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NEWS
April 18, 2009
Green Drinks Hagerstown will host a gathering on Earth Day, Wednesday, April 22, to rally support for action to improve the health of the Chesapeake Bay. The Hagerstown event is at 5:30 p.m. Wednesday at Duffy's on Potomac, 28 S Potomac St., Hagerstown. There will be complimentary appetizers and a cash bar. Admission is free, the public is invited and no reservations are required. The group will write letters to EPA Administrator Lisa Jackson asking the EPA to enforce the Clean Water Act for the benefit of the Chesapeake Bay. Green Drinks started in London in 1989.
NEWS
By MATTHEW UMSTEAD | matthew.umstead@herald-mail.com | January 16, 2012
A longtime paperboard manufacturer in Jefferson County, W.Va., has agreed to pay a $104,850 civil penalty to settle alleged water-pollution violations at its facility in Halltown near Harpers Ferry. Ox Paperboard LLC, formerly Halltown Paperboard, has agreed to pay the penalty, make additional system upgrades and pay $50,000 to fund an environmental project within the Shenandoah River watershed as part of a proposed agreement, according to the West Virginia Department of Environmental Protection and court documents.
NEWS
August 14, 1998
A Williamsport company that has been penalized by the state and federal governments for alleged environmental violations said Thursday it is "surprised and concerned" with the findings. The Environmental Protection Agency and the Maryland Department of Environment levied $126,000 in fines against Garden State Tanning for alleged violations of the Clean Water Act at its leather tanning and finishing plant. The EPA and Maryland Department of the Environment have cited Garden State for the following alleged violations: - Intermittently, since 1995, violating waste-water discharge permits by releasing excessive levels of pollutants into the Conococheague Creek and the Potomac River.
NEWS
by CANDICE BOSELY | March 23, 2005
martinsburg@herald-mail.com MARTINSBURG, W.VA. - Officials with Potomac Riverkeeper, a Rockville, Md., environmental activist group, say they will notify the Berkeley County Public Service Sewer District today that a lawsuit could be filed if pollution of the river does not stop. From 2001 to 2004, the Sewer District was cited for 126 violations of the Clean Water Act at two of its plants, Opequon and Baker Heights, and at various unpermitted sites throughout the county's stretch of river, Riverkeeper officials said.
NEWS
June 26, 2009
MARTINSBURG, W.Va. -- The West Virginia Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) announced this week it is seeking information from Eastern Panhandle residents to improve water quality in the Tuscarora Creek watershed. Workshops will be held Wednesday from 1 to 3 p.m. and 6 to 8 p.m. in Martinsburg to help the DEP prioritize pollution reduction projects, the agency said in a press release. The first session will be in the Dunn Building cafeteria, Room 200, at 400 W. Stephen St., and the second session will be in the boardroom at the Berkeley County Public Service Sewer District offices off Edwin Miller Boulevard behind The Daily Grind.
NEWS
By DAVE McMILLION, Charles Town | March 30, 2000
CHARLES TOWN, W.Va. - A Jefferson County Planning Commission member said he wants to make sure the City of Charles Town's sewage treatment plant can adequately serve the proposed 3,300-home Hunt Field development before the commission decides whether to accept a statement on its impact on the community. Planning Commission member Lyle "Cam" Tabb said he is concerned about whether the sewer plant can serve Hunt Field because the plant has had violations concerning the quality of water discharged from the facility.
NEWS
By KATE S. ALEXANDER | July 9, 2009
WAYNESBORO, Pa. -- "If we can stop erosion, the rest of this," Ed Merrifield said gesturing to his lengthy PowerPoint presentation on sediment control, "is irrelevant. " Rivers, streams and creeks in the Chesapeake Bay watershed suffer from sediment pollution that, due to soil erosion and runoff, is compromising water quality, said Merrifield, executive director of Potomac Riverkeeper Inc. Addressing the Antietam Watershed Association (AWA) on Wednesday, Merrifield encouraged the 20 people present to do their part to stop excessive sediment pollution.
NEWS
by PEPPER BALLARD | May 19, 2006
HAGERSTOWN Montgomery County State's Attorney Douglas F. Gansler told a group gathered Thursday at Washington County Courthouse about plans for fighting crime and cleaning up state water that he wants implemented if he is elected as Maryland Attorney General. Gansler, 43, a Democrat, announced his bid for Maryland Attorney General on Monday in Rockville, but he has not officially filed for the office. Incumbent Attorney General J. Joseph Curran Jr., 74, a Democrat who served as the state's attorney general for 20 years, has said he will not seek re-election.
NEWS
By LAURA ERNDE | September 16, 1998
WILLIAMSPORT - Officials from Garden State Tanning, a recent target of environmental groups, say the company is doing everything possible to minimize its impact on the Potomac River. "We, as a company, are very sensitive to the fact that it is the Potomac River," said Glenn D. Thornley, vice president for operations at the Clear Spring Road plant. --cont. from front page -- Making leather is a water-intensive operation. Up to 750,000 gallons a day is drawn from an underground spring and, if necessary, purchased from the City of Hagerstown, he said.
NEWS
October 4, 1997
By LAURA ERNDE Staff Writer The Tri-State area's watershed has no serious problems and is not especially vulnerable to pollution, the Environmental Protection Agency said Thursday. But in its first national assessment of regional water quality, the agency did say the watershed has lost a high number of wetlands and is prone to contamination from farmland runoff. More than 2,700 miles of rivers and streams in a four-state area make up the Conococheague-Opequon watershed, or drainage area.
