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Civic Duty

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By DAVID YOUNT / Scripps Howard News Service | July 3, 2009
With the U.S. population nearing 307 million, demographers have revealed that, for the first time in history, married couples head fewer than half of the nation's households. Today, the typical American adult is unmarried, either living a solitary life or residing with unrelated persons. During June, don't be fooled by those smiling couples you see in newspaper wedding announcements. Marriage, long in decline, is now a minority institution and shows no signs of revival. It's a cause for concern, and not just for sentimental reasons.
NEWS
Susie Hoffman | Around Funkstown | April 2, 2012
So why are the children not attending classes Tuesday?  Because their schools are serving another purpose. Area schools are closed to students so they can open to voters. If you are a registered voter in Washington County, you should have recently received a notice of your voting location. Do your civic duty, and make your voice heard. School happenings Hopefully this amazing weather will hold out throughout the week so that our children can enjoy spring break. Area schools will be closed Thursday and Friday for a long holiday weekend.
NEWS
March 8, 2005
In the past, The Herald-Mail has written get-out-the-vote editorials that spoke about citizens' civic duty and the sacrifices made by past generations to preserve this precious right. Those are still true, and good reasons to vote in today's Hagerstown primary election. But there are others as well, reasons which may persuade voters to cast ballots. After years of effort, the University System of Maryland was persuaded to locate a campus in downtown Hagerstown. This is important because of the prestige it brings to the city, but also because it provides educational opportunities that local people desperately need.
NEWS
by GREGORY T. SIMMONS | April 25, 2003
Washington County State's Attorney Ken Long made a surprise appearance Thursday in the Washington County Circuit Court building as a juror. Long said he didn't try to use his leverage as one of the county's top law enforcers to get him out of jury duty, but the irony didn't keep others from having a good time at his expense. "I wanted to do my civic duty. If you get the opportunity to do it, do it," said Long, who usually spends his days upholding the laws of Maryland as the county's chief prosecutor.
NEWS
BY BOB MAGINNIS | February 28, 2002
The Berkeley County, W.Va. water board's passage of an order prohibiting non-essential uses of water is just the latest sign that the Tri-State area must start developing additional sources and long-term conservation strategies. Of course it may rain heavily in the next two weeks, leading some to believe that the current shortage of rainfall and groundwater was only a temporary problem. Maybe, if your definition of "temporary" is less than a decade. Earlier this month, meteorologist Jim Vaughn told The Herald-Mail's Andrew Schotz that the drought has gone on since July 1998 and the region is 38.5 inches below normal rainfall.
NEWS
By MATTHEW UMSTEAD | matthew.umstead@herald-mail.com | October 4, 2011
Tuesday's special gubernatorial election didn't make much sense to some Berkeley County voters, given that the winner only gets a 14-month term. "There should have been an easier way to do it," said Eric Fortney after voting at Tuscarora Elementary School in Martinsburg. While Fortney said he feels it is his civic duty to vote, he added that the special election made "absolutely" no sense and also questioned the expense of early voting. Supporters of Republican Bill Maloney said the election was justified because their candidate could get much accomplished in the remaining months of former Gov. Joe Manchin's unexpired four-year term.
NEWS
September 23, 2005
We are not about terror To the editor: I, a Muslim, acknowledge that the hijackers who destroyed the World Trade Center and attacked the Pentagon are terrorists responsible for the deaths of thousands of innocent lives. And while I admit they are terrorists, I cannot acknowledge them as being "Muslim Terrorists," just as I cannot acknowledge Timothy McVeigh as being a "Christian Terrorist" because of his name. All were bad people who have committed crimes against humanity.
NEWS
by JENNIFER FITCH | May 15, 2007
GREENCASTLE, Pa. -Four people will appear on primary ballots for five open seats on the Greencastle-Antrim School Board, and at least one other resident is planning a write-in effort to also obtain a nomination. Incumbents Howard B. Ritchey and Arnie Jansen have opted to run for four-year terms. Jansen's neighbor, Eric Holtzman, will be running as will Paul Politis. Kristy M. Faulkner has announced a write-in campaign, meaning her name must be written on 10 ballots of either party to proceed to the general election this November.
