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City Editor

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NEWS
November 30, 2000
Headlee named executive editor of Herald-Mail Terry Headlee has been appointed executive editor of The Herald-Mail. As executive editor, Headlee is the chief news editor of The Morning Herald, The Daily Mail and the weekend Herald-Mail newspapers. "From reporter to city editor, Terry has done a splendid job with every assignment he's been given," said John League, editor and publisher of The Herald-Mail Co. "He inherits a great staff, and I look forward to great things under his leadership.
NEWS
March 7, 2009
On any particular day at The Herald-Mail, an editor has to be in charge of putting out the newspaper. I am one of several of those people. So what does the so-called slot editor do? First and foremost, the slot editor often is the first to edit stories filed by reporters before those stories are placed on the page by other editors. The slot editor needs to make sure everything in the story is accurate, is not libelous and does not put someone in an unnecessarily bad light.
NEWS
By ANDREW SCHOTZ | andrews@herald-mail.com | May 3, 2011
John League, The Herald-Mail's editor and publisher since 1995, plans to retire in July, capping a 32-year career with the company. League, 56, revealed his plans Monday during a series of meetings with Herald-Mail employees. There are "other things I want to do with my life," he said Tuesday during an interview. He didn't name anything specific, but said it will be fun deciding what to do next. Schurz Communications Inc., the Indiana-based company that owns The Herald-Mail, plans to have a replacement ready when League leaves.
NEWS
By LIZ THOMPSON | November 18, 2007
I didn't figure out what I wanted to be when I grew until I was in my mid-20s. That's when I stumbled into my first job at a newspaper. I've loved the profession ever since. There have been several forays into public relations jobs during the last quarter century, but I've always come back to newspapers. Covering local communities is important work, work that makes me proud every day. We cover local governments, report on crime, try to watch for trends in growth and education, and try to give readers a clear picture of the community in which they live.
NEWS
March 31, 2001
Editor is back in the newsroom, and loving it By LIZ THOMPSON After a five-year break to take two different jobs in public relations, I have returned to journalism. That sigh of contentment you heard a couple of months ago was me. Coming back to journalism was a lot like settling into an overstuffed chair with a freshly brewed cup of hot tea and a really great book. It's just a comfortable fit. After spending 12 years with The Herald-Mail, moving into public relations was an entirely different experience.
NEWS
by LIZ THOMPSON | December 15, 2003
We speak a different language in the newsroom. Oh, it's English, but the definition of some of our words is not the definition you may be used to. In the newsroom, we have a "budget" that has nothing to do with money, we like "evergreens" and we "pitch" our stories. To explain further, let me tell you about a typical day in the newsroom as we prepare to put out the next day's paper. As city editor, it's my job to coordinate coverage of various stories and keep track of what reporters are working on throughout the day. Each morning when I get to work, there already are some stories I know we'll be working on, meetings or events that we have planned to cover.
NEWS
By LIZ THOMPSON | September 9, 2007
One of the great things about being the city editor at The Herald-Mail is that I never know who is on the other end of a phone call. Of course, that also is one of the worst things about being the city editor. We've gotten some great calls from readers who made suggestions on stories or told us about something that was going on that we had not heard about. Many of my calls lead to stories. But as I've said in previous columns, not all of my phone calls are enjoyable. Many are frustrating - for me and for the caller.
NEWS
By Liz Thompson | December 18, 2005
At Tuesday's Hagerstown City Council meeting, Councilwomen Penny M. Nigh and Kelly S. Cromer took exception to a story The Herald-Mail ran Friday, Dec. 9, about a weeklong conference they and Councilwoman Alesia D. Parson-McBean were attending in Charlotte, N.C. Nigh criticized the newspaper for writing the story and said, "We are singled out. We are the women. " Cromer agreed. Let me introduce myself. My name is Liz Thompson and I am the city editor at The Herald-Mail.
NEWS
by JOHN LEAGUE | November 9, 2003
Newspaper writing has always fascinated me, as have the work habits of reporters. I've worked with reporters who could bang out a 15-inch story - about three typewritten, double-spaced pages - in 15 minutes, with nary a typo, misspelling or factual error. I've also worked with reporters who would labor over their story for hours on end, filing only when the deadline and an editor loomed (or threatened, sometimes with violence). There is no right or wrong way. It was unique to the individual, and the demands of that story, that workday and the always-looming deadline.
