Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: HeraldMail HomeCollectionsCessna
IN THE NEWS

Cessna

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
February 5, 2007
New aircraft exhibits are being installed, and additional displays are planned at the Hagerstown Aviation Museum. One of the new displays includes a Cessna 150 that has been prepared for hands-on, interactive display. Tracey Potter, museum member and president of Hagerstown Aircraft Services Inc., donated the aircraft. Potter's company provided all the volunteer labor and materials, and converted the plane to a museum-ready, child-friendly interactive exhibit. The plane was partially disassembled and then reassembled, making sure that all aspects of the plane are safe for young people to explore.
NEWS
January 27, 2001
Missing plane's wreckage, pilot's body found FAIRMONT, W.Va. (AP) - Searchers on Saturday found the body of a pilot whose home-built plane crashed nearly a week ago in a wooded, hilly area of Taylor County. The pilot's name was being withheld pending notification of relatives, said Capt. Kay Joslin Walling with the Maryland Civil Air Patrol. Rescue crews from the West Virginia Civil Air Patrol found the Wittman Tailwind Model DN-1 Experimental Aircraft at about 4 p.m. Saturday north of State Route 310 at Plum Run, near the Taylor-Marion county line a few miles outside Fairmont, said Civil Air Patrol spokesman Jeff Schrock.
NEWS
January 29, 2001
Dead pilot identified Authorities have identified the pilot killed in a crash about a week ago near Grafton, W. Va., as Richard Hemion, 68, of Mantoloking, N.J. Trooper Wayne Vessels, of the West Virginia State Police at Grafton barrack, said members of the West Virginia Civil Air Patrol found the downed home-built Wittman Tailwind Model DN-1 Experimental Aircraft at about 3:30 p.m. in wooded hillside near Grafton. Hemion crashed north of State Route 310 at Plum Run, near the Taylor-Marion county line, authorities said.
NEWS
By RICHARD F. BELISLE | January 8, 2000
WAYNESBORO, Pa. - About two years ago Waynesboro artist Landis Whitsel walked away from the crash of a low-powered airplane he built in his garage. Undaunted by his brush with death in September 1997 when the 40-horsepower engine quit over a field near Rouzerville, Pa., Whitsel, 51, went out and bought a 1991 Aero Sport, a 180-horsepower aerobatic stunt plane. Whitsel said he feels safe flying the swift, maneuverable little bi-plane because he spent a week learning aerobatics in an Arizona flying school.
NEWS
by Alicia Notarianni | July 18, 2004
alician@herald-mail.com Dozens of aviation hobbyists flew into Hagerstown Regional Airport Saturday morning for a $100 hamburger. Ken Jones of Waynesboro, Pa., a member of Chapter 36 of the Experimental Aircraft Association, said the "$100 hamburger" is a running joke among experimental airplane pilots and builders who build airplanes and don't have anywhere in particular to fly them. Hobbyists end up traveling by airplane to fly-in fund-raising events throughout the region and spending a couple of dollars on breakfast or lunch, and far more on fuel and maintenance of airplanes.
NEWS
July 23, 2009
MARTINSBURG, W.Va. -- Launching rockets, building a circuit board, taking the controls of a light aircraft simulator and studying Isaac Newton's three laws of motion. These and other science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) activities exercised the brainpower of 20 children attending a four-day STARBASE Kids Camp at the 167th Airlift Wing in Martinsburg, which wrapped up Thursday. The STARBASE Kids Camp was open to children -- in fourth to eighth grades -- who had family members assigned to the 167th Airlift Wing.
NEWS
By BRIGITTE GREWE / Pulse Correspondent | June 10, 2008
Imagine soaring in the air in a small plane, leaving your worries behind and sailing through the sky. That's what I did this week. I flew a Cessna 172, a small single-engine airplane, at the Hagerstown Aviation Academy. I was with academy owner and instructor Evan Smith, who sat down with me and talked to me about his life as an aircraft instructor and about his school before he took me up to fly. Smith, 45, is the youngest of three siblings. His parents wanted him to become a physician like his father.
NEWS
by SARAH JOHNSTON | June 20, 2006
"As a pilot grows older, his stories get bigger and his facts get smaller," teased Gil Pascal of Clarksville, Md. This remark was met with an uproar of laughter, so explosive that it drowned out the hum of engines and whir of propellers. Spirits soared at the Father's Day Fly-in on Sunday, June 18, at the Rider Jet Center in Hagerstown. General manager Kevin Benner views the event as a wonderful opportunity to show appreciation to both customers and locals. The fly-in features airplane and helicopter rides, and is an exhilarating bonding experience for fathers and their children.
NEWS
by TARA REILLY | September 24, 2005
tarar@herald-mail.com I'd be fibbing if I said I wasn't scared. Like many people, I've flown in a commercial jet, where you get peanuts and drinks, and it's easy to forget you're in the air. But actually being behind the controls in a small, four-seat Cessna is a whole different game. I met Eagle Air chief flight instructor Jennifer Brandau on Friday at Rider Jet Center at Hagerstown Regional Airport for a free introductory flight lesson through the BE A PILOT program.
NEWS
by Cheryl M. Keyser | July 14, 2005
The sky will be filled with clearly identifiable flying objects Saturday, July 16, and Sunday, July 17, as the seventh annual Hagerstown Aircraft Services Fly-in and Fairchild Family Reunion attracts pilots, aircraft, former aviation employees and aviation buffs. On both days, free 20-minute plane rides for children ages 8 to 17 in four-passenger Cessna or Piper aircraft will be conducted by pilots with Chapter 36 of the Experimental Aircraft Association. Passengers will receive a certificate identifying them as participants in the EAA's Young Eagle program.
