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EDUCATION
December 5, 2011
Jefferson, Md., resident Jessy Schroeder, a senior at St. Mary's College of Maryland, is getting hands-on anthropology experience this year. With help from Julia King, associate professor of anthropology, Schroeder is creating an exhibit on European and native perspectives on land in early Maryland. “I'm researching not only how early Marylanders and people of the Chesapeake area viewed the land when they arrived here in the early 17th century, but also how they used it,” Schroeder said.
NEWS
by BONNIE H. BRECHBILL | July 31, 2004
bonnieb@herald-mail.com CHAMBERSBURG, Pa. -Under the eye of the 8-foot-3-inch gold leaf-covered statue of Benjamin Franklin, a large crowd gathered in the new Heritage Center Friday evening, the 140th anniversary of the burning of Chambersburg by Confederate troops during the Civil War. The center, in the former Valley National Bank building on the square, is the result of more than five years of work by Chamber of Commerce officials and...
NEWS
By KERRY LYNN FRALEY | September 23, 1998
MARTINSBURG, W.Va. - Motorists following the historical George Washington Trail through Berkeley, Jefferson and Morgan counties can thank Uncle Sam for the guided tour. A $60,000 federal grant funded under the new federal transportation bill - known as TEA-21 - will help cover the cost of 112 scenic highway signs, two kiosks and an interpretative center in the Caperton Station in Martinsburg, according to West Virginia Department of Transportation officials. The George Washington Trail is one of 24 transportation-related projects throughout West Virginia to receive a grant under the federally funded Transportation Enhancement program, said Rich Hartman, who manages the program at the West Virginia Department of Transportation in Charleston, W.Va.
NEWS
by LAURA ERNDE | July 10, 2003
laurae@herald-mail.com Sharpsburg celebrated its 240th birthday Wednesday without the man who was largely responsible for the party. Page T. Otto died Tuesday due to complications from surgery, said Sharpsburg Founder's Day organizer Jennifer Silbert. It was Otto's wish that the small town of 691 people commemorate July 9 as Founder's Day, the day when Joseph Chapline dedicated the town in honor of Maryland Gov. Horatio Sharpe. Two years ago, Otto organized the first Founder's Day celebration in many years, Silbert said.
NEWS
by TARA REILLY | September 17, 2006
SHARPSBURG - Sharpsburg's history contains more than just the Battle of Antietam. The Sharpsburg Historical Society was trying to send that message Saturday at Sharpsburg Heritage Day. While the bloodiest single-day Civil War battle is very much a part of the small town south of Hagerstown, Sharpsburg's history predates the battle by about 100 years. Saturday's event was held in conjunction with the anniversary weekend of the Sept. 17, 1862, Battle of Antietam. Established in 1763, the town has colonial history, was known as an agricultural center, grew into a busy commercial district and is said to have been the home of more C&O Canal boat captains than any other town in Washington County, said Edie Wallace, president of the historical society.
NEWS
by GREGORY T. SIMMONS | April 24, 2005
gregs@herald-mail.com BIG POOL - Tom Kerling stood aside from the dozen or so troops he was commanding before he began calling out orders Saturday at Fort Frederick State Park. Kerling, 31, of Westernport, Md., wore the clothes of a British sergeant during the French and Indian War, complete with red coat, black three-point hat and white stockings, and explained to the crowd of spectators the different ways a muzzle-loading rifle could be used. Of course, it could be fired.
NEWS
By MARIE GILBERT | September 13, 2008
SHARPSBURG -- A stroll through Sharpsburg brings you face-to-face with history.  There are stone houses from the 1700s that cradled the uncertain concept that became the United States of America. Churches still stand that served as hospitals during the Battle at Antietam. But history doesn't linger just in old structures. There are streets, monuments, cemeteries -- even family names -- that tell a story. It's a story that's more than 200 years old, and people sometimes need reminding.
NEWS
By ALLAN POWELL | June 19, 2009
The principle of separation of church and state reaches far back into our colonial history and beyond to "America's philosopher," John Locke, in England. It is, therefore, rather strange to be a witness to the current resistance to such an important and valued principle. One can only hope the present opposition is a fad that will fade as the morning mist. Because I have, for a long time, recognized the importance of the principle of separation of church and state, it was necessary to study the history of this idea and to be aware of its relevance for today.
NEWS
by HEATHER C. SMATHERS | July 19, 2004
Editor's note: This is the seventh in a series of stories examining the history of towns in Washington County. heathers@herald-mail.com SHARPSBURG - While Sharpsburg is most often associated with the Civil War battle of Antietam, some local historians try not to forget the town's colonial beginnings. Two Sharpsburg Historical Society members, Jan Wetterer and Brad Toole, who serve on the history committee for the society, want to preserve the foundations of the town's history.
