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NEWS
By ANDREW SCHOTZ | andrews@herald-mail.com | April 20, 2011
Del. Neil C. Parrott is trying to force a referendum on whether Maryland should give in-state college tuition to illegal immigrants, a measure the General Assembly approved this year. Parrott, R-Washington, who opposes the tuition plan, has taken the first step toward a petition drive, hoping to overturn the legislature’s work through a public vote, which Maryland allows. Gov. Martin O’Malley, a Democrat, plans to sign the bill into law, according to spokesman Shaun Adamec.
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NEWS
June 22, 2009
Hagerstown-Washington County Chamber of Commerce Susie Shaw of Professional Uniforms & Advertising Specialties won the Chamber's Business After Hours jackpot of $1,500 in May. Chamber members who are pre-registered and in attendance are eligible. One member company's name is drawn and all employees of that company who are present and pre-registered split the prize money. Each month the prize is not won, the jackpot increases by $250. After there is a winner, it is reset at $500.
NEWS
March 28, 2009
Thumbs down to the Washington County Commissioners, for approving $520,000 worth of new county personnel positions. At a time when many county residents are dealing with being laid off or having their hours reduced, government should do its part by doing more with less. Thumbs up to the Jefferson County (W.Va.) Commission, for agreeing to hold the line on property taxes, offsetting a drop in revenues with budget cuts. When the county residents find they have less money coming in, they spend less.
NEWS
March 6, 2004
Does state need a Hug? To the editor: Now University of Maryland Regent Richard Hug is under fire for soliciting donations for a pro-slots advertising campaign, and The Herald-Mail reports Hug's resignation is being sought. Since I am seeking another college program, I've read the numerous articles and editorials in various newspapers about increasing college tuitions with great interest. The reports note an almost 20 percent rise in Maryland college tuition this academic year and has me reflecting back on the role Gov. Robert Ehrlich's campaign manager, Richard Hug, played in that process.
NEWS
by CAILIN MCGOUGH | July 28, 2002
cailinm@herald-mail.com Tight state budgets have made for steep tuition increases this fall at several public institutions in the area. At Shippensburg University in Shippensburg, Pa., students will face a 9 percent increase in tuition when they return this fall, raising room and board costs from $2,321 to $2,432. The cost per credit hour will increase from $167 to $182 for resident students and from $418 to $456 for nonresidents. The Pennsylvania State System's Board of Governors approved the tuition rate increase for its 14 universities, including Shippensburg, after the system lost $14.2 million in state funding this year.
NEWS
by BOB MAGINNIS | June 27, 2002
The combination of soaring college tuition and a sluggish stock market may put West Virginia's pre-paid college tuition program in the hole by autumn, according to the state treasurer's office. Given how important education is to moving the state forward, finding a solution to this situation is crucial. Charles Bockway, the deputy state treasurer who oversees the tuition plan, raised the red flag this week, saying that the plan's investments had not earned anything substantial for two years in a row. In three years the plan's investments have averaged a 4.4 percent return, with a tiny .04 percent return for the fiscal year that ended in May. That's not enough to cover rising costs at state institutions, which increased tuition by an average of 9.2 percent this year.
NEWS
February 11, 1997
This past Monday President Clinton came to Annapolis to give a major address on educational policy. The president said many things, but though his speech was 53 minutes long, he didn't say everything. Allow us to fill in some of the blanks. Who can disagree when he says every 8-year-old should be able to read, that every 12-year-old should be able to surf the Internet and that every 18 year-old should be able to go to college? Not us, but can we really fault schools for every child's reading problem?
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