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Cheating

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NEWS
by JULIE E. GREENE | February 24, 2003
julieg@herald-mail.com Teachers in several Tri-State area high schools and colleges are using computer programs to scan for plagiarism, banning cell phone use in the classroom and updating academic honesty policies to keep up with technological advances. These moves were already under way, but discussion about cheating has heated up since 12 students at the University of Maryland College Park were accused of using the text messaging functions on their cell phones to receive messages from people outside the exam hall.
NEWS
By TERI JOHNSON | August 27, 1998
Just exactly what is cheating in a relationship? It depends whom you ask. Everyone has a different definition about what it means to be unfaithful to their vows, says Dr. Joyce Brothers, a psychologist based in New York. "Men and women see it very differently," Brothers says. Cheating doesn't have to involve a sexual relationship, says Nancy Barnett, director of Individual, Marriage and Family Therapy Center in Hagerstown. "A strong emotional involvement with anyone other than the spouse can play out the same way a physical affair does and have the same impact," Barnett says.
NEWS
by TIM ROWLAND | February 22, 2007
Commentary Like many Americans, I had paid some, but not much, attention to the motorsport known as NASCAR - until I learned there was cheating, lying and deceit involved. This changes everything. It's like, no one ever paid any attention to Robert Hanssen before they learned he was selling lists of the Pentagon's favorite restaurants to the Reds. Cheating in NASCAR? We expect that behavior in Major League baseball, but not here. Actually in NASCAR, I'm told, that's not completely true.
NEWS
February 5, 2001
Cheating strips away the spirit of learning Public schools were established so all classes of youth would have the opportunity to gain the benefits that an education provides. continued Children held a passion for learning and a thirst for knowledge. An education served as their key to future success. Today, though, as we commission more standardized testing and students have available such tools as the Internet, they seem to have lost the ambition to learn.
NEWS
by STEPHANIE SNYDER | March 21, 2006
According to Dictionary.com, love is "a deep, tender, ineffable feeling of affection and solicitude toward a person, such as that arising from kinship, recognition of attractive qualities, or a sense of underlying oneness. " In the sense of a relationship, I feel this means devoting your love to a single person and staying entirely faithful to that one person. It means that when you make the commitment to go steady with someone or marry someone, you have morals. Specifically, you don't cheat.
NEWS
January 29, 2000
Dear Katy, I just found out that my boyfriend of two years has been seeing someone behind my back. I've kind of suspected it, but my best friend finally broke down and told me that she's known about it all along. It's been happening for almost two months, and she just now told me! When I confronted my boyfriend about it, he denied it, but I know that it's true because I have proof. I don't know if I should break up with him, and I don't know whether or not I should be mad at my friend for not telling me. Help!
NEWS
by TIFFANY ARNOLD | December 8, 2006
Academic dishonesty is inevitable and irrepressible, say six of 10 high school students polled by The Herald-Mail. They say cheating is wrong. Most say they know the consequences if they're caught. But the majority say there's nothing schools can do to stop people from cheating. "There will always be someone to cheat," said a 15-year-old male respondent, who said he attended 10th grade at Williamsport High School. "That's how life goes. If someone is going to cheat, they will do it no matter what schools say. " The informal, unscientific poll surveyed 10 randomly selected high school students at Valley Mall earlier this week.
NEWS
August 16, 2010
It's hard to put any faith in sports anymore. Baseball allows one or two teams to buy up all the good players, basketball players shoot more guns than jump shots, football players beat up their girlfriends, tennis players have on-court meltdowns and bicyclists routinely grow third eyeballs from all the drugs they've ingested. Like many people, I hold different sports to different standards. For example, I believe that college football teams that are not routinely in the Top 20 should be allowed to cheat.
NEWS
by BOB PARASILITI | March 22, 2005
bobp@herald-mail.com Morality took a big hit last week. A big hit. A "Moe pointing to the sky before kicking Curly in the groin" Three Stooges kind of calamity. The one-two combination below the belt came courtesy of America's two pastimes, baseball (the traditional one) and NASCAR (the adopted one). We found out that athletes cheat. Gasp! Next thing you know, we'll be finding out that WMD actually means Western Maryland. And for those who didn't know that, the Naive Express has just pulled up with Santa Claus driving and Tinkerbell passing out refreshments.
NEWS
March 3, 2008
"This is in response to the person from Boonsboro who wants to know 'why is the government even considering handing out taxpayer dollars to help Nora Roberts?' If you think government money hasn't been given to previous owners of the old hotel, you are sadly mistaken. You should also know that Nora Roberts has not asked for anything. She has, however, offered her help to people affected by the fire - not to mention her help funding the $20,000 scholarship she gives every year locally, since 1994, and the numerous other things she does for this town.
