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NEWS
By ANDREW SCHOTZ | andrews@herald-mail.com | May 31, 2011
An organizer of a petition drive opposing in-state college tuition for illegal immigrants said his group expected to file enough signatures Tuesday night to meet a preliminary hurdle to take the issue to voters. Del. Neil C. Parrott, R-Washington, who is heading the effort, said the group planned to submit petitions containing about 40,000 signatures. The group needed to have at least 18,579 signatures by Tuesday, the first of two deadlines for forcing a referendum in the 2012 general election.
NEWS
by BOB MAGINNIS | June 27, 2002
The combination of soaring college tuition and a sluggish stock market may put West Virginia's pre-paid college tuition program in the hole by autumn, according to the state treasurer's office. Given how important education is to moving the state forward, finding a solution to this situation is crucial. Charles Bockway, the deputy state treasurer who oversees the tuition plan, raised the red flag this week, saying that the plan's investments had not earned anything substantial for two years in a row. In three years the plan's investments have averaged a 4.4 percent return, with a tiny .04 percent return for the fiscal year that ended in May. That's not enough to cover rising costs at state institutions, which increased tuition by an average of 9.2 percent this year.
NEWS
By DON AINES | dona@herald-mail.com | September 2, 2011
A Glen Burnie, Md., man accused of having 5 pounds of marijuana in his car told a sheriff's deputy he was trying to "make some money for my grandkid's college tuition," according to charging documents filed Friday in Washington County District Court. Neil Arthur Niefeld, 57, was charged with possession with intent to distribute narcotics, two counts of possession of other controlled dangerous substances, maintaining a common nuisance to distribute narcotics and three counts of possession of drug paraphernalia, the statement of probable cause said.
NEWS
June 3, 2011
The first review of petitions submitted this week opposing in-state college tuition for illegal immigrants shows a high rate of valid signatures. A Maryland State Board of Elections summary posted Friday said 4,496 signatures were valid in the petitions reviewed so far and 612 signatures were invalid — an initial success rate of 88 percent. At that pace, the group behind the petitions appears likely to hit its goal of placing the issue on the 2012 general election ballot and possibly overturning the new law. The group had to submit 18,579 valid signatures from registered voters by May 31 and another 37,157 by June 30. The group, led by Del. Neil C. Parrott, R-Washington, and Del. Patrick L. McDonough, R-Baltimore/Harford, said Wednesday that it turned in 62,496 signatures on Tuesday night, a number it also claimed on documents filed with the state.
NEWS
By ANDREW SCHOTZ | andrews@herald-mail.com | June 10, 2011
The American Civil Liberties Union of Maryland has asked the state to examine an online petition-signature system that's driving an effort to overturn a new law granting in-state college tuition to illegal immigrants. In a letter sent May 31 and released to the public on Friday, the ACLU told Linda Lamone, Maryland's elections administrator, that the online system invites fraud and violates a law prohibiting "pre-filled" petition forms. But Del. Neil C. Parrott, the petition drive's leader, said organizers shared their plan with the Maryland State Board of Elections in advance.
NEWS
By ANDREW SCHOTZ | andrews@herald-mail.com | June 1, 2011
After predicting about 40,000 signatures, organizers of a petition drive opposing in-state college tuition for illegal immigrants turned in more than 62,000 on Tuesday night. Tuesday was the deadline for the group to submit at least 18,579 valid signatures in their attempt to force a referendum on the new law in the 2012 general election. The second and final deadline is June 30, when they must have at least 55,736 valid signatures. Organizers are trying to gather many more signatures than the minimums, expecting that some will be invalidated.
NEWS
April 30, 2012
The Maryland Republican State Central Committee honored Del. Neil C. Parrott, R-Washington, this past weekend as Man of the Year. At the committee's annual convention, it also picked Ella Ennis as Republican Woman of the Year. David Ferguson, the Maryland Republican Party's executive director, said Parrott was nominated by central committee members for “his overall dedication,” particularly in fighting a new state law granting in-state college tuition to illegal immigrants.
NEWS
By ANDREW SCHOTZ | andrews@herald-mail.com | May 19, 2011
An organizer of a petition drive to overturn in-state college tuition for illegal immigrants said Wednesday that results have been good, but declined to provide the number of signatures that have been gathered thus far. Del. Neil C. Parrott, R-Washington, said he and others working on the effort are “on target” to get the issue onto the ballot for the 2012 general election. But Parrott would not provide specifics when asked how many signatures had been collected. The General Assembly passed the bill last month, and Gov. Martin O’Malley signed it into law this month.
NEWS
February 11, 1997
This past Monday President Clinton came to Annapolis to give a major address on educational policy. The president said many things, but though his speech was 53 minutes long, he didn't say everything. Allow us to fill in some of the blanks. Who can disagree when he says every 8-year-old should be able to read, that every 12-year-old should be able to surf the Internet and that every 18 year-old should be able to go to college? Not us, but can we really fault schools for every child's reading problem?
NEWS
March 6, 2004
Does state need a Hug? To the editor: Now University of Maryland Regent Richard Hug is under fire for soliciting donations for a pro-slots advertising campaign, and The Herald-Mail reports Hug's resignation is being sought. Since I am seeking another college program, I've read the numerous articles and editorials in various newspapers about increasing college tuitions with great interest. The reports note an almost 20 percent rise in Maryland college tuition this academic year and has me reflecting back on the role Gov. Robert Ehrlich's campaign manager, Richard Hug, played in that process.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
April 30, 2012
The Maryland Republican State Central Committee honored Del. Neil C. Parrott, R-Washington, this past weekend as Man of the Year. At the committee's annual convention, it also picked Ella Ennis as Republican Woman of the Year. David Ferguson, the Maryland Republican Party's executive director, said Parrott was nominated by central committee members for “his overall dedication,” particularly in fighting a new state law granting in-state college tuition to illegal immigrants.
