Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: HeraldMail HomeCollectionsClassical Music
IN THE NEWS

Classical Music

NEWS
BY KATE COLEMAN | April 15, 2002
katec@herald-mail.com Elaine Braun compares listening to classical music to watching a football game. "If you know the rules, you enjoy it more," she says. Braun will talk about musical rules this afternoon during "Know the Score," the second of two music education programs for adults offered by the Maryland Symphony Orchestra Guild during the orchestra's 20th anniversary season. Director of operations for the MSO since August 1999, Braun is calling her program "What Are You Listening For?"
Advertisement
NEWS
by KATE COLEMAN | February 8, 2007
Petr Skopek, 33, is a member of the first violin section of the Maryland Symphony Orchestra. Born in Czechoslovakia, Skopek lives in Hagers-town, which he calls a "great place, a well-kept secret," with his wife, Tia, and their 2 1/2-year-old daughter, Dahlia, for whom he recently bought a one-sixteenth-size violin. Q: How long have you been playing the violin? When did you start? Why? A: I've been playing since I was 6. My mother started me on the violin. I didn't want to play the violin; I thought it was a really girly instrument.
NEWS
by MARLO BARNHART | December 28, 2006
HAGERSTOWN - Paul Gould's appreciation for classical music was plain to see on his face as he listened to his friend, Leah Claiborne, play the piano for his enjoyment a few days before Christmas. "I so look forward to her visits and her music," Gould said. "I was a piano player myself until five years ago. " A former chief financial officer for Frick Co. in Waynesboro, Pa., Gould has been a resident at Western Maryland Hospital Center in Hagerstown for the past two years. Gould, 67, has amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, also known as Lou Gehrig's disease.
NEWS
By KATE S. ALEXANDER | May 4, 2008
WAYNESBORO, PA. - The walls of the Oller House in Waynesboro told the tales Saturday of the past through the language of the fans that adorned the 1892 home for the Waynesboro Historical Society's fourth annual Spring Tea. The tea is a major fundraiser for the historical society, which works to preserve and tell Waynesboro's story. Guests enjoyed a traditional Victorian tea service, complete with finger sandwiches and scones. Helen Shelley, chairwoman of the event, said the tea came about as a way to both raise money and give society members and guests a "nice social event.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 20, 2012
1. Revolutionary re-enactment National 50th anniversary event for Brigade of the American Revolution. Throughout the weekend, activities will take place in both the American and British camps. 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday , June 23, and 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Sunday, June 24. Civilian and military members of the Brigade talk at 11 a.m. and battle re-enactments at 1:30 p.m. Fort Frederick State Park, 11100 Fort Frederick Road, Big Pool. $3; $2, children. Call 301-842-2155. 2. Canal boat tours The Chesapeake and Ohio National Historical Park offers canal launch boat tours from Cushwa Basin to Lock 44. 10:30 a.m. and 12:15, 1:30 and 3 p.m. Saturdays and Sundays through summer.
NEWS
By DAN DEARTH | June 7, 2009
BOONSBORO -- Katrina Bushko is an aspiring talent scout. The 16-year-old Boonsboro High School senior is trying to find local performers by Oct. 2 to feature on a compact disc that she intends to sell for charity. That charity will be named later this summer. "That gives kids all summer to come up with (music) they can donate," Katrina said. "Right now, we're just getting volunteers. ... It's going to be all teen-based. " The project is being done in conjunction with the Washington County Association of Student Councils, an organization of which she is president.
OPINION
March 31, 2011
MSO concert a treat for those who appreciate classical music To the editor: This morning’s MSO concert report (March 21) which appeared on page A3 concluded with a few concert-goers who had no idea what the music was about, nor did they really care to know. Instead, they attended the concert because they wanted to attend the concert. I’m sure if your reporter asked a few other people, they might have been able to explain how much they liked the music and that’s why they attend MSO concerts — to enjoy great classical music performed by inspired musicians and conducted by an astute conductor who is capable of producing such great music.
NEWS
by ERIN CUNNINGHAM | February 16, 2007
CLEAR SPRING - She goes from class to rehearsal for a play. Then it's AP Calculus homework and piano practice. Seventeen-year-old Emily Myers is multitalented. The Clear Spring High School senior is involved in sports, music and student government, and is a member of the National Honor Society. Emily's extracurricular activities keep her so busy that she barely has time to squeeze in a conversation about her recent performance in front of about 500 people, including Maryland Gov. Martin O'Malley.
NEWS
October 3, 2000
Mail Call for 10/3 Editor's note - The Daily Mail is now including home towns in Mail Call at the end of your response. It's not mandatory, but we think it would be interesting to see where the calls are coming from. You still don't have to leave your name, but a home town would be of interest. And just in case you're worried, we're not capable of tracing your call. "Instead of the cattery license, how about getting a people license for these unselfish people.
NEWS
by KRISTIN WILSON | March 16, 2006
A violin performance of Vivaldi's Concerto in A minor: two to three minutes. "Valse Gracieuse," a performance piece for flute: four minutes. Vocal performances of "My Johann" and "Pieta Signore": seven minutes. Total performance time at the Cumberland Valley School of Music Performathon: 13 to 14 minutes. Gabrielle Sanfilippo, 15, has spent several months and dozens of hours practicing these flute, violin and vocal pieces to make her contribution to this weekend's continuous music performance fundraiser.
The Herald-Mail Articles
|