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Charles Dickens

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NEWS
By DAVE MCMILLION | davem@herald-mail.com | December 19, 2010
For a moment Sunday, a small corner of Hagerstown was moved to another time, when flaming Christmas pudding, some tea and a Christmas tale about ghosts were standard offerings. It happened at The Women’s Club, which was an appropriate backdrop for a tribute to English author Charles Dickens and his classic story “A Christmas Carol,” published in 1843. The home at 31 S. Prospect St. with its high ceilings and rooms resembling Victorian parlors from Dickens’ days blended with hosts serving a welcoming glass of sherry and treats like homemade scones.
NEWS
by KRISTIN WILSON | December 8, 2005
´ kristinw@herald-mail.com Charles Dickens' classic "A Christmas Carol" is coming to The Maryland Theatre stage in a slightly not-so-classic way. Dickens' famous novella of selfless giving, redemption and the "holiday spirit" will be presented as a musical at 7 p.m. Monday, Dec. 12. Members of Troupe America Inc., the traveling theater company that is staging the production, say the twist to Dickens' story is a hit with audiences....
OPINION
By ALLAN POWELL | December 16, 2010
How many times have you heard that you were “gonna get the dickens” from someone? What kind of punishment came with “the dickens”? Did you ever inquire about the origin of “dickens”?   I once was told that “dickens” came from writer Charles Dickens, who wrote scathing articles scolding government, businesses and individuals who polluted the air, water or ground; exploited children; tolerated slums; or were greedy. I later discovered that “dickens” was a name used to refer to the devil, long before Charles Dickens was born.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 20, 2012
1. Hagerstown holiday Hagerstown Municipal Band and the Barbara Ingram School for the Arts Wind Band will present a concert at 3:30 p.m. Sunday, Dec. 23, at The Maryland Theatre, 21 S. Potomac St., downtown Hagerstown. Free admission; donations accepted. Call 301-790-2000. 2. 'God bless us everyone' Devan Whitacre will portray Charles Dickens telling "A Christmas Story" at 7 p.m. Saturday, Dec. 22, at The Priory, 219 S. George St., Charles Town, W.Va. Love offering.
NEWS
By Robert A. "Bob" Poor | December 30, 2009
With no question to answer for December, and with thoughts on the holiday season, it should be appropriate to remember something about the second greatest Christmas story ever told. There have been scores of editions and translations, and many stage, television and film adaptations, making "A Christmas Carol" one of the best-loved stories of all time. It seems that on an early October evening in 1843, as he stepped from his home near Regent's Park, Charles Dickens was deeply troubled.
OPINION
By ALLAN POWELL | February 25, 2011
There are rewards to writers for each genre of writing, be it history, poetry, biography, investigative reporters or columnists. The immediate response for weekly articles, while sometimes harsh, can be most gratifying. A recent column about the life of novelist Charles Dickens was especially appreciated. Toward the end of January, my wife Joanie and I received an invitation to have lunch with retired engineer and businessman Robert Molten. He then made it known that he had a surprise for us. It turned out that Bob had a hobby of binding books and he had three samples of his craftsmanship to share.
SPORTS
By BOB PARASILITI | bobp@herald-mail.com | January 15, 2012
It takes a lot to scare the dickens out of someone. Sporting events aren't like exorcisms. The devil will make fans do a lot of really questionable things, but in most cases, the games aren't all that life-changing. That certainly goes for South Hagerstown and Clear Spring's midseason boys basketball game on Wednesday. On the surface, there wasn't anything all that shocking about the Rebels' 68-51 victory, outside of a 16-1 advantage in the second quarter. To be truly honest, the outcome is about what most would have expected.
OPINION
July 26, 2013
Author Kathleen Sharp is very deserving of the plaudits for her masterful portrayal of a complicated and controversial subject. Indeed, one critic rated “Blood Medicine” to be the “best nonfiction book of the past 20 years.” Yet, this book reads more like a Charles Dickens novel with its abundant cast of failed human beings. There are few heroes in this sordid story of so many members of the medical profession who gave way to material gain at the expense of ethical judgment. The medicine of interest was epo (epoetin alpha)
NEWS
December 5, 1997
By CLYDE FORD Staff Writer, Charles Town HARPERS FERRY, W.Va. - Charles Dickens, whose books created many of the Christmas images of close families and good cheer, kicked his wife out of their house, forbade his daughters to visit her and kept a mistress. Dickens also did not follow the Christian beliefs behind Christmas, said Roger Jerome, an actor and historian who will present "A Dickens of a Christmas" Saturday at Harpers Ferry National Historical Park. "It was a well-kept secret in the Victorian era," Jerome said.
OPINION
By ALLAN POWELL | March 22, 2013
Hardly more than a year ago, I made my first contact with “Little Dorrit” when I read a newly published biography of Charles Dickens. Then, a friend, the late Robert Molten, bound several editions of Harper's Magazine (1856) into three bound books about “Little Dorrit.” Most recently, my daughter, Sherry, brought four discs about Dickens' famous hero which gave me a visual acquaintance. I now know the meaning of the phrase, “You're gonna get the Dickens.” The scenes of the sordid and squalid conditions of the working class in the 1850s reactivated memories and thoughts about the plight of laborers throughout history.