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NEWS
By DON AINES | dona@herald-mail.com | September 2, 2011
A Glen Burnie, Md., man accused of having 5 pounds of marijuana in his car told a sheriff's deputy he was trying to "make some money for my grandkid's college tuition," according to charging documents filed Friday in Washington County District Court. Neil Arthur Niefeld, 57, was charged with possession with intent to distribute narcotics, two counts of possession of other controlled dangerous substances, maintaining a common nuisance to distribute narcotics and three counts of possession of drug paraphernalia, the statement of probable cause said.
EDUCATION
By MAEGAN CLEARWOOD | maegan.clearwood@herald-mail.com | July 9, 2011
It's difficult to estimate the true cost of a college education because the final figure amounts to more than the cost of taking classes. With tuition and mandatory fees, room and board, transportation, books and other expenses, many students find themselves facing hefty price tags. University System of Maryland schools this year are increasing tuition by 3 percent for the second consecutive year. According to Mike Lurie, media relations manager for USM, an agreement between Gov. Martin O'Malley, the Maryland General Assembly and USM froze tuition rates from 2005 through 2009.
NEWS
By ANDREW SCHOTZ | andrews@herald-mail.com | June 10, 2011
The American Civil Liberties Union of Maryland has asked the state to examine an online petition-signature system that's driving an effort to overturn a new law granting in-state college tuition to illegal immigrants. In a letter sent May 31 and released to the public on Friday, the ACLU told Linda Lamone, Maryland's elections administrator, that the online system invites fraud and violates a law prohibiting "pre-filled" petition forms. But Del. Neil C. Parrott, the petition drive's leader, said organizers shared their plan with the Maryland State Board of Elections in advance.
NEWS
June 3, 2011
The first review of petitions submitted this week opposing in-state college tuition for illegal immigrants shows a high rate of valid signatures. A Maryland State Board of Elections summary posted Friday said 4,496 signatures were valid in the petitions reviewed so far and 612 signatures were invalid — an initial success rate of 88 percent. At that pace, the group behind the petitions appears likely to hit its goal of placing the issue on the 2012 general election ballot and possibly overturning the new law. The group had to submit 18,579 valid signatures from registered voters by May 31 and another 37,157 by June 30. The group, led by Del. Neil C. Parrott, R-Washington, and Del. Patrick L. McDonough, R-Baltimore/Harford, said Wednesday that it turned in 62,496 signatures on Tuesday night, a number it also claimed on documents filed with the state.
NEWS
By ANDREW SCHOTZ | andrews@herald-mail.com | June 1, 2011
After predicting about 40,000 signatures, organizers of a petition drive opposing in-state college tuition for illegal immigrants turned in more than 62,000 on Tuesday night. Tuesday was the deadline for the group to submit at least 18,579 valid signatures in their attempt to force a referendum on the new law in the 2012 general election. The second and final deadline is June 30, when they must have at least 55,736 valid signatures. Organizers are trying to gather many more signatures than the minimums, expecting that some will be invalidated.
NEWS
By ANDREW SCHOTZ | andrews@herald-mail.com | May 31, 2011
An organizer of a petition drive opposing in-state college tuition for illegal immigrants said his group expected to file enough signatures Tuesday night to meet a preliminary hurdle to take the issue to voters. Del. Neil C. Parrott, R-Washington, who is heading the effort, said the group planned to submit petitions containing about 40,000 signatures. The group needed to have at least 18,579 signatures by Tuesday, the first of two deadlines for forcing a referendum in the 2012 general election.
NEWS
By ANDREW SCHOTZ | andrews@herald-mail.com | May 24, 2011
A Maryland delegate hoping to overturn a new law granting in-state college tuition for illegal immigrants said Tuesday his group has collected more than the minimum number of signatures for an early deadline. Del. Neil C. Parrott, R-Washington, said more than 25,000 signatures have been collected statewide, more than the required minimum of 18,579. However, the group is pressing on toward its goal of 35,000 signatures by May 31 as a safeguard against signatures being rejected as invalid or procedurally incorrect, Parrott said.
NEWS
By ANDREW SCHOTZ | andrews@herald-mail.com | May 19, 2011
An organizer of a petition drive to overturn in-state college tuition for illegal immigrants said Wednesday that results have been good, but declined to provide the number of signatures that have been gathered thus far. Del. Neil C. Parrott, R-Washington, said he and others working on the effort are “on target” to get the issue onto the ballot for the 2012 general election. But Parrott would not provide specifics when asked how many signatures had been collected. The General Assembly passed the bill last month, and Gov. Martin O’Malley signed it into law this month.
OPINION
By TIM ROWLAND | timr@herald-mail.com | April 30, 2011
By most accounts, freshman Del. Neil Parrott is a nice, personable fellow whose political views sometimes do a disservice to the man. But then, that's probably true for a lot of us. Parrott has succeeded well in life, personally and professionally. He was able to go to college and rise in his chosen field. You admire people like that. And had Parrott's parents uprooted him when he was a boy and taken him to a foreign land, I'm sure he would have succeeded there as well, learning the language, succeeding scholastically, going to college and establishing himself in his chosen profession — paying taxes and becoming a valuable asset to his community.
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