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Cellular Tower

NEWS
by ANDREW SCHOTZ | August 5, 2003
Hangar is proposed at regional airport A new 22,500-square-foot hangar has been proposed at Hagerstown Regional Airport, a county planning official said Monday. Senior Planner Lisa Kelly Pietro told the Washington County Planning Commission that the hangar would be on the east side of Henson Boulevard. The county would lease land to the developer for the hangar, she said. About five planes would use the hangar each day, Pietro said. The planning commission approved a site plan for the hangar, except for commission member Robert Ernst II, who abstained.
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NEWS
February 5, 2001
Boonsboro rejects cell tower By TARA REILLY / Staff Writer BOONSBORO - Boonsboro residents won't have to worry about a cellular tower being built in town. Mayor Charles "Skip" Kauffman Jr. announced at a Boonsboro meeting Monday night that the town is no longer interested in erecting the tower near the reservoir on Boonsboro Mountain Road. "This is a done deal for the Mayor and Council," Kauffman told the crowd of about 30 people who showed up expecting to fight the tower.
NEWS
January 8, 1998
W.Va. cellular tower accord may be in sight By CLYDE FORD Staff Writer, Charles Town HARPERS FERRY, W.Va. - U.S. Cellular officials met amicably Wednesday with opponents of their plan to build a 260-foot-high communication tower in the middle of a Civil War battlefield just outside Harpers Ferry National Historical Park. U.S. Cellular and park officials said they agreed to examine possible alternative sites to determine whether they would enable the company to provide cellular phone service while not marring the Blue Ridge Mountain scenery.
NEWS
December 17, 1997
Cellular towers hard to disguise By CLYDE FORD Staff Writer, Charles Town CHARLES TOWN, W.Va. - The project manager for a planned 260-foot-high cellular phone tower next to Harpers Ferry, W.Va., said there is no way to make the tower less intrusive. "It's difficult when you have a tower to disguise it. It is what it is," said Markham L. Gartley, project manager for U.S. Cellular. At an October meeting with the Jefferson County Planning Commission, Gartley said there were ways to make the towers less intrusive, including putting them on existing structures such as church steeples, water towers, or by designing them in ways that they did not look like steel towers.
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