, especially Tammy, Audrey, Pam, Rose and Carol for their loving and thoughtful care and concern. We also express our gratitude to friends, neighbors, acquaintances, fellow employees and to the Rev. Randy Reid for his many visits and a wonderful service.
NEWS
By LISA PREJEAN | October 5, 2007
Parenting takes on a different dimension as children near the teenage years. When do you hold on? When do you let go? When should you lighten up? When should you be concerned? Parents should be concerned about any activity that is interfering with a teen's ability to function, particularly in three areas - at school, at home and in friendships, says Lisa Boesky, author of "When to Worry: How to Tell If Your Teen Needs Help - and What to Do About It. " If a teen is getting decent grades, is connecting with family members and has healthy relationships with friends, an occasional lapse from normalcy is not cause for concern, says Boesky, a clinical psychologist known as "Dr. Lisa.
NEWS
by DAVE McMILLION | February 6, 2006
charlestown@herald-mail.com CHARLES TOWN, W.Va. - Local and state officials concerned about people who solicit money along local highways and how the money is being used are trying to put some controls in place. Officials have shown concern about people who stand along roads in Jefferson County - particularly U.S. 340 - and collect money from passing motorists, Jefferson County Commission member Dale Manuel said. The groups claim to be collecting money for some type of cause, but sometimes it has been hard to determine what the money is being collected for, Manuel said.
NEWS
January 29, 1997
By FRANCA LEWIS Staff Writer Worrisome notions about a $2.1 million ice rink planned for Hagerstown prompted a delay Tuesday in an agreement that was to be struck between the mayor and City Council and the Washington County Sports Foundation. Mayor Steven T. Sager and City Council postponed a decision for three days, until Friday. Although they voiced support for the project, some council members expressed concern that the sports foundation failed to produce proper documentation to confirm it has raised $550,000 in private funds.
NEWS
by DAVE McMILLION | June 24, 2004
charlestown@herald-mail.com BUNKER HILL, W.Va. - More than 200 people turned out at a public hearing Wednesday night at Musselman High School to make impassioned pleas to county officials to control the spread of strip clubs and other adult businesses in Berkeley County. Saying it is time to "take back our county," county residents spoke in favor of a proposed county law that would prohibit "exotic entertainment" businesses from locating within 2,000 feet of establishments such as schools, churches, parks and recreation areas, hotels and motels and homes.
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NEWS
By DON AINES | dona@herald-mail.com | September 10, 2013
A left-turn lane from westbound U.S. 340 onto the east end of Keep Tryst Road will be completed in about a month, but most of the people who spoke Tuesday night at an Maryland State Highway Administration meeting were concerned that it might worsen a bad situation. The left turn onto Keep Tryst should open by mid-to-late November, Traffic Engineer John Wolford told the more than 40 area residents at the Brownsville Church of the Brethren. While traffic will be able to turn left from westbound U.S. 340, left turns from Keep Tryst onto 340 will not be permitted, he said.
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NEWS
By DAVE MCMILLION | davem@herald-mail.com | August 26, 2013
The idea of a company that works for the owner of the old Municipal Electric Light Plant being involved in the cleanup of PCB-laden water from the basement of that building reached the tipping point for Chris Klein on Monday evening. Klein, who owns property along Antietam Creek, where treated wastewater from the old electric plant along Eastern Boulevard would be dumped, expressed frustration during a Maryland Department of the Environment meeting in Hagerstown. He said Triad Engineering working on the cleanup is basically “the fox guarding the henhouse.” Klein told MDE officials they need to take a more active role in overseeing how the water is treated.
NEWS
By DAVE McMILLION | davem@herald-mail.com | August 12, 2013
A plan to build just more than 100 homes near Boonsboro's downtown area has drawn mixed reactions, with some residents fearing a planned entrance to the development on Alternate U.S. 40 will aggravate traffic congestion, while others say it is smart growth that will be good for the town. The Sycamore Run housing development is proposed for construction on 45 acres between Young Avenue and Alternate U.S. 40. The developers plan to build entrances to the development off Young Avenue and Alternate U.S. 40 near Cronise Market Place.