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OPINION
July 26, 2013
Author Kathleen Sharp is very deserving of the plaudits for her masterful portrayal of a complicated and controversial subject. Indeed, one critic rated “Blood Medicine” to be the “best nonfiction book of the past 20 years.” Yet, this book reads more like a Charles Dickens novel with its abundant cast of failed human beings. There are few heroes in this sordid story of so many members of the medical profession who gave way to material gain at the expense of ethical judgment. The medicine of interest was epo (epoetin alpha)
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OPINION
By ALLAN POWELL | March 22, 2013
Hardly more than a year ago, I made my first contact with “Little Dorrit” when I read a newly published biography of Charles Dickens. Then, a friend, the late Robert Molten, bound several editions of Harper's Magazine (1856) into three bound books about “Little Dorrit.” Most recently, my daughter, Sherry, brought four discs about Dickens' famous hero which gave me a visual acquaintance. I now know the meaning of the phrase, “You're gonna get the Dickens.” The scenes of the sordid and squalid conditions of the working class in the 1850s reactivated memories and thoughts about the plight of laborers throughout history.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 20, 2012
1. Hagerstown holiday Hagerstown Municipal Band and the Barbara Ingram School for the Arts Wind Band will present a concert at 3:30 p.m. Sunday, Dec. 23, at The Maryland Theatre, 21 S. Potomac St., downtown Hagerstown. Free admission; donations accepted. Call 301-790-2000. 2. 'God bless us everyone' Devan Whitacre will portray Charles Dickens telling "A Christmas Story" at 7 p.m. Saturday, Dec. 22, at The Priory, 219 S. George St., Charles Town, W.Va. Love offering.
SPORTS
By BOB PARASILITI | bobp@herald-mail.com | January 15, 2012
It takes a lot to scare the dickens out of someone. Sporting events aren't like exorcisms. The devil will make fans do a lot of really questionable things, but in most cases, the games aren't all that life-changing. That certainly goes for South Hagerstown and Clear Spring's midseason boys basketball game on Wednesday. On the surface, there wasn't anything all that shocking about the Rebels' 68-51 victory, outside of a 16-1 advantage in the second quarter. To be truly honest, the outcome is about what most would have expected.
OPINION
By ALLAN POWELL | February 25, 2011
There are rewards to writers for each genre of writing, be it history, poetry, biography, investigative reporters or columnists. The immediate response for weekly articles, while sometimes harsh, can be most gratifying. A recent column about the life of novelist Charles Dickens was especially appreciated. Toward the end of January, my wife Joanie and I received an invitation to have lunch with retired engineer and businessman Robert Molten. He then made it known that he had a surprise for us. It turned out that Bob had a hobby of binding books and he had three samples of his craftsmanship to share.
NEWS
By DAVE MCMILLION | davem@herald-mail.com | December 19, 2010
For a moment Sunday, a small corner of Hagerstown was moved to another time, when flaming Christmas pudding, some tea and a Christmas tale about ghosts were standard offerings. It happened at The Women’s Club, which was an appropriate backdrop for a tribute to English author Charles Dickens and his classic story “A Christmas Carol,” published in 1843. The home at 31 S. Prospect St. with its high ceilings and rooms resembling Victorian parlors from Dickens’ days blended with hosts serving a welcoming glass of sherry and treats like homemade scones.
OPINION
By ALLAN POWELL | December 16, 2010
How many times have you heard that you were “gonna get the dickens” from someone? What kind of punishment came with “the dickens”? Did you ever inquire about the origin of “dickens”?   I once was told that “dickens” came from writer Charles Dickens, who wrote scathing articles scolding government, businesses and individuals who polluted the air, water or ground; exploited children; tolerated slums; or were greedy. I later discovered that “dickens” was a name used to refer to the devil, long before Charles Dickens was born.
NEWS
By Robert A. "Bob" Poor | December 30, 2009
With no question to answer for December, and with thoughts on the holiday season, it should be appropriate to remember something about the second greatest Christmas story ever told. There have been scores of editions and translations, and many stage, television and film adaptations, making "A Christmas Carol" one of the best-loved stories of all time. It seems that on an early October evening in 1843, as he stepped from his home near Regent's Park, Charles Dickens was deeply troubled.
NEWS
by KRISTIN WILSON | December 8, 2005
´ kristinw@herald-mail.com Charles Dickens' classic "A Christmas Carol" is coming to The Maryland Theatre stage in a slightly not-so-classic way. Dickens' famous novella of selfless giving, redemption and the "holiday spirit" will be presented as a musical at 7 p.m. Monday, Dec. 12. Members of Troupe America Inc., the traveling theater company that is staging the production, say the twist to Dickens' story is a hit with audiences....
NEWS
December 5, 1997
By CLYDE FORD Staff Writer, Charles Town HARPERS FERRY, W.Va. - Charles Dickens, whose books created many of the Christmas images of close families and good cheer, kicked his wife out of their house, forbade his daughters to visit her and kept a mistress. Dickens also did not follow the Christian beliefs behind Christmas, said Roger Jerome, an actor and historian who will present "A Dickens of a Christmas" Saturday at Harpers Ferry National Historical Park. "It was a well-kept secret in the Victorian era," Jerome said.
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