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NEWS
April 27, 1997
For the past few months the mail deliveries that come to my home have brought a large assortment of brochures, catalogs and fliers from colleges around the country, all hoping that my son the honor student will pick them. I am proud, but a little bit sad at the same time. I'm proud because my son works hard to perform well, harder than I ever did at his age. I'm also sad because I know that when he goes on to college, I'll hear myself echoing the lament I've heard from so many other parents over the years.
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NEWS
By JOHN LEAGUE | June 27, 2009
This is a column for all of you high school graduates out there who don't really know what you want to do with your life. My advice: Don't spend too much time worrying about it. You'll figure it out. And while it won't always be easy, it will most likely be interesting. My son recently graduated from high school. If he and his friends were asked once, they were asked repeatedly variations of the same three questions: Where are you going to college? What are you going to study?
NEWS
May 1, 2010
Atlee Kepler left an indelible mark on many To the editor: I am writing today to express what cannot be captured in a newspaper article about the passing of Dr. Atlee Kepler. Forty years ago, I met Dr. Kepler in my hiring interview. While sitting with him, I knew I was in the presence of a very special man. Over the years I had the honor to serve under his leadership, I found him to be a selfless person who was professional, yet always personally interested in the individuals he hired.
NEWS
By SCOTT BUTKI | May 20, 1999
Hagerstown City Council's decision to offer a free site for the University System of Maryland campus was sparked by word the Frostburg State University Center would pare back operations at its downtown location, the city's mayor said Thursday. [cont. from front page ] Mayor Robert E. Bruchey II and former Mayor Steven Sager said in separate phone interviews they were worried that not only would the city lose the possibility of having a University System campus revitalize downtown but the city would have another empty building downtown.
NEWS
November 7, 1998
By ERICA NOONEY schedule S-A-T ... three letters that strike a pulsating chord of F-E-A-R into the heart of every American junior and senior. Combine those letters with the equation "Under 1200 equals the state of being in which one never will get into a decent college, have a decent job or get a decent family and will eventually wind up in an alley fighting stray dogs for a pack of stale french fries" and you have a mix that will send any teenager into a panic attack.
NEWS
by PEPPER BALLARD | January 1, 2004
pepperb@herald-mail.com Teaching more trades, treating teachers better and providing more discipline head up retired teacher William H. Staley's goals if elected to the Washington County Board of Education. Staley, 59, of Cearfoss, is one of 16 people to file for four seats coming open on the School Board. A primary election will be held March 2. Eight candidates will advance to the general election, to be held Nov. 2. Staley was a welding teacher at the Technical High School for 24 years before he split his days between teaching at that school and at Williamsport High School, he said.
NEWS
By Dee Mayberry | April 1, 2006
What happens when a dream crashes and its pieces lie scattered about - never to be repaired? A father sees a son walk away from the family farm. A promising romance falls apart. A talented athlete sustains a serious injury. Dreams cover things small and large - sometimes as lasting as news that a family will have no children, or as limited as a college rejection, or a job promotion denied. What seems permanent and unmanageable to one, may appear less important to another. The response is highly iandividualized as are the decisions, the spirit that follows.
NEWS
By MARIE GILBERT | June 6, 2009
HAGERSTOWN -- No one has to tell Hagerstown High School's class of 1934 about tough economic times. They lived through the Great Depression. When they graduated -- all 304 of them -- good jobs were hard to find. D. Earl Wolf Jr. said he went to work for A&P grocery store, stocking produce for $12 a week. "I thought I was a lucky man," he said. Al Gruber thought about going to college, but his family needed financial help, he said. So he landed a job with Pangborn Corp.
NEWS
Alicia Notarianni | Making Ends Meet | August 23, 2012
Tonight, when my son told me goodnight and hugged me, I cried. Not like I wiped a tear from my eye. More like, if you were an onlooker, you might have thought he had been diagnosed with a terminal illness. There had been no such calamity. The etiology of my tears was the impending onset of higher education. A week from today, he leaves for college, one that is six hours away. Yeah, I know. It's tragic, right? My offspring has been accepted to the institution of his choice where he'll have the option to build relationships, discover passions, develop maturity, grow in knowledge and likely increase his marketability and earning potential.
NEWS
By LISA PREJEAN | August 27, 2010
Young people are increasingly encouraged to become involved in their communities, to perform acts of service, to take on projects and to take a stand on issues of local importance. "How many hours of community service do you have?" is frequently a question on scholarship and college applications. Organizations realize that an involved person is an informed person, and an informed person is a person who can make a difference. People who can make a difference are viewed as successful, so those are typically the ones who earn scholarships and admittance to the colleges of their choice.
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