NEWS
by ANDREA ROWLAND | November 4, 2002
andrear@herald-mail.com As Election Day approaches, Tri-State area residents are divided over whether they will vote Tuesday. Some people interviewed Saturday said they were too busy or too disillusioned or just didn't care enough to vote. Others said they wouldn't miss an opportunity to help choose their representatives in local, state and national government. As a registered Independent, Bill Tyler of Smithsburg couldn't vote in the primary election. But he won't miss the chance to make a difference in the general election, he said.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
Susie Hoffman | Around Funkstown | April 2, 2012
So why are the children not attending classes Tuesday?  Because their schools are serving another purpose. Area schools are closed to students so they can open to voters. If you are a registered voter in Washington County, you should have recently received a notice of your voting location. Do your civic duty, and make your voice heard. School happenings Hopefully this amazing weather will hold out throughout the week so that our children can enjoy spring break. Area schools will be closed Thursday and Friday for a long holiday weekend.
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NEWS
By MATTHEW UMSTEAD | matthew.umstead@herald-mail.com | October 4, 2011
Tuesday's special gubernatorial election didn't make much sense to some Berkeley County voters, given that the winner only gets a 14-month term. "There should have been an easier way to do it," said Eric Fortney after voting at Tuscarora Elementary School in Martinsburg. While Fortney said he feels it is his civic duty to vote, he added that the special election made "absolutely" no sense and also questioned the expense of early voting. Supporters of Republican Bill Maloney said the election was justified because their candidate could get much accomplished in the remaining months of former Gov. Joe Manchin's unexpired four-year term.
NEWS
By DAVID YOUNT / Scripps Howard News Service | July 3, 2009
With the U.S. population nearing 307 million, demographers have revealed that, for the first time in history, married couples head fewer than half of the nation's households. Today, the typical American adult is unmarried, either living a solitary life or residing with unrelated persons. During June, don't be fooled by those smiling couples you see in newspaper wedding announcements. Marriage, long in decline, is now a minority institution and shows no signs of revival. It's a cause for concern, and not just for sentimental reasons.
NEWS
November 7, 2008
"In reference to the person who was interested in the cheerleading program, it is called the Washington County Junior Football League. They usually run an ad in the paper when sign-ups are, but you'll have to wait till next year since they are done this season. " "Election voice: My husband and I voted today, and just wanted to say what a terrific job the volunteers did at the voting place in Clear Spring, and very nice people. " -- Clear Spring "I beg the news media to wait at least two years before mentioning the next election.
NEWS
by JENNIFER FITCH | May 15, 2007
GREENCASTLE, Pa. -Four people will appear on primary ballots for five open seats on the Greencastle-Antrim School Board, and at least one other resident is planning a write-in effort to also obtain a nomination. Incumbents Howard B. Ritchey and Arnie Jansen have opted to run for four-year terms. Jansen's neighbor, Eric Holtzman, will be running as will Paul Politis. Kristy M. Faulkner has announced a write-in campaign, meaning her name must be written on 10 ballots of either party to proceed to the general election this November.
NEWS
September 23, 2005
We are not about terror To the editor: I, a Muslim, acknowledge that the hijackers who destroyed the World Trade Center and attacked the Pentagon are terrorists responsible for the deaths of thousands of innocent lives. And while I admit they are terrorists, I cannot acknowledge them as being "Muslim Terrorists," just as I cannot acknowledge Timothy McVeigh as being a "Christian Terrorist" because of his name. All were bad people who have committed crimes against humanity.
NEWS
March 8, 2005
In the past, The Herald-Mail has written get-out-the-vote editorials that spoke about citizens' civic duty and the sacrifices made by past generations to preserve this precious right. Those are still true, and good reasons to vote in today's Hagerstown primary election. But there are others as well, reasons which may persuade voters to cast ballots. After years of effort, the University System of Maryland was persuaded to locate a campus in downtown Hagerstown. This is important because of the prestige it brings to the city, but also because it provides educational opportunities that local people desperately need.
NEWS
by GREGORY T. SIMMONS | April 25, 2003
Washington County State's Attorney Ken Long made a surprise appearance Thursday in the Washington County Circuit Court building as a juror. Long said he didn't try to use his leverage as one of the county's top law enforcers to get him out of jury duty, but the irony didn't keep others from having a good time at his expense. "I wanted to do my civic duty. If you get the opportunity to do it, do it," said Long, who usually spends his days upholding the laws of Maryland as the county's chief prosecutor.
NEWS
by ANDREA ROWLAND | November 4, 2002
andrear@herald-mail.com As Election Day approaches, Tri-State area residents are divided over whether they will vote Tuesday. Some people interviewed Saturday said they were too busy or too disillusioned or just didn't care enough to vote. Others said they wouldn't miss an opportunity to help choose their representatives in local, state and national government. As a registered Independent, Bill Tyler of Smithsburg couldn't vote in the primary election. But he won't miss the chance to make a difference in the general election, he said.
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