NEWS
By JULIE E. GREENE | julieg@herald-mail.com | August 7, 2013
Editor's note: This story was altered on Aug. 7, 2013 to clarify a quote by Wayne Ridenour on how he feels about the new method Washington County Public Schools will implement this year to evaluate teachers. Several Washington County Board of Education members said they like the more rigorous learning that comes with the Common Core State Standards and, in another school year, new assessment tests, but some board members expressed concerns. One of those concerns was whether students' computer skills will be sufficient since the new assessment tests are meant to be taken on computers.
NEWS
By DAVE McMILLION | davem@herald-mail.com | August 5, 2013
Several people showed up at a Boonsboro Town Council meeting Monday night to express concerns about the use of “smart meters” to measure electric use in buildings. One of the people who spoke, Mary Schanno, said smart meters emit microwave radiation and is worried that their use is associated with health complications like insomnia and migraine headaches. Although Schanno said she fears the meters are being used throughout the county, a Potomac Edison official said last week that the local provider is not installing smart meters in its Western Maryland service area.
NEWS
By C.J. LOVELACE | cj.lovelace@herald-mail.com | July 9, 2013
Panhandling is something that just about every city police department across the nation deals with on a regular basis, Hagerstown Police Lt. Paul Kifer said. “It's everywhere,” Kifer said Monday. “No matter where you go, especially in a city environment.” And the Hub City is not immune. Simply asking for money or cigarettes from people walking the streets is not illegal, according to Kifer. However, “aggressive panhandling” - in which people continue begging after they have been told to stop - is a reportable and enforceable offense, he said.
NEWS
By JULIE E. GREENE | julieg@herald-mail.com | June 26, 2013
After hearing school board members raise concerns Tuesday about the latest site proposal for a new “West City” elementary school, Washington County Schools Superintendent Clayton Wilcox suggested some problems could have been avoided if planners had not agreed to a parking lot change requested by the city. The site for the new school in the Hager's Crossing development is currently zoned R2, or residential, with a Planned Unit Development overlay for mixed-density residential. An amendment must be made to the PUD overlay for the school to be built at the site behind Walmart.
NEWS
By JULIE E. GREENE | julieg@herald-mail.com | June 10, 2013
Only three Washington County residents testified at a public hearing Monday night on a request by Columbia Gas of Maryland to raise residential and commercial customers' total natural gas bills by more than 16 percent. The utility company's proposed rate hikes are intended to boost revenues by $5.3 million, so the company can recover the cost of upgrading underground gas distribution facilities. Hagerstown resident Edward Kendall, who estimated he had been a Columbia Gas customer for more than 40 years, said at the hearing held at Hagerstown Community College that he was opposed to the rate hike.
LIFESTYLE
By CHRIS COPLEY | chrisc@herald-mail.com | June 2, 2013
Zombies. Giant super-storms. Runaway climate change. Alien invasions. Sneak attacks by invading enemy nations. Thrilling stuff of end-of-life-as-we-know-it science fiction books and movies. But as recent news coverage reminds us - Superstorm Sandy in New York; the fertilizer explosion in Texas; the huge tornado in Moore, Okla.; the train derailment and explosion in Baltimore - ordinary events bring plenty of disasters that can end life as we know it, at least for those affected.
NEWS
By C.J. LOVELACE | cj.lovelace@herald-mail.com | May 12, 2013
A request to change the title and increase the pay of a currently vacant Washington County emergency services position to better align with the job's responsibilities, and to hire a new person to fill the vacancy, drew mixed reviews from county leaders last week. It also raised concern from officers of at least two county volunteer EMS companies, who said they were not consulted or even notified of the request made by county Division of Emergency Services Director Kevin Lewis. Smithsburg EMS Chief James Ulrich, who serves as acting chairman of the Washington County Volunteer Fire and Rescue Association's EMS committee, said Friday that he and others from volunteer companies did not learn of the proposal until they saw a copy of the agenda a few days before last Tuesday's meeting of the Washington County Board of Commissioners.
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