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NEWS
By CALEB CALHOUN | caleb.calhoun@herald-mail.com | January 10, 2013
Major League Baseball's all-time leader in home runs and MVP awards, the all-time leader in Cy Young Awards, and the only player to hit more than 60 home runs in three different seasons were on the Baseball Hall of Fame ballot this year. Despite those accomplishments, Barry Bonds, Roger Clemens and Sammy Sosa were not voted into the Baseball Hall of Fame, and many area residents were just fine with that because of the players' connections to performance-enhancing drugs. “If you can't play by the rules, you don't belong in that elite class,” Hagerstown resident Richard Schwartz, 51, said.
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NEWS
By DAN DEARTH | dan.dearth@herald-mail.com | May 26, 2012
Wilbur Snyder dropped out of Hagerstown High School in the ninth grade and went to work for the railroad. On May 7, 1951, he was drafted by the U.S. Army and sent to Camp Gordon, Ga., to be a signalman. But when he was sent to Korea later that year, his military occupational specialty changed. “They handed me an M-1 (rifle) and said you're an infantryman,” the 82-year-old Snyder said recently at his Funkstown home. “I had to get on-the-job training.” The Korean War had been raging for about nine months before Snyder arrived at Pusan in March 1951.
NEWS
Chad Smith | March 25, 2011
This time of year, many people begin dieting — to "lean" up for the summer. But unfortunately most of these people will fail. Why? Because the diet tends to be too strict, too soon. Back in my bodybuilding days, I gradually progressed myself into the super-strict competition diet. By easing into the most difficult part of the nutrition program, I was better able to stick to it. Even then, I had an ace up my sleeve, which really cemented my compliance: the cheat meal. If you are dieting, the cheat meal, or the "refeed," as it's been called, is a powerful weapon in the dieter's arsenal against fat because it gives a nice reward for a week of disciplined eating.
NEWS
January 22, 2011
Those who insist that the budget deficit is tremendously out of whack today are correct. But they need to make their argument fast, because in two to three years, finances in this country will be back to what passes as normal. Federal revenues are running $43 billion ahead of a year ago, which is mostly attributable to the early stages of an economic recovery. Spending for the same period is up too, but "only" by $26 billion. So in this quarter, the deficit is shrinking, and, according to the Congressional Budget Office, it will continue to shrink rapidly through 2014 (barring any unforeseen tax cuts or major government expenses)
NEWS
August 16, 2010
It's hard to put any faith in sports anymore. Baseball allows one or two teams to buy up all the good players, basketball players shoot more guns than jump shots, football players beat up their girlfriends, tennis players have on-court meltdowns and bicyclists routinely grow third eyeballs from all the drugs they've ingested. Like many people, I hold different sports to different standards. For example, I believe that college football teams that are not routinely in the Top 20 should be allowed to cheat.
NEWS
By TIFFANY ARNOLD | December 2, 2009
In the midst of holiday season -- aka the "eating season" -- some folks prepping for Christmas, Kwanzaa and Hanukkah gatherings would rather not do the paper-plate thing. Besides, who says food is the only star of the table? Why not give its supporting cast - the dinnerware - some time to shine? To help demystify what goes where in a formal place setting, we sought out Pat Spellar, co-owner of Carol & Company, a boutique in downtown Hagerstown. Spellar is used to being asked about what goes where on the table this time of year.
NEWS
March 3, 2008
"This is in response to the person from Boonsboro who wants to know 'why is the government even considering handing out taxpayer dollars to help Nora Roberts?' If you think government money hasn't been given to previous owners of the old hotel, you are sadly mistaken. You should also know that Nora Roberts has not asked for anything. She has, however, offered her help to people affected by the fire - not to mention her help funding the $20,000 scholarship she gives every year locally, since 1994, and the numerous other things she does for this town.
NEWS
by TIM ROWLAND | February 22, 2007
Commentary Like many Americans, I had paid some, but not much, attention to the motorsport known as NASCAR - until I learned there was cheating, lying and deceit involved. This changes everything. It's like, no one ever paid any attention to Robert Hanssen before they learned he was selling lists of the Pentagon's favorite restaurants to the Reds. Cheating in NASCAR? We expect that behavior in Major League baseball, but not here. Actually in NASCAR, I'm told, that's not completely true.
NEWS
by TIFFANY ARNOLD | December 8, 2006
Academic dishonesty is inevitable and irrepressible, say six of 10 high school students polled by The Herald-Mail. They say cheating is wrong. Most say they know the consequences if they're caught. But the majority say there's nothing schools can do to stop people from cheating. "There will always be someone to cheat," said a 15-year-old male respondent, who said he attended 10th grade at Williamsport High School. "That's how life goes. If someone is going to cheat, they will do it no matter what schools say. " The informal, unscientific poll surveyed 10 randomly selected high school students at Valley Mall earlier this week.
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