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By MARIE GILBERT | marieg@herald-mail.com | March 26, 2012
If you could outsmart cancer, would you do it? What if you were told it would only take a few minutes of your time and it could save your life? It's possible through screenings - the best weapons in the early detection of a wide scope of cancers. For women, in particular, studies have shown that regular mammograms and pap tests have contributed to the decline in deaths related to breast and cervical cancer. But if you're uninsured or underinsured, such screenings often fall by the wayside.
LIFESTYLE
January 25, 2013
Cervical cancer is the second-leading cause of cancer deaths among women worldwide, yet it is almost always preventable with the Pap test. Cervical cancer grows slowly, as abnormal cells begin to change into a pre-cancerous state. For some women, pre-cancerous changes go away without treatment. For others, the condition needs to be treated so cancer doesn't develop. Women should start getting regular Pap tests at age 21. It is important for you to continue getting a Pap test regularly.
NEWS
by TARA REILLY | January 10, 2007
Grant accepted to fight gang activity The Washington County Commissioners on Tuesday accepted a $109,318 grant to help combat gang activity in the county. The grant will pay for an officer with the Hagerstown Police Department to be assigned to a gang task force for a year and help develop strategies to prevent gang activity, according to information provided by the county. Sheriff Douglas Mullendore said the City of Hagerstown also would be asked to approve the grant.
NEWS
January 25, 2002
January 24, 2002 A simple test that could save your life by Bob Maginnis About six months ago I received a letter from a woman who said her daughter was due to undergo breast cancer surgery in just two days. The daughter, a waitress, had no medical insurance, she said, and her mom asked if the paper would print an appeal for donations. Let me see what we can do, I told her. I called Y-Me, the local non-profit founded to help breast cancer victims. They directed me to the Washington County Health Department's Diagnostic and Treatment Program, a federally funded initiative that provides free screening and care to women who meet the income guidelines.
NEWS
September 7, 2000
Middle-age tests: Cancer screenings Breast cancer American Cancer Society estimates there will be 182,800 new cases and 40,800 deaths from breast cancer in 2000. Mammograms have been credited with early detection of more breast cancer and reducing the number of deaths from the disease. There is debate and some controversy about when women should begin having mammograms. American Cancer Society recommends women begin annual mammograms at 40. American Medical Association recommends the screening for women ages 40 to 49 every one to two years and once a year after age 50. U.S. Clinical Preventive Services Task Force recommends annual mammograms at age 50. Talk to your doctor about screenings earlier if your family history warrants it. There is little disagreement, however, that all women - American Cancer Society sets the starting line at age 20 - should do monthly self-examination of their breasts and have their breasts examined every three years by a health-care provider.
NEWS
September 19, 1997
By VANDANA SINHA Staff Writer People who indulge in promiscuous unprotected sex are putting themselves at risk for catching viruses that can be as deadly as AIDS. One viral sexually transmitted disease in particular, human papilloma virus, or HPV, is evident in local patients "by the boatload," and is linked to cervical cancer, said Dr. George Manger, a Hagerstown physician who has specialized in gynecology for 22 years. There are more than 30 types of bacterial and viral STDs, some of which cannot be killed by current medicine.
OPINION
August 1, 2012
Family should be compensated for cells To the editor: In 1951, a woman became the source of the first immortal cell line (HeLa), which was obtained from biopsies performed during her treatment for cervical cancer, at Johns Hopkins University, as reported in “The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks,” by Rebecca Skloot. Her physicians did not ask her consent before using her tissue for research. However, the cell line became extremely lucrative for the university, providing a lot of revenue, estimated to be in hundred millions of dollars.
NEWS
by CANDICE BOSELY | June 25, 2005
martinsburg@herald-mail.com SHENANDOAH JUNCTION, W.Va. - You might say the Force was with Dennis Carmickle. Dressed as Star Wars character Obi-Wan Kenobi, Carmickle was one of the hundreds of people who participated Friday night in Jefferson County's Relay for Life, an American Cancer Society fundraiser. Carmickle is a seven-year survivor of Hodgkin's disease. He and other participants in the Relay for Life were scheduled to spend the night at Jefferson High School's football field/track complex.
NEWS
By ROXANN MILLER | roxann.miller@herald-mail.com | June 15, 2012
Barbara Kaczmarek drove four hours from Pittsburgh, Pa., to walk in the American Cancer Society's Relay for Life of Chambersburg just to support her friend.  Kacmarek's friend, Tamee Havrilla, who lives in Chambersburg, Pa., is a breast cancer survivor.  “I got sponsors in Pittsburgh, and I took off work because I wanted to be here to support her,” Kaczmarek said as she walked around the half-mile paved path at Norlo Park.  “Life is precious, and we don't think about that.
