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Collard Greens

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NEWS
February 20, 2002
Eat your greens By KEVIN CLAPP kevinc@herald-mail.com The dark green color. The large, lush leafy countenance. It's not broccoli ... lettuce? Nope. continued Cabbage? Sorry. Kale? Spinach? Swiss chard? Mustard greens? Arugala? No, non, nix, nein and nyet. Dark, leafy, exotic (if only for its role in southern cookin'), the collard green - a.k.a. collards - is on the 10 Most Wanted list. Most Wanted Vegetables, that is. Loaded with the usual good nutritional suspects such as fiber, iron, vitamin C, vitamin A and calcium, collards are among the healthiest veggies singled out by the Washington, D.C.-based Center for Science in the Public Interest.
NEWS
Madge Miles | Around Jonathan Street | September 7, 2012
The Blossom School of Etiquette will begin new classes starting on Saturday from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the Hagerstown Presbyterian Church, 20 South Prospect St.   Young ladies ages 7 to 17 are invited to participate in free workshops. which include a variety of topics such as poise, assertiveness, social skills, table manners, manners, self-confidence, self-esteem and more. For more information, contact Ladetra Robinson at 240-520-5676 or bsetiquette@yahoo.com. Food sale at Second Christian Church There will be a Mix/Match Food Blow Out Sale at Second Christian Church, 65 W. North Ave., on Saturday from 10:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. Choose from several menus.
NEWS
Madge Miles | Around Jonathan Street | October 4, 2012
Former area basketball standout Lee Green will hold the 2012 Preseason Elite Skills Clinic Saturday, Oct. 20, from 9 a.m. to noon at St. Maria Goretti High School in Hagerstown. The clinic will include player development, teaching the fundamentals and advance skills, including ball handling, shooting, defender control and finishing moves. The clinic is geared for boys and girls in grades five through 12. The instructors will include Green, Phil Lane, Rodney Gibson and Jen Piccolomini.
NEWS
December 26, 1997
By DON AINES Staff Writer, Martinsburg Phyllis Adams got her Christmas wish Thursday with a special delivery by members of the Community Rescue Service. "I wanted my mother home for Christmas. I always prayed and I knew God would grant my wish," said Adams, of 456 Sumans Ave., with her mother Anna Adams sitting nearby. Earlier this year, Anna Adams became ill and has been living in the Colton Villa Nursing Center at 750 Dual Highway. On Christmas morning she came to her daughter's home thanks to personnel from the ambulance squad.
NEWS
by TIFFANY ARNOLD | December 27, 2006
For Audrey Ross, eating black-eyed peas on New Year's Day won't be enough to ensure good luck for 2007. "We always sprinkle a few black-eyed peas in the bottoms of our purses," said Ross, who lives in Martinsburg, W.Va. "You carry them around all year for good luck. Just two or three peas, uncooked. " Many cultures have their good luck food rituals for New Year's - whether it's black-eyed peas, a tradition with Southern roots, or eating a heaping dish of pork and sauerkraut, a tradition popular among many Pennsylvanians.
NEWS
Madge Miles | Around Jonathan Street | July 6, 2012
Second Christian Church, 65 W. North Ave., will hold a food sale Saturday from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Menu 1 includes fried chicken, potato salad and collard greens; menu 2 offers fried fish, macaroni and cheese with collard greens; and menu 3 includes barbecue ribs with baked beans and collard greens.  All of the meals include rolls and soda and a choice of cake, pie or soda. The meals cost $8. It will be eat in, carry out or by delivery. For delivery, call Agnes at 301-797-0407.
LIFESTYLE
By CHRIS COPLEY | chrisc@herald-mail.com | November 8, 2011
Editor's note: This is the first in an occasional series of stories interviewing local chefs. Ron Holman, who heads the kitchen at Georgia Boy Cafe at Park Circle in Hagerstown, does not think of himself as a chef. "I don't like to be called a chef. I'm a cook," he said. "I don't have any formal training as a chef. I just want to satisfy that (homestyle) customer. " Holman and business partner Montez Dorsey opened Georgia Boy Cafe at Park Circle about two years ago. The place has found a steady clientele serving homestyle, Southern dishes such as fried chicken, fried catfish, collard greens and barbecued chicken wings.
NEWS
by PEPPER BALLARD | August 27, 2006
HAGERSTOWN - Singing about "white beans, collard greens, sweet tea, chicken and dumplin's," Craig Morgan assured an audience stomping their feet Saturday at Hagerstown Community College's Alumni Amphitheater, "I'm Country. " Ryan Childs watched Morgan from the lawn of the amphitheater. He said he couldn't miss an opportunity to see a musician in concert who he hears on the radio all the time. "With a big name like that coming to a small town, you had to go," said Childs, 25, of Hagerstown.
NEWS
Chad Smith | January 11, 2013
Agricultural pesticide use has been on the rise, according to a study published late last year by Charles Benbrook, a research professor at the Center for Sustaining Agriculture and Natural Resources at Washington State University. In light of what the function is, I can't help to think that if pesticides kill little organisms quickly, what do pesticides do to big organisms long term?  It might be negligible in small amounts, but with the steady increases in use since the 1920s due to genetically engineered crops, we have to question what effect these chemicals are having on our physiologies.
