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Coffee Beans

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NEWS
By Kate Coleman | June 9, 1998
by Ric Dugan / staff photographer enlargment Amy Orsini has an automatic drip coffeemaker at home, but she usually waits to get to work at Bentley's Bagel's to have her morning cup of coffee. The house blend is called "fog lifter. " --cont from front page-- Whether you drink your coffee to lift your morning fog or relish the aroma and flavor, here are a few tips from experts to help make that first cup of Joe - or the second or third - a little bit better.
NEWS
June 19, 1997
By RICHARD F. BELISLE Staff Writer, Waynesboro GREENCASTLE, Pa. - Each morning Charles Rake fires up an antique roaster in front of his 164 E. Baltimore St. shop and turns out, depending on the day, a heady mix of freshly roasted coffee or freshly roasted peanuts. The aroma is a real nose-turner. Rake has owned Greencastle Coffee Roasters for two years. His business comes from repeat customers, browsers and a brisk mail-order operation. "I have regular customers from all around the area, from Martinsburg, W.Va.
NEWS
July 3, 1997
By RICHARD F. BELISLE Staff Writer, Waynesboro WAYNESBORO, Pa. - It's one of those places where you can get coffee and "just about a little bit of everything," said Tammie McAllister, owner of Freyja's Garden, a new business venture in Waynesboro. McAllister, 31, of Waynesboro, opened her small shop in May at 3 E. Main St. in the town square. Patrons can find coffee beans, custom coffee blends, special teas, hand-made jewelry, tie-dyed T-shirts, potpourri and accessories.
NEWS
By JENNIFER FITCH | waynesboro@herald-mail.com | February 5, 2012
The United States imports 2.3 million 60-kilogram bags of coffee a month, more than any other country, according to the International Coffee Organization. Amid all the java flowing in the Tri-State, some businesses are selecting beans that help others. Jeff and Stacy Myers opened a Chambersburg, Pa., coffee-roasting business, Abednego Coffee, in 2008, and started donating 25 percent of sales to nonprofit organizations. One of the primary recipients of funds is South East Asia Prayer Center ( www.seapc.us )
NEWS
By JULIE E. GREENE | June 5, 2004
HAGERSTOWN Jake Baer knows what a sweet spot he got when he bought the former Saum's Jewelers store on Public Square. He wants everyone else to enjoy the location, too. A furrier had inquired about the storefront, but Baer wanted something accessible to more people, so he chose local resident Clifford Lane's plan for a coffee shop. Coffee is one of those items that can draw a lot of people in, said Baer, an architect from Alexandria, Va., who has relatives in Hagerstown.
NEWS
By JENNIFER FITCH | waynesboro@herald-mail.com | February 5, 2012
Franklin County, Pa., might be 2,000 miles from the community of Biolley in Costa Rica, but one man is using the county as a distribution hub for coffee beans grown at two mountainous farms operated by his brother. Ricardo Hernández of Greencastle, Pa., said he's sold Coffea Diversa Inc. coffee to companies in New Jersey, New York, Ohio, Japan and Austria. Coava Coffee Roasters of Portland, Ore., took one of his varieties to a national barista competition. The Hernández family started its first farm in 1997 in southern Costa Rica, but found that the land needed additional cedar and teak trees for shade.
NEWS
By DON AINES | April 14, 2008
CHAMBERSBURG, Pa. -- Dr. George Galanis stared intently at the image on the screen from the CT scanner, a cross-section display showing a spongy, cubelike object. "I think it's a marshmallow," the radiologist said. Galanis was on a roll, having earlier identified a bag of coffee beans, a tiny bottle of Tabasco sauce and a Tupperware container, although he could not guess its exact contents. "He's like a magician," Dr. Robert Pyatt said to a group of young people in the Imaging Lab at Chambersburg Hospital.
NEWS
By Dennis Shaw | May 24, 1997
Coffee dependency contributes to decline of migratory songbirds It used to be, when I got discouraged about the state of the environment, I'd sit down with a fresh cup of coffee, and soon I'd feel better. But no more, for I've learned that my coffee habit is contributing to the decline of migratory songbirds. It's enough to drive me to drink. Only I wonder if distilling spirits doesn't also wreak some environmental damage. But I think I can stay sober, for I've also learned that there is hope - organic coffee.
LIFESTYLE
By TERESA DUNHAM CAVAGNARO | Special to The Herald-Mail | August 12, 2013
A new wave of coffee is brewing in Shepherdstown. Hypnocoffee Roastery, just off the beaten path at 104 S. King St., around the corner from the Sweet Shop Bakery and the Shepherdstown Public Library on German Street, is the little shop that offers what coffee aficionados refer to as the “third wave” of coffee. The third-wave movement is more about quality and less about speed, treating coffee more like a culinary experience, such as drinking wine, than a quick way to give you a morning jolt.
NEWS
by BONNIE H. BRECHBILL | April 14, 2006
GREENCASTLE, Pa. - Next time you're driving through Greencastle, if you see a guy with a long braid out on the sidewalk working with an old-fashioned metal roaster, park your car and go talk to him. He's roasting either coffee beans or peanuts, and once you smell either one, you're going to want some. His name is Charles Rake, and even if you don't buy anything from him, you're sure to have an interesting conversation. Rake, 54, recently celebrated 10 years of owning and operating Greencastle Coffee Roasters, probably the only building in Greencastle with gargoyles on the roof.