ARTICLES BY DATE
LIFESTYLE
January 25, 2013
Cervical cancer is the second-leading cause of cancer deaths among women worldwide, yet it is almost always preventable with the Pap test. Cervical cancer grows slowly, as abnormal cells begin to change into a pre-cancerous state. For some women, pre-cancerous changes go away without treatment. For others, the condition needs to be treated so cancer doesn't develop. Women should start getting regular Pap tests at age 21. It is important for you to continue getting a Pap test regularly.
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OPINION
August 1, 2012
Family should be compensated for cells To the editor: In 1951, a woman became the source of the first immortal cell line (HeLa), which was obtained from biopsies performed during her treatment for cervical cancer, at Johns Hopkins University, as reported in “The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks,” by Rebecca Skloot. Her physicians did not ask her consent before using her tissue for research. However, the cell line became extremely lucrative for the university, providing a lot of revenue, estimated to be in hundred millions of dollars.
NEWS
By ROXANN MILLER | roxann.miller@herald-mail.com | June 15, 2012
Barbara Kaczmarek drove four hours from Pittsburgh, Pa., to walk in the American Cancer Society's Relay for Life of Chambersburg just to support her friend.  Kacmarek's friend, Tamee Havrilla, who lives in Chambersburg, Pa., is a breast cancer survivor.  “I got sponsors in Pittsburgh, and I took off work because I wanted to be here to support her,” Kaczmarek said as she walked around the half-mile paved path at Norlo Park.  “Life is precious, and we don't think about that.
LIFESTYLE
By MARIE GILBERT | marieg@herald-mail.com | March 26, 2012
If you could outsmart cancer, would you do it? What if you were told it would only take a few minutes of your time and it could save your life? It's possible through screenings - the best weapons in the early detection of a wide scope of cancers. For women, in particular, studies have shown that regular mammograms and pap tests have contributed to the decline in deaths related to breast and cervical cancer. But if you're uninsured or underinsured, such screenings often fall by the wayside.
NEWS
By JOSHUA BOWMAN | January 16, 2008
Arts school asks county for money The Contemporary School of Arts and Gallery Inc. on Tuesday asked the Washington County Commissioners for $30,000 in the county's fiscal year 2009 budget. The school at 4 W. Franklin St. in Hagerstown offers after-school programs targeted at children in low- to middle-income families, according to Ron Lytle, president of the school's board. It also offers an art gallery and outreach programs. Lytle said the school has received some grants but needs the county's help to stay competitive.
NEWS
by TIFFANY ARNOLD | June 23, 2006
FREDERICK, MD. By the fifth day on the job, the high school senior knew how to clip DNA for insertion into bacteria cells. His fellow intern, another high school student, knew how to copy portions of DNA. The Washington County students hope their work, part of a yearlong internship program at the National Cancer Institute in Frederick, will help in the ongoing efforts to find a cure for cancer. "What I might discover might help someone else," said intern Atlee Baker, 17, of Hagerstown.
NEWS
by CANDICE BOSELY | June 25, 2005
martinsburg@herald-mail.com SHENANDOAH JUNCTION, W.Va. - You might say the Force was with Dennis Carmickle. Dressed as Star Wars character Obi-Wan Kenobi, Carmickle was one of the hundreds of people who participated Friday night in Jefferson County's Relay for Life, an American Cancer Society fundraiser. Carmickle is a seven-year survivor of Hodgkin's disease. He and other participants in the Relay for Life were scheduled to spend the night at Jefferson High School's football field/track complex.
NEWS
by ANDREA ROWLAND | June 30, 2003
andrear@herald-mail.com There's more than one way to thwart a wart. You can freeze them and fry them, file them and ignore them. You can even cover them with duct tape. The handyman's helper might be as effective in getting rid of warts as more uncomfortable treatment options, health experts say. Warts are noncancerous skin growths caused by various strains of human papillomavirus that enter the skin through tiny breaks. Warts look different depending upon what part of the body they affect, and which strain of the virus is involved.
NEWS
January 25, 2002
January 24, 2002 A simple test that could save your life by Bob Maginnis About six months ago I received a letter from a woman who said her daughter was due to undergo breast cancer surgery in just two days. The daughter, a waitress, had no medical insurance, she said, and her mom asked if the paper would print an appeal for donations. Let me see what we can do, I told her. I called Y-Me, the local non-profit founded to help breast cancer victims. They directed me to the Washington County Health Department's Diagnostic and Treatment Program, a federally funded initiative that provides free screening and care to women who meet the income guidelines.
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