NEWS
By MADGE MILES | September 3, 2010
Memorial Rec says thanks Memorial Recreation Center concluded its summer program with a last splash at the pool. The children enjoyed the pool this summer thanks to a generous donation from an anonymous supporter as well as financial support from the community. The youths also enjoyed several field trips, one which included a trip to Hagerstown Ice & Sports Complex. Loretta Wright, Memorial Rec's executive director, said, "It was a good summer and it wouldn't have been possible without the help of the community and the countless number of our neighbors and friends and I thank them all for being a part of this success, and a special thank you to the anonymous donor.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
Chad Smith | January 11, 2013
Agricultural pesticide use has been on the rise, according to a study published late last year by Charles Benbrook, a research professor at the Center for Sustaining Agriculture and Natural Resources at Washington State University. In light of what the function is, I can't help to think that if pesticides kill little organisms quickly, what do pesticides do to big organisms long term?  It might be negligible in small amounts, but with the steady increases in use since the 1920s due to genetically engineered crops, we have to question what effect these chemicals are having on our physiologies.
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NEWS
Madge Miles | Around Jonathan Street | October 4, 2012
Former area basketball standout Lee Green will hold the 2012 Preseason Elite Skills Clinic Saturday, Oct. 20, from 9 a.m. to noon at St. Maria Goretti High School in Hagerstown. The clinic will include player development, teaching the fundamentals and advance skills, including ball handling, shooting, defender control and finishing moves. The clinic is geared for boys and girls in grades five through 12. The instructors will include Green, Phil Lane, Rodney Gibson and Jen Piccolomini.
NEWS
Madge Miles | Around Jonathan Street | September 7, 2012
The Blossom School of Etiquette will begin new classes starting on Saturday from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the Hagerstown Presbyterian Church, 20 South Prospect St.   Young ladies ages 7 to 17 are invited to participate in free workshops. which include a variety of topics such as poise, assertiveness, social skills, table manners, manners, self-confidence, self-esteem and more. For more information, contact Ladetra Robinson at 240-520-5676 or bsetiquette@yahoo.com. Food sale at Second Christian Church There will be a Mix/Match Food Blow Out Sale at Second Christian Church, 65 W. North Ave., on Saturday from 10:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. Choose from several menus.
NEWS
Madge Miles | Around Jonathan Street | July 6, 2012
Second Christian Church, 65 W. North Ave., will hold a food sale Saturday from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Menu 1 includes fried chicken, potato salad and collard greens; menu 2 offers fried fish, macaroni and cheese with collard greens; and menu 3 includes barbecue ribs with baked beans and collard greens.  All of the meals include rolls and soda and a choice of cake, pie or soda. The meals cost $8. It will be eat in, carry out or by delivery. For delivery, call Agnes at 301-797-0407.
LIFESTYLE
By CHRIS COPLEY | chrisc@herald-mail.com | November 8, 2011
Editor's note: This is the first in an occasional series of stories interviewing local chefs. Ron Holman, who heads the kitchen at Georgia Boy Cafe at Park Circle in Hagerstown, does not think of himself as a chef. "I don't like to be called a chef. I'm a cook," he said. "I don't have any formal training as a chef. I just want to satisfy that (homestyle) customer. " Holman and business partner Montez Dorsey opened Georgia Boy Cafe at Park Circle about two years ago. The place has found a steady clientele serving homestyle, Southern dishes such as fried chicken, fried catfish, collard greens and barbecued chicken wings.
NEWS
By MADGE MILES | September 3, 2010
Memorial Rec says thanks Memorial Recreation Center concluded its summer program with a last splash at the pool. The children enjoyed the pool this summer thanks to a generous donation from an anonymous supporter as well as financial support from the community. The youths also enjoyed several field trips, one which included a trip to Hagerstown Ice & Sports Complex. Loretta Wright, Memorial Rec's executive director, said, "It was a good summer and it wouldn't have been possible without the help of the community and the countless number of our neighbors and friends and I thank them all for being a part of this success, and a special thank you to the anonymous donor.
NEWS
By TIFFANY ARNOLD | April 22, 2009
For too long, cooked greens were something you ate after an ultimatum, and disliking them earned you the title of "picky eater. " Chances are, the reason you never liked cooked greens in the first place had nothing to do with a phobia of all things veggie -- childhood onset, no doubt. More likely, somebody overcooked the greens. Let the quick-cook method come to the rescue, said Lynn Little, family and consumer sciences educator with University Maryland Cooperative Extension in Washington County.
NEWS
By EATON GOODE | March 2, 2008
KEARNEYSVILLE, W.Va. - The story of Georgia Boy Cafe & Lounge is printed on the front of the menu. I love a good story any time, but partner it with good food and that's my version of a best seller. So, here's the story: A young man, born in Terrell County, Ga., moves to Hagerstown in 1969. He misses the Southern cooking he used to enjoy and, at the age of 14, he begins dreaming about opening a Southern-style cafe. As is the way with dreams sometimes, his plans are put on hold for many years.
NEWS
By DAVE McMILLION | February 25, 2008
CHARLES TOWN, W.Va. - During the country's slave era, black servants often used waste meat from plantation homes in an attempt to "make ends meet," said Harold Stewart. As a result, meals centering around food like pigs' feet, beef tongue and ham hocks became commonplace and evolved into some of the most sought-after and tastiest of cuisine, according to Stewart, secretary of the Jefferson County chapter of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People. Different versions of the dishes evolved as cooks experimented by adding garlic and other spices, Stewart told a crowd of about 75 people at an NAACP event Sunday at Wainwright Baptist Church to pay tribute to the cuisine.
NEWS
by TIFFANY ARNOLD | December 27, 2006
For Audrey Ross, eating black-eyed peas on New Year's Day won't be enough to ensure good luck for 2007. "We always sprinkle a few black-eyed peas in the bottoms of our purses," said Ross, who lives in Martinsburg, W.Va. "You carry them around all year for good luck. Just two or three peas, uncooked. " Many cultures have their good luck food rituals for New Year's - whether it's black-eyed peas, a tradition with Southern roots, or eating a heaping dish of pork and sauerkraut, a tradition popular among many Pennsylvanians.
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