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Climate Change

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OPINION
By TIM ROWLAND | timr@herald-mail.com | June 20, 2011
My contract allows me one conspiracy theory a year, and while I hate to use it up by June, I’ve stumbled across one that is too big to ignore, and when Oliver Stone comes out with the movie, I want to be the one thanked in the credits for bringing it to the public’s attention. I warn you right off, it’s not going to be popular on either side of the political spectrum. Those sheep on the left who believe anything the government spoon feeds them will think it daft, even if they agree with the underlying science.
NEWS
By CALEB CALHOUN | caleb.calhoun@herald-mail.com | June 1, 2012
In the face of a new report that carbon dioxide levels in the Earth's atmosphere may be their highest in at least 800,000 years, Hagerstown resident Mark Sands said Friday it's time to take climate change seriously. “It's something to be concerned about, and it's good that was reported,” said Sands, 50, referring to an Associated Press story published in The Herald-Mail on Thursday. “Something has to start being done, and some of the things to make clean air need to be more universal,” he said.
OPINION
By ALLAN POWELL | May 17, 2013
“The Third Industrial Revolution” has a much-needed educative value in equipping us to survive in a world of climate change. This book is a “must read” for those wanting to understand climate change, climate maintenance and their role in keeping a livable planet. Author Jeremy Rifkin is superb in presenting the case for global cooperation and is fully qualified to deal with the various sciences involved. I bought his first book (“Entropy: A New World View”) in 1980 and still refer to it for information about science.
NEWS
December 7, 2009
COPENHAGEN (AP) -- The largest and most important U.N. climate change conference in history opened Monday, with organizers warning diplomats from 192 nations that this could be the last best chance for a deal to protect the world from calamitous global warming. The two-week conference, the climax of two years of contentious negotiations, convened in an upbeat mood after a series of promises by rich and emerging economies to curb their greenhouse gases. Still, major issues have yet to be resolved.
NEWS
October 21, 2007
Equestrian open house THURMONT, Md. - The event will feature a petting zoo; also displays on horse rescue, therapeutic riding and equine sports massage. Noon to 4 p.m. today. Tranquility Farm Equestrian Education and Renewal Center, 11819 Whates Lane. Movie on climate change FREDERICK, Md. - "Out of Balance: Exxon-Mobil's Impact on Climate Change" shows how the oil company has influenced the debate about global warming. Discussion follows. 12:30 p.m. Unitarian Universalist Congregation of Frederick, 4880 Elmer Derr Road.
OPINION
July 25, 2013
Krauthammer seems confused about climate change To the editor: After reading Charles Krauthammer's column (July 7) attacking President Obama's climate change initiative, I feel a rebuttal is needed. First, the magnitude of the threat from global warming is not determined by polling as Krauthammer implies. It is a physical threat that is costing us right now, and that cost is increasing. Research shows that the effects likely will increase to 3.6 percent of world gross domestic product by 2100.
NEWS
November 25, 2009
WASHINGTON (AP) -- President Barack Obama will go to Copenhagen next month, a White House official said Wednesday, to participate in a long-anticipated, high-stakes global climate summit. The president will attend the summit on Dec. 9 before heading to Oslo to accept the Nobel Peace Prize, the official said. Obama's attendance had been in question until now. The official spoke on the condition of anonymity because the formal announcement has not been made. The conference had originally been intended to produce a new global climate change treaty on limiting emissions of greenhouse gases that would replace the 1997 Kyoto Protocol.
NEWS
By TIM ROWLAND | timr@herald-mail.com | June 7, 2011
Remember spring? That season between winter and summer, when crisp, lime-green mornings were gently toasted by the sun, inviting long walks or leisurely bicycle rides? When we could plant potatoes on St. Patrick's Day without a parka and peas on April Fools' Day without scuba gear? When blossoms were as ballet dancers, performing delicate, lengthy acts of colorful choreography — and not like strippers, where they pop out, show all and drop in 10 minutes tops. I don't know what's happened to that season, but I haven't seen much of it in several years running.
