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NEWS
July 11, 2013
While Gettysburg, Pa., attracted thousands of tourists during the 150th anniversary of the Battle of Gettysburg last week, Chambersburg has several Civil War-related activities, too. Ted Alexander, chief historian at Antietam National Battlefield, will present a free program at the Chambersburg Heritage Center, 100 Lincoln Way East, at 1 and 3 p.m. July 20, which is Celebrate! The Arts at Old Market Day - the largest event of ChambersFest. Alexander will speak on the topic, “As They Saw the Rebels: Civilian Observations of the Antietam and Gettysburg Campaigns.” The Heritage Center also will show the film, “The Burning of Chambersburg” throughout the day between 10:30 a.m. and 3:30 p.m. July 20. The 29-minute film was created by WITF in 1989 for the 125th anniversary of the burning of the town.
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NEWS
Washington County Museum of Fine Arts | July 11, 2013
By Rebecca Massie Lane Special to The Herald-Mail    On June 16, 2012, the Washington County Museum of Fine Arts opened “Valley of the Shadow,” a landmark exhibition of authentic art and artifacts of regional, national, and international importance to commemorate the 150th anniversary of the American Civil War.  Focused on objects telling stories of the Maryland Campaign, particularly Antietam and concluding with the...
NEWS
By ROXANN MILLER | roxann.miller@herald-mail.com | July 5, 2013
Before 2008, few people knew about the Battle of Monterey Pass in Blue Ridge Summit. Washington Township, Pa., historian John Miller said the Gettysburg campaign has received all of the attention over the years, but the Battle of Monterey, fought on July 4 and 5, 1863, is no less important. On Friday, Friends of the Monterey Pass Battlefield Inc. members, and state and local dignitaries dedicated a marker to commemorate the second-largest Civil War battle in Pennsylvania. “This is a milestone in the community,” Miller said.
NEWS
By JENNIFER FITCH | waynesboro@herald-mail.com | July 4, 2013
From sledding to baseball, Doubleday Hill in River View Cemetery has long been a hub of activity in Williamsport. Now, the town is celebrating improvements made to further highlight the site's role in the Civil War. More than $23,000 in grant money contributed to refurbishment of three cannons and other enhancements for Doubleday Hill. “These are Williamsport's, and we've worked hard to keep it that way,” Councilman Scott Bragunier said of the cannons. The project, which was designed to improve public access, added 11 interpretive signs, handicapped parking, stairs, information about self-guided tours and a gravel path.
LIFESTYLE
By KATE COLEMAN | katec@herald-mail.com | July 3, 2013
Antietam National Battlefield is a beautiful place - perhaps at its loveliest in early summer. On a clear day, the South County landscape offers views of gently rolling fields of green grass, young corn and golden grain bordered in the distance by bluish mountains and wide open sky. On Saturday, July 6, at 7:30 p.m., the Maryland Symphony Orchestra will begin its 32nd season with the 28th annual Salute to Independence at Antietam National Battlefield....
NEWS
By JENNIFER FITCH | waynesboro@herald-mail.com | June 30, 2013
Gettysburg resident Daniel Lady left his farm July 1, 1863, and found a gruesome scene when he returned a few days later. The property on modern-day Hanover Road had become the only Confederate field hospital north of the Mason-Dixon Line. Surgeons threw body parts out Lady's parlor windows, and wounded men continued to seek shelter in his barn after the troops left. “They found dead soldiers that he and his 11-year-old son had to bury,” said Barb Mowery, president of the Gettysburg Battlefield Preservation Association, which took ownership of the farm in 1999.
NEWS
Linda Irvin-Craig | June 27, 2013
The library of the Washington County Historical Society was so busy in May of 1979 that there was not enough seating for the combination of volunteers researching for those who could not come and for the patrons who did come to use the resources.    The majority of gifts during the late 1970s and 1980s coming to WCHS were books filled with local historical information, maps, documents, photos and other archival items.    Admittedly, the...
NEWS
Staci Clipp | Around South Hagerstown | June 23, 2013
Dr. Thomas G. Clemens will be featured as the final speaker in the yearlong Civil War Lecture Series presented by the Washington County Museum of Fine Arts at 7 p.m. Thursday, July 11.The lectures are offered in conjunction with the museum's headline exhibition, “Valley of the Shadow,” commemorating the 150th anniversary of the Civil War in Maryland and southern Pennsylvania. Speakers for the Thursday Evening Series are drawn from a wealth of regional experts, historians, authors and preservationists.
LIFESTYLE
By MARIE GILBERT | marieg@herald-mail.com | June 21, 2013
There has been nothing like it before or since in American history - father against son, brother against brother, a horrible strife that divided families as well as states. The Civil War changed America profoundly, “leaving us a different people in everything,” said a New York Times editorial. It also was the stuff of legend. Generals became larger than life, battle stories grew to mythical proportions and the Civil War captured the national imagination. A century and a half after the last shots were fired, the battle between North and South remains in the American consciousness.
LIFESTYLE
By MARIE GILBERT | marieg@herald-mail.com | June 21, 2013
Long lines of two armies - one gray, one blue - came face to face at this small crossroads town on July 1, 1863, sparking the Civil War's greatest battle. For three hot days, it raged, etching names like Little Round Top and Pickett's Charge into the national memory. Waves of rebels beat against Union strongholds on high ground, fell back and surged forward again, leaving in their wake a sea  of carnage. Sometimes, the two sides were so close, one soldier recalled, that hostile gun barrels almost touched.
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