Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: HeraldMail HomeCollectionsCivil War Preservation Trust
IN THE NEWS

Civil War Preservation Trust

NEWS
By Tim Rowland | October 23, 2005
A key to Gen. Robert E. Lee's success was his preoccupation with the ground. At Antietam, where nothing else was to his advantage and the Potomac was to his back with only one nearby ford, his strategic choice of ground - along with a little help from A.P. Hill, saved what should have been a Union rout. High or low, open or wooded, Lee was keenly aware of the value of property. Today, the life-and-death aspects of land choices are fortunately reduced, although the debate remains hot. I can only imagine that developers, seeing as how it's their job, must look out over an unoccupied piece of ground and think, "What a waste.
Advertisement
OPINION
April 29, 2013
Battlefield superintendent thanks volunteers To the editor: On Saturday, April 6, Antietam National Battlefield participated in both the Civil War Preservation Trust's Park Day and the Alice Ferguson Foundation's Potomac Watershed Cleanup. These annual events call for volunteers to take part in a variety of conservation and preservation work projects at Civil War sites across the country as well as removing the trash from our waterways, roadsides and trail within the greater Potomac River watershed.
NEWS
By MARIE GILBERT | April 2, 2006
WASHINGTON COUNTY In 1862, armies of volunteers converged on the fertile cornfields near Sharpsburg, armed with muskets and bayonets and dedicated to a cause. On Saturday morning, another army of volunteers invaded those same fields, risen anew as a national historical site. But this time, instead of weapons, they carried shovels and saws. History buffs and preservationists joined forces Saturday at Antietam National Battlefield to help with routine repairs and maintenance, from tree planting to fence construction.
NEWS
April 4, 2008
SHARPSBURG - Volunteers will team up with the Civil War Preservation Trust today to help clean and restore America's historic battlefields, cemeteries and shrines. The event will be from 9 a.m. to noon at Antietam National Battlefield. There will be an interpretive program from 1:30 to 3:30 p.m. Volunteers are needed to clean up trails and stream banks, as well as help plant 2,000 seedlings. If there is inclement weather, the event will be postponed until Saturday, April 12.
NEWS
by DAVE McMILLION | October 31, 2002
charlestown@herald-mail.com HARPERS FERRY, W.Va. - For the second time this week, officials have announced that another large chunk of historic Civil War property in the School House Ridge area is about to be purchased for preservation. On Wednesday afternoon, Del. John Doyle, D-Jefferson, presented the Civil War Preservation Trust $300,000 in state money to help the non-profit organization clinch a $1.7 million deal to buy 232 acres on School House Ridge. The $300,000 will be added to $55,000 Doyle helped secure through the state budget digest and more than $200,000 members of the Civil War Preservation Trust donated for the purchase of the land, said James Lighthizer, president of the trust.
NEWS
August 23, 2006
A downtown building was evacuated and traffic interrupted Tuesday afternoon when the Hagerstown Fire Department responded to a call for an odor of gas at 11 Public Square. According to Kyd Dieterich, battalion chief, the odor smelled more like sewage. "Apparently, some trash in the waste can left a horrifying smell," Dieterich said. Dieterich said the waste can had been emptied, but a stench remained. The offending waste can was in the offices of the Civil War Preservation Trust, on the second floor above the Rhubarb House, Dieterich said.
NEWS
by DAVE McMILLION | August 25, 2006
HARPERS FERRY, W.VA. - Charles Town attorney Mike Cassell on Thursday outlined the legal documents that he believes gave his client, Jefferson Utilities, the right to lay water and sewer lines through a section of Harpers Ferry National Historical Park last weekend. According to documents in the Jefferson County Clerk's Office obtained Thursday by The Herald-Mail, Jefferson Utilities would be allowed to "excavate for, lay (and) install" water and sewer lines in the School House Ridge area of the park under an easement agreement.
NEWS
by DAVE McMILLION | January 16, 2006
charlestown@herald-mail.com CHARLES TOWN, W.Va. - If the project is a success, the process of establishing a park to protect a Civil War battlefield near Shepherdstown, W.Va., could take about two years, according to the head of a group working to save the battlefield. Ed Dunleavy, president of the Shepherdstown Battlefield Preservation Association LLC, made the comments following a Jefferson County Commission meeting Thursday. Dunleavy asked the commission to sign an application for $100,000 from the state Department of Transportation to help purchase the battlefield property and the commission approved signing the application on a 3-2 vote.
NEWS
by DAVE McMILLION | August 24, 2006
HARPERS FERRY, W.VA. - The laying of water and sewer lines through a section of Harpers Ferry National Historical Park last weekend by a private utility company raised the ire of more park supporters Wednesday. The Civil War Preservation Trust and the National Parks Conservation Association issued a joint news release criticizing the move, saying the construction was done "purposely and without permission. " "Americans have a right to expect that land protected by the Park Service cannot be bulldozed outside of an orderly and legal review," Joy Oakes, spokesman for the National Parks Conservation Association, said in the release.
The Herald-Mail Articles
|