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Civil War Preservation Trust

NEWS
November 23, 1999
From Staff and AP reports SPRINGFIELD, Va. - A Hagerstown-based Civil War preservation group announced a merger Tuesday morning designed to help raise $16 million to save endangered battlefields, including South Mountain in Frederick County, Md. cont. from front page The Civil War Preservation Trust, created by the merger of the Association for the Preservation of Civil War Sites and the Civil War Trust, hopes to save more acreage by joining forces. APCWS' office in Hagerstown's Public Square will remain open for the time being, but the new organization will evaluate whether to combine it with the Civil War Trust's Arlington, Va., office, said James Lighthizer, president of the new organization.
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NEWS
March 18, 2008
On Saturday, April 5, volunteers from around the country will team up with the Civil War Preservation Trust to help clean and restore America's historic battlefields, cemeteries and shrines. The nationwide effort, known as Park Day, will include nearly 80 historic sites in 24 states. Antietam National Battlefield is again participating in this year's Park Day activities. Volunteers are needed to clean up trails and stream banks, as well as help plant 2000 seedlings as part of a riparian buffer/restoration effort.
NEWS
By MATTHEW UMSTEAD | November 30, 1999
MARTINSBURG, W.Va. ? A resolution adopted by both chambers of the West Virginia Legislature this week recognizes Boydville, a leafy antebellum estate in Martinsburg, as a historic farm as part of lawmakers' formal request that Berkeley and Jefferson counties be part of a national Civil War historic district. Sponsored by state Sens. John Unger, D-Berkeley, John Yoder, R-Jefferson, and Clark Barnes, R-Randolph, Senate Concurrent Resolution 10 formally asks the state and federal government to recognize the counties as part of the historic Shenandoah Valley and be eligible to join the Shenandoah Valley Battlefields National Historic District.
NEWS
By MATTHEW UMSTEAD | July 3, 2008
MARTINSBURG, W.VA. -- Advocates of preserving land where the Battle of Falling Waters was fought 147 years ago in northern Berkeley County announced the first donation to the cause Wednesday, the anniversary of the Civil War engagement. The donation of less than a half acre (0.43 acres) along Hammonds Mill Road near St. Andrew's Drive near Spring Mills, W.Va., was finalized in February, said Gary Gimbel, president of the Falling Waters Battlefield Association. Allen Henry made the donation on behalf of Panhandle Builders & Excavating Inc., the company he leads.
NEWS
March 13, 2008
Volunteer on Park Day SHARPSBURG -- On Saturday, April 5, volunteers from around the country will team up with the Civil War Preservation Trust to help clean and restore America's historic battlefields, cemeteries and shrines. The nationwide effort -- dubbed Park Day -- will include nearly 80 historic sites in 24 states. Park Day, now in its 12th year, is an annual hands-on preservation event created by the CWPT in which local groups and interested people can help with the maintenance of Civil War sites.
NEWS
by DAVE McMILLION | March 10, 2006
CHARLES TOWN, W.Va. - A group trying to preserve a Civil War Battlefield near Shepherdstown, W.Va. asked the Jefferson County Commission Thursday to allocate up to $1 million to help purchase the land. Two members of the Jefferson County Commission said after Thursday's commission meeting that they do not believe the county will allocate the money. Commission member Dale Manuel said the commission is facing many funding requests for paid firefighters, additional deputies and other needs and funds are tight.
NEWS
by TAMELA BAKER | March 31, 2003
tammyb@herald-mail.com SHARPSBURG - A little rain didn't stop a group of about 25 volunteers from venturing outdoors for some hard work - and a lot of satisfaction - at Antietam National Battlefield on Saturday. Some were local; some had traveled a bit to participate in Park Day 2003, created by the Civil War Preservation Trust for the purpose of restoring Civil War sites to their 19th-century appearance. For the mud-covered volunteers at Antietam, one of 65 sites in 18 states participating in Park Day this year, the project at hand was replanting the historic Piper Orchard with apple trees.
NEWS
June 11, 2004
Good thing Bush didn't oversee the Cuban missile crisis To the editor: The United States must admit that it was wrong in attacking Iraq and apologize to the world to restore our international credibility. The war was only a distraction from the war on terror, diverting resources that could have been used for that effort and at the same time giving more incentive to the terrorists, which has been brought out by attacks throughout the world, most recently in Spain.
NEWS
By Tim Rowland | October 23, 2005
A key to Gen. Robert E. Lee's success was his preoccupation with the ground. At Antietam, where nothing else was to his advantage and the Potomac was to his back with only one nearby ford, his strategic choice of ground - along with a little help from A.P. Hill, saved what should have been a Union rout. High or low, open or wooded, Lee was keenly aware of the value of property. Today, the life-and-death aspects of land choices are fortunately reduced, although the debate remains hot. I can only imagine that developers, seeing as how it's their job, must look out over an unoccupied piece of ground and think, "What a waste.
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