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NEWS
By MATTHEW UMSTEAD | matthew.umstead@herald-mail.com | January 16, 2012
A longtime paperboard manufacturer in Jefferson County, W.Va., has agreed to pay a $104,850 civil penalty to settle alleged water-pollution violations at its facility in Halltown near Harpers Ferry. Ox Paperboard LLC, formerly Halltown Paperboard, has agreed to pay the penalty, make additional system upgrades and pay $50,000 to fund an environmental project within the Shenandoah River watershed as part of a proposed agreement, according to the West Virginia Department of Environmental Protection and court documents.
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NEWS
By KATE S. ALEXANDER | July 9, 2009
WAYNESBORO, Pa. -- "If we can stop erosion, the rest of this," Ed Merrifield said gesturing to his lengthy PowerPoint presentation on sediment control, "is irrelevant. " Rivers, streams and creeks in the Chesapeake Bay watershed suffer from sediment pollution that, due to soil erosion and runoff, is compromising water quality, said Merrifield, executive director of Potomac Riverkeeper Inc. Addressing the Antietam Watershed Association (AWA) on Wednesday, Merrifield encouraged the 20 people present to do their part to stop excessive sediment pollution.
NEWS
June 26, 2009
MARTINSBURG, W.Va. -- The West Virginia Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) announced this week it is seeking information from Eastern Panhandle residents to improve water quality in the Tuscarora Creek watershed. Workshops will be held Wednesday from 1 to 3 p.m. and 6 to 8 p.m. in Martinsburg to help the DEP prioritize pollution reduction projects, the agency said in a press release. The first session will be in the Dunn Building cafeteria, Room 200, at 400 W. Stephen St., and the second session will be in the boardroom at the Berkeley County Public Service Sewer District offices off Edwin Miller Boulevard behind The Daily Grind.
NEWS
April 18, 2009
Green Drinks Hagerstown will host a gathering on Earth Day, Wednesday, April 22, to rally support for action to improve the health of the Chesapeake Bay. The Hagerstown event is at 5:30 p.m. Wednesday at Duffy's on Potomac, 28 S Potomac St., Hagerstown. There will be complimentary appetizers and a cash bar. Admission is free, the public is invited and no reservations are required. The group will write letters to EPA Administrator Lisa Jackson asking the EPA to enforce the Clean Water Act for the benefit of the Chesapeake Bay. Green Drinks started in London in 1989.
NEWS
by PEPPER BALLARD | May 19, 2006
HAGERSTOWN Montgomery County State's Attorney Douglas F. Gansler told a group gathered Thursday at Washington County Courthouse about plans for fighting crime and cleaning up state water that he wants implemented if he is elected as Maryland Attorney General. Gansler, 43, a Democrat, announced his bid for Maryland Attorney General on Monday in Rockville, but he has not officially filed for the office. Incumbent Attorney General J. Joseph Curran Jr., 74, a Democrat who served as the state's attorney general for 20 years, has said he will not seek re-election.
NEWS
by CANDICE BOSELY | March 23, 2005
martinsburg@herald-mail.com MARTINSBURG, W.VA. - Officials with Potomac Riverkeeper, a Rockville, Md., environmental activist group, say they will notify the Berkeley County Public Service Sewer District today that a lawsuit could be filed if pollution of the river does not stop. From 2001 to 2004, the Sewer District was cited for 126 violations of the Clean Water Act at two of its plants, Opequon and Baker Heights, and at various unpermitted sites throughout the county's stretch of river, Riverkeeper officials said.
NEWS
May 18, 2001
Hooper concerned over growth plans following EPA decision By GEOFF BROWN / Staff Writer Jefferson County Commissioner Al Hooper expressed concern Thursday that the federal Environmental Protection Agency's blocking of a sewage plant permit could spell trouble for county growth plans. "This is very disconcerting to me that not only the powers in Charleston but (the EPA) will determine how we grow in Jefferson County," Hooper said Thursday at the commission's regular meeting.
NEWS
By DAVE McMILLION, Charles Town | March 30, 2000
CHARLES TOWN, W.Va. - A Jefferson County Planning Commission member said he wants to make sure the City of Charles Town's sewage treatment plant can adequately serve the proposed 3,300-home Hunt Field development before the commission decides whether to accept a statement on its impact on the community. Planning Commission member Lyle "Cam" Tabb said he is concerned about whether the sewer plant can serve Hunt Field because the plant has had violations concerning the quality of water discharged from the facility.
NEWS
By LAURA ERNDE | September 16, 1998
WILLIAMSPORT - Officials from Garden State Tanning, a recent target of environmental groups, say the company is doing everything possible to minimize its impact on the Potomac River. "We, as a company, are very sensitive to the fact that it is the Potomac River," said Glenn D. Thornley, vice president for operations at the Clear Spring Road plant. --cont. from front page -- Making leather is a water-intensive operation. Up to 750,000 gallons a day is drawn from an underground spring and, if necessary, purchased from the City of Hagerstown, he said.
NEWS
August 14, 1998
A Williamsport company that has been penalized by the state and federal governments for alleged environmental violations said Thursday it is "surprised and concerned" with the findings. The Environmental Protection Agency and the Maryland Department of Environment levied $126,000 in fines against Garden State Tanning for alleged violations of the Clean Water Act at its leather tanning and finishing plant. The EPA and Maryland Department of the Environment have cited Garden State for the following alleged violations: - Intermittently, since 1995, violating waste-water discharge permits by releasing excessive levels of pollutants into the Conococheague Creek and the Potomac River.
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