ARTICLES BY DATE
OPINION
August 24, 2013
New food law would hurt local farmers To the editor: Each week at our farm stands, we try to explain a peculiar situation to our customers. They come to buy our fresh fruit and vegetables, and I tell them that in a few years this produce will be illegal to sell. Why? Because it has some dirt and bacteria on it. The strawberries, for instance, have some trace amount of straw and soil on them. As do the tomatoes, beans and cucumbers. We do rinse them before leaving the farm, but we won't put them through a disinfectant bath or pack them in antiseptic plastic containers.
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OPINION
By ALLAN POWELL | May 17, 2013
“The Third Industrial Revolution” has a much-needed educative value in equipping us to survive in a world of climate change. This book is a “must read” for those wanting to understand climate change, climate maintenance and their role in keeping a livable planet. Author Jeremy Rifkin is superb in presenting the case for global cooperation and is fully qualified to deal with the various sciences involved. I bought his first book (“Entropy: A New World View”) in 1980 and still refer to it for information about science.
OPINION
July 17, 2012
“As an animal lover, I think it's great when the Humane Society of Washington County informs the community that it is in need of supplies. It gives all of us a chance to open our hearts and give to the animals in need at our local shelter.” - Clear Spring “I'm calling about the bridge work that is being done on Resley Road in Hancock, and I think the county commissioners had better take a clearer look at the dangerous spot...
NEWS
By CALEB CALHOUN | caleb.calhoun@herald-mail.com | June 1, 2012
In the face of a new report that carbon dioxide levels in the Earth's atmosphere may be their highest in at least 800,000 years, Hagerstown resident Mark Sands said Friday it's time to take climate change seriously. “It's something to be concerned about, and it's good that was reported,” said Sands, 50, referring to an Associated Press story published in The Herald-Mail on Thursday. “Something has to start being done, and some of the things to make clean air need to be more universal,” he said.
OPINION
By TIM ROWLAND | timr@herald-mail.com | January 4, 2012
I'm in a bad mood this morning. It's the only way to make New Year's resolutions - to be in a bad mood. Because that means that most of my resolutions will pertain to the actions of other people, not me. For one, I'm done associating with anyone who uses the phrase “torn asunder.” Those words just make me really, really angry for some reason. I understand that by disavowing this phrase I only risk disassociating myself from preachers, poets and songwriters and that this, technically, is no great loss.
OPINION
By TIM ROWLAND | June 26, 2011
For all the hand-wringing over negative campaigning, there's nothing new in it. Everything from naughty wives to illegitimate children were deemed suitable election issues to bring up in the nation's young years. What is brand new this year is running not for the office itself, but for profit. This shatters the previous limits to cynicism, where at least the fringe candidates of the past were honestly seeking office to promote their agendas, not fatten their wallets. Donald Trump was never going to run for president.
OPINION
By TIM ROWLAND | timr@herald-mail.com | June 20, 2011
My contract allows me one conspiracy theory a year, and while I hate to use it up by June, I’ve stumbled across one that is too big to ignore, and when Oliver Stone comes out with the movie, I want to be the one thanked in the credits for bringing it to the public’s attention. I warn you right off, it’s not going to be popular on either side of the political spectrum. Those sheep on the left who believe anything the government spoon feeds them will think it daft, even if they agree with the underlying science.
NEWS
By TIM ROWLAND | timr@herald-mail.com | June 7, 2011
Remember spring? That season between winter and summer, when crisp, lime-green mornings were gently toasted by the sun, inviting long walks or leisurely bicycle rides? When we could plant potatoes on St. Patrick's Day without a parka and peas on April Fools' Day without scuba gear? When blossoms were as ballet dancers, performing delicate, lengthy acts of colorful choreography — and not like strippers, where they pop out, show all and drop in 10 minutes tops. I don't know what's happened to that season, but I haven't seen much of it in several years running.
NEWS
Celeste Maiorana | April 22, 2011
Two very different recent readings nicely framed for me a primary objective of this column, which is to encourage people to plant trees and promote natural ecosystems. One was a book examining and advocating barefoot running; the other a review of science journal articles about the rate of species extinctions in the context of a changing climate. It is normal for species to go extinct, but lately the rate at which species are disappearing has been increasing. Historically, there have been five mass extinctions — periods when an estimated 75 percent or more of all species disappeared in a few million years or less.
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