NEWS
BY LIZ THOMPSON | May 28, 2002
One of my job responsibilities as city editor is to serve as the complaint department. People who are unhappy with coverage, people who were covered and didn't want to be, people who find errors in stories, people who didn't like a photograph, people who didn't like where a story ran in the paper and anyone else with a complaint are usually sent to me. Most of these people are, I'm happy to say, polite. We talk reasonably and in adult-like fashion - almost always on the telephone - about the problem or complaint.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By ANDREW SCHOTZ | andrews@herald-mail.com | May 3, 2011
John League, The Herald-Mail's editor and publisher since 1995, plans to retire in July, capping a 32-year career with the company. League, 56, revealed his plans Monday during a series of meetings with Herald-Mail employees. There are "other things I want to do with my life," he said Tuesday during an interview. He didn't name anything specific, but said it will be fun deciding what to do next. Schurz Communications Inc., the Indiana-based company that owns The Herald-Mail, plans to have a replacement ready when League leaves.
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NEWS
March 7, 2009
On any particular day at The Herald-Mail, an editor has to be in charge of putting out the newspaper. I am one of several of those people. So what does the so-called slot editor do? First and foremost, the slot editor often is the first to edit stories filed by reporters before those stories are placed on the page by other editors. The slot editor needs to make sure everything in the story is accurate, is not libelous and does not put someone in an unnecessarily bad light.
NEWS
By TIM SHEA | April 20, 2008
Readers who have had questions about why we make some of the decisions we make here at The Herald-Mail only have had a couple of avenues available to them in the past. One option was to pick up the phone and ask the city editor, executive editor or whomever else you needed to speak with to make your opinion known. Writing a letter to the editor that would run on our opinion pages was another option. Another option was to just do nothing. Thanks to the ever-expanding Internet and the resources available on our Web site, there now is a new option.
NEWS
January 6, 2008
Panhandle Home Health MARTINSBURG, W.Va. - Louise Plowman, assistant clinical manager, was named Panhandle Home Health's 2007 Employee of the Year during the in-home health services company's annual banquet to celebrate National Home Health Care Month. Plowman has been with Panhandle Home Health for 12 years, starting as a nurse in the field. As assistant clinical manager, she coordinates the nursing schedules. Also during the banquet, the following employees were recognized for their years of service: - 20 years - Brenda Kish, registered nurse.
NEWS
By LIZ THOMPSON | November 18, 2007
I didn't figure out what I wanted to be when I grew until I was in my mid-20s. That's when I stumbled into my first job at a newspaper. I've loved the profession ever since. There have been several forays into public relations jobs during the last quarter century, but I've always come back to newspapers. Covering local communities is important work, work that makes me proud every day. We cover local governments, report on crime, try to watch for trends in growth and education, and try to give readers a clear picture of the community in which they live.
NEWS
By LIZ THOMPSON | September 9, 2007
One of the great things about being the city editor at The Herald-Mail is that I never know who is on the other end of a phone call. Of course, that also is one of the worst things about being the city editor. We've gotten some great calls from readers who made suggestions on stories or told us about something that was going on that we had not heard about. Many of my calls lead to stories. But as I've said in previous columns, not all of my phone calls are enjoyable. Many are frustrating - for me and for the caller.
NEWS
By Liz Thompson | April 23, 2006
Several times a month, I get calls from people who don't want their name or a family member's name in the paper. In every case I can think of, my response has been, "Sorry. If we do that story, your name is going to be in it. " Most of the calls are from people who have been charged with a crime. Some people think that if they call and say "don't put my name in the newspaper," then we can't use the name. It doesn't work like that. Charging documents are a matter of public record and we don't need permission to print the information they contain - including the name of the person charged.
NEWS
By Liz Thompson | December 18, 2005
At Tuesday's Hagerstown City Council meeting, Councilwomen Penny M. Nigh and Kelly S. Cromer took exception to a story The Herald-Mail ran Friday, Dec. 9, about a weeklong conference they and Councilwoman Alesia D. Parson-McBean were attending in Charlotte, N.C. Nigh criticized the newspaper for writing the story and said, "We are singled out. We are the women. " Cromer agreed. Let me introduce myself. My name is Liz Thompson and I am the city editor at The Herald-Mail.
NEWS
by LIZ THOMPSON | December 15, 2003
We speak a different language in the newsroom. Oh, it's English, but the definition of some of our words is not the definition you may be used to. In the newsroom, we have a "budget" that has nothing to do with money, we like "evergreens" and we "pitch" our stories. To explain further, let me tell you about a typical day in the newsroom as we prepare to put out the next day's paper. As city editor, it's my job to coordinate coverage of various stories and keep track of what reporters are working on throughout the day. Each morning when I get to work, there already are some stories I know we'll be working on, meetings or events that we have planned to cover.
NEWS
by JOHN LEAGUE | November 9, 2003
Newspaper writing has always fascinated me, as have the work habits of reporters. I've worked with reporters who could bang out a 15-inch story - about three typewritten, double-spaced pages - in 15 minutes, with nary a typo, misspelling or factual error. I've also worked with reporters who would labor over their story for hours on end, filing only when the deadline and an editor loomed (or threatened, sometimes with violence). There is no right or wrong way. It was unique to the individual, and the demands of that story, that workday and the always-looming deadline.
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