ARTICLES BY DATE
EDUCATION
December 5, 2011
Jefferson, Md., resident Jessy Schroeder, a senior at St. Mary's College of Maryland, is getting hands-on anthropology experience this year. With help from Julia King, associate professor of anthropology, Schroeder is creating an exhibit on European and native perspectives on land in early Maryland. “I'm researching not only how early Marylanders and people of the Chesapeake area viewed the land when they arrived here in the early 17th century, but also how they used it,” Schroeder said.
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NEWS
By ALLAN POWELL | June 19, 2009
The principle of separation of church and state reaches far back into our colonial history and beyond to "America's philosopher," John Locke, in England. It is, therefore, rather strange to be a witness to the current resistance to such an important and valued principle. One can only hope the present opposition is a fad that will fade as the morning mist. Because I have, for a long time, recognized the importance of the principle of separation of church and state, it was necessary to study the history of this idea and to be aware of its relevance for today.
NEWS
By MARIE GILBERT | September 14, 2008
SHARPSBURG - A stroll through Sharpsburg brings you face-to-face with history. There are stone houses from the 1700s that cradled the uncertain concept that became the United States of America. Churches still stand that served as hospitals during the Battle at Antietam. But history doesn't linger just in old structures. There are streets, monuments, cemeteries - even family names - that tell a story. It's a story that's more than 200 years old, and people sometimes need reminding.
NEWS
By MARIE GILBERT | September 13, 2008
SHARPSBURG -- A stroll through Sharpsburg brings you face-to-face with history.  There are stone houses from the 1700s that cradled the uncertain concept that became the United States of America. Churches still stand that served as hospitals during the Battle at Antietam. But history doesn't linger just in old structures. There are streets, monuments, cemeteries -- even family names -- that tell a story. It's a story that's more than 200 years old, and people sometimes need reminding.
NEWS
by TARA REILLY | September 17, 2006
SHARPSBURG - Sharpsburg's history contains more than just the Battle of Antietam. The Sharpsburg Historical Society was trying to send that message Saturday at Sharpsburg Heritage Day. While the bloodiest single-day Civil War battle is very much a part of the small town south of Hagerstown, Sharpsburg's history predates the battle by about 100 years. Saturday's event was held in conjunction with the anniversary weekend of the Sept. 17, 1862, Battle of Antietam. Established in 1763, the town has colonial history, was known as an agricultural center, grew into a busy commercial district and is said to have been the home of more C&O Canal boat captains than any other town in Washington County, said Edie Wallace, president of the historical society.
NEWS
by GREGORY T. SIMMONS | April 24, 2005
gregs@herald-mail.com BIG POOL - Tom Kerling stood aside from the dozen or so troops he was commanding before he began calling out orders Saturday at Fort Frederick State Park. Kerling, 31, of Westernport, Md., wore the clothes of a British sergeant during the French and Indian War, complete with red coat, black three-point hat and white stockings, and explained to the crowd of spectators the different ways a muzzle-loading rifle could be used. Of course, it could be fired.
NEWS
by BONNIE H. BRECHBILL | July 31, 2004
bonnieb@herald-mail.com CHAMBERSBURG, Pa. -Under the eye of the 8-foot-3-inch gold leaf-covered statue of Benjamin Franklin, a large crowd gathered in the new Heritage Center Friday evening, the 140th anniversary of the burning of Chambersburg by Confederate troops during the Civil War. The center, in the former Valley National Bank building on the square, is the result of more than five years of work by Chamber of Commerce officials and...
NEWS
by HEATHER C. SMATHERS | July 19, 2004
Editor's note: This is the seventh in a series of stories examining the history of towns in Washington County. heathers@herald-mail.com SHARPSBURG - While Sharpsburg is most often associated with the Civil War battle of Antietam, some local historians try not to forget the town's colonial beginnings. Two Sharpsburg Historical Society members, Jan Wetterer and Brad Toole, who serve on the history committee for the society, want to preserve the foundations of the town's history.
NEWS
By KERRY LYNN FRALEY | September 23, 1998
MARTINSBURG, W.Va. - Motorists following the historical George Washington Trail through Berkeley, Jefferson and Morgan counties can thank Uncle Sam for the guided tour. A $60,000 federal grant funded under the new federal transportation bill - known as TEA-21 - will help cover the cost of 112 scenic highway signs, two kiosks and an interpretative center in the Caperton Station in Martinsburg, according to West Virginia Department of Transportation officials. The George Washington Trail is one of 24 transportation-related projects throughout West Virginia to receive a grant under the federally funded Transportation Enhancement program, said Rich Hartman, who manages the program at the West Virginia Department of Transportation in Charleston, W.Va.
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