ARTICLES BY DATE
LIFESTYLE
By TERESA DUNHAM CAVAGNARO | Special to The Herald-Mail | August 12, 2013
A new wave of coffee is brewing in Shepherdstown. Hypnocoffee Roastery, just off the beaten path at 104 S. King St., around the corner from the Sweet Shop Bakery and the Shepherdstown Public Library on German Street, is the little shop that offers what coffee aficionados refer to as the “third wave” of coffee. The third-wave movement is more about quality and less about speed, treating coffee more like a culinary experience, such as drinking wine, than a quick way to give you a morning jolt.
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NEWS
By JENNIFER FITCH | waynesboro@herald-mail.com | February 5, 2012
Franklin County, Pa., might be 2,000 miles from the community of Biolley in Costa Rica, but one man is using the county as a distribution hub for coffee beans grown at two mountainous farms operated by his brother. Ricardo Hernández of Greencastle, Pa., said he's sold Coffea Diversa Inc. coffee to companies in New Jersey, New York, Ohio, Japan and Austria. Coava Coffee Roasters of Portland, Ore., took one of his varieties to a national barista competition. The Hernández family started its first farm in 1997 in southern Costa Rica, but found that the land needed additional cedar and teak trees for shade.
NEWS
By JENNIFER FITCH | waynesboro@herald-mail.com | February 5, 2012
The United States imports 2.3 million 60-kilogram bags of coffee a month, more than any other country, according to the International Coffee Organization. Amid all the java flowing in the Tri-State, some businesses are selecting beans that help others. Jeff and Stacy Myers opened a Chambersburg, Pa., coffee-roasting business, Abednego Coffee, in 2008, and started donating 25 percent of sales to nonprofit organizations. One of the primary recipients of funds is South East Asia Prayer Center ( www.seapc.us )
NEWS
By DON AINES | April 14, 2008
CHAMBERSBURG, Pa. -- Dr. George Galanis stared intently at the image on the screen from the CT scanner, a cross-section display showing a spongy, cubelike object. "I think it's a marshmallow," the radiologist said. Galanis was on a roll, having earlier identified a bag of coffee beans, a tiny bottle of Tabasco sauce and a Tupperware container, although he could not guess its exact contents. "He's like a magician," Dr. Robert Pyatt said to a group of young people in the Imaging Lab at Chambersburg Hospital.
NEWS
by BONNIE H. BRECHBILL | April 14, 2006
GREENCASTLE, Pa. - Next time you're driving through Greencastle, if you see a guy with a long braid out on the sidewalk working with an old-fashioned metal roaster, park your car and go talk to him. He's roasting either coffee beans or peanuts, and once you smell either one, you're going to want some. His name is Charles Rake, and even if you don't buy anything from him, you're sure to have an interesting conversation. Rake, 54, recently celebrated 10 years of owning and operating Greencastle Coffee Roasters, probably the only building in Greencastle with gargoyles on the roof.
NEWS
By JULIE E. GREENE | June 5, 2004
HAGERSTOWN Jake Baer knows what a sweet spot he got when he bought the former Saum's Jewelers store on Public Square. He wants everyone else to enjoy the location, too. A furrier had inquired about the storefront, but Baer wanted something accessible to more people, so he chose local resident Clifford Lane's plan for a coffee shop. Coffee is one of those items that can draw a lot of people in, said Baer, an architect from Alexandria, Va., who has relatives in Hagerstown.
NEWS
By Kate Coleman | June 9, 1998
by Ric Dugan / staff photographer enlargment Amy Orsini has an automatic drip coffeemaker at home, but she usually waits to get to work at Bentley's Bagel's to have her morning cup of coffee. The house blend is called "fog lifter. " --cont from front page-- Whether you drink your coffee to lift your morning fog or relish the aroma and flavor, here are a few tips from experts to help make that first cup of Joe - or the second or third - a little bit better.
NEWS
July 3, 1997
By RICHARD F. BELISLE Staff Writer, Waynesboro WAYNESBORO, Pa. - It's one of those places where you can get coffee and "just about a little bit of everything," said Tammie McAllister, owner of Freyja's Garden, a new business venture in Waynesboro. McAllister, 31, of Waynesboro, opened her small shop in May at 3 E. Main St. in the town square. Patrons can find coffee beans, custom coffee blends, special teas, hand-made jewelry, tie-dyed T-shirts, potpourri and accessories.
NEWS
June 19, 1997
By RICHARD F. BELISLE Staff Writer, Waynesboro GREENCASTLE, Pa. - Each morning Charles Rake fires up an antique roaster in front of his 164 E. Baltimore St. shop and turns out, depending on the day, a heady mix of freshly roasted coffee or freshly roasted peanuts. The aroma is a real nose-turner. Rake has owned Greencastle Coffee Roasters for two years. His business comes from repeat customers, browsers and a brisk mail-order operation. "I have regular customers from all around the area, from Martinsburg, W.Va.
NEWS
By Dennis Shaw | May 24, 1997
Coffee dependency contributes to decline of migratory songbirds It used to be, when I got discouraged about the state of the environment, I'd sit down with a fresh cup of coffee, and soon I'd feel better. But no more, for I've learned that my coffee habit is contributing to the decline of migratory songbirds. It's enough to drive me to drink. Only I wonder if distilling spirits doesn't also wreak some environmental damage. But I think I can stay sober, for I've also learned that there is hope - organic coffee.
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