ARTICLES BY DATE
OBITUARIES
By JANET HEIM | janeth@herald-mail.com | December 10, 2010
Raised on a farm with a strong work ethic and a knack for all things mechanical, Thurman Sizer “T.S.” Alphin was known for working with his hands and rarely being idle. He also developed a love of airplanes. “He loved fixing things,” Mary Beth Alphin said of her father, an aircraft mechanic and inspector who founded Alphin Aircraft. “He wanted us to share his love of flying,” Mary Beth said. “He was fortunate that his vocation was his avocation.
Advertisement
NEWS
July 23, 2009
MARTINSBURG, W.Va. -- Launching rockets, building a circuit board, taking the controls of a light aircraft simulator and studying Isaac Newton's three laws of motion. These and other science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) activities exercised the brainpower of 20 children attending a four-day STARBASE Kids Camp at the 167th Airlift Wing in Martinsburg, which wrapped up Thursday. The STARBASE Kids Camp was open to children -- in fourth to eighth grades -- who had family members assigned to the 167th Airlift Wing.
NEWS
By BRIGITTE GREWE / Pulse Correspondent | June 10, 2008
Imagine soaring in the air in a small plane, leaving your worries behind and sailing through the sky. That's what I did this week. I flew a Cessna 172, a small single-engine airplane, at the Hagerstown Aviation Academy. I was with academy owner and instructor Evan Smith, who sat down with me and talked to me about his life as an aircraft instructor and about his school before he took me up to fly. Smith, 45, is the youngest of three siblings. His parents wanted him to become a physician like his father.
NEWS
February 5, 2007
New aircraft exhibits are being installed, and additional displays are planned at the Hagerstown Aviation Museum. One of the new displays includes a Cessna 150 that has been prepared for hands-on, interactive display. Tracey Potter, museum member and president of Hagerstown Aircraft Services Inc., donated the aircraft. Potter's company provided all the volunteer labor and materials, and converted the plane to a museum-ready, child-friendly interactive exhibit. The plane was partially disassembled and then reassembled, making sure that all aspects of the plane are safe for young people to explore.
NEWS
by SARAH JOHNSTON | June 20, 2006
"As a pilot grows older, his stories get bigger and his facts get smaller," teased Gil Pascal of Clarksville, Md. This remark was met with an uproar of laughter, so explosive that it drowned out the hum of engines and whir of propellers. Spirits soared at the Father's Day Fly-in on Sunday, June 18, at the Rider Jet Center in Hagerstown. General manager Kevin Benner views the event as a wonderful opportunity to show appreciation to both customers and locals. The fly-in features airplane and helicopter rides, and is an exhilarating bonding experience for fathers and their children.
NEWS
by TARA REILLY | September 24, 2005
tarar@herald-mail.com I'd be fibbing if I said I wasn't scared. Like many people, I've flown in a commercial jet, where you get peanuts and drinks, and it's easy to forget you're in the air. But actually being behind the controls in a small, four-seat Cessna is a whole different game. I met Eagle Air chief flight instructor Jennifer Brandau on Friday at Rider Jet Center at Hagerstown Regional Airport for a free introductory flight lesson through the BE A PILOT program.
NEWS
by Cheryl M. Keyser | July 14, 2005
The sky will be filled with clearly identifiable flying objects Saturday, July 16, and Sunday, July 17, as the seventh annual Hagerstown Aircraft Services Fly-in and Fairchild Family Reunion attracts pilots, aircraft, former aviation employees and aviation buffs. On both days, free 20-minute plane rides for children ages 8 to 17 in four-passenger Cessna or Piper aircraft will be conducted by pilots with Chapter 36 of the Experimental Aircraft Association. Passengers will receive a certificate identifying them as participants in the EAA's Young Eagle program.
NEWS
by Alicia Notarianni | July 18, 2004
alician@herald-mail.com Dozens of aviation hobbyists flew into Hagerstown Regional Airport Saturday morning for a $100 hamburger. Ken Jones of Waynesboro, Pa., a member of Chapter 36 of the Experimental Aircraft Association, said the "$100 hamburger" is a running joke among experimental airplane pilots and builders who build airplanes and don't have anywhere in particular to fly them. Hobbyists end up traveling by airplane to fly-in fund-raising events throughout the region and spending a couple of dollars on breakfast or lunch, and far more on fuel and maintenance of airplanes.
NEWS
January 29, 2001
Dead pilot identified Authorities have identified the pilot killed in a crash about a week ago near Grafton, W. Va., as Richard Hemion, 68, of Mantoloking, N.J. Trooper Wayne Vessels, of the West Virginia State Police at Grafton barrack, said members of the West Virginia Civil Air Patrol found the downed home-built Wittman Tailwind Model DN-1 Experimental Aircraft at about 3:30 p.m. in wooded hillside near Grafton. Hemion crashed north of State Route 310 at Plum Run, near the Taylor-Marion county line, authorities said.
NEWS
January 27, 2001
Missing plane's wreckage, pilot's body found FAIRMONT, W.Va. (AP) - Searchers on Saturday found the body of a pilot whose home-built plane crashed nearly a week ago in a wooded, hilly area of Taylor County. The pilot's name was being withheld pending notification of relatives, said Capt. Kay Joslin Walling with the Maryland Civil Air Patrol. Rescue crews from the West Virginia Civil Air Patrol found the Wittman Tailwind Model DN-1 Experimental Aircraft at about 4 p.m. Saturday north of State Route 310 at Plum Run, near the Taylor-Marion county line a few miles outside Fairmont, said Civil Air Patrol spokesman Jeff Schrock.
The Herald-Mail Articles
|