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NEWS
By DAVE MCMILLION | davem@herald-mail.com | November 12, 2012
The annual Woolly Bear Caterpillar Contest might have been on the verge of extinction this year, but kids seemed as excited as ever about the contest, according to organizers, who received more than 300 entries. The contest coincides with the common fall sightings of the woolly bear caterpillar, which can be seen on just about any road or sidewalk this time of the year. It is said that certain characteristics of the caterpillar can be used to forecast the severity of the coming winter.
NEWS
October 12, 2009
HAGERSTOWN -- The Hagers-Town Town and Country Almanack is holding its annual woolly bear caterpillar contest this month. The contest runs through Oct. 30. Entries will be accepted for the "cutest and cuddliest" and the "biggest and woolliest. " All entries should be taken to 1120 Professional Court, second floor, Hagerstown. The office is open Monday through Friday from 8:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. The person who submits the winning entry in each category will receive $100.
OPINION
October 1, 2012
Oh no, say it ain't so. The Hagers-Town Town and Country Almanack has announced that its celebrated woolly bear competition will go the way of the typewriter, Pontiac, soda can pull-tabs, Flip Wilson, false eyelashes and (if there is any justice in the world, after Nov. 6) Crossroads GPS. The way of Burger Chef, wood paneling, bicycle banana seats, Ouija boards, afros, liner notes, corporal punishment, Green Stamps, Carnation Instant Breakfast and - everywhere except Washington County - raccoon tails affixed to automobile antennae.
NEWS
by DON AINES | January 31, 2007
The pile of bricks and rubble this Caterpillar is sitting on had been home to the Famous Hot Weiner Lunch, which closed last year. The three-story building at 90-92 N. Main St. in Chambersburg, Pa., which also had two floors of apartments, was purchased by King Street United Brethren in Christ Church and will be used for parking space, said Ken Adams, the church's business manager.
NEWS
By RICHARD F. BELISLE, Waynesboro | June 29, 1998
McCONNELLSBURG. Pa. - Just 21/2 years ago, Fulton Precision Industries Inc. consisted of partners Walter Barmont and Gregory G. Fuller, and their wives. "We did everything ourselves," said Barmont, 30. Three months later, the partners hired their first two employees. Last week, state Sen. Robert C. Jubelirer, R-Fulton, said Fulton Industries was awarded $35,000 in state tax credits. The company will receive up to a $1,000 tax break for every new permanent employee it hires at salaries at least 150 percent of minimum wage over the next three years.
NEWS
By BOB KESSLER | September 27, 2008
If you grow pine, spruce, fir or hemlock trees, you should be aware of spider mites. If you have seen yellow needles on your tree that are mottled in appearance, this is probably from spider mites. To check for spider mites, take a plain sheet of white paper and place it under the branches of your trees and give the branch a sharp tap. Now look at the debris that fell on the paper. If you see dirt specks that start to move, then you likely have spider mites. To control spider mites, you should use 3- or 4-percent horticultural oil. You can get horticultural oil at most garden centers.
NEWS
By ANDREW SCHOTZ | November 3, 2007
A black-and-fuzzy tradition returned to Washington County after a year of hibernation - woolly bear judging. The Hagers-Town Town and Country Almanack canceled its annual caterpillar contest last year because of low participation. Business Manager Jerry Spessard said the number of entries had dropped enormously, from around 800 to about 20. The Washington County school system hardly participates anymore, he said. The Almanack tried again this year, though, and got 76 entries.
NEWS
June 24, 2005
The Hagerstown Town and Country Almanack is being distributed at local visitor and welcome centers, courtesy of the Hagerstown-Washington County Convention and Visitors Bureau and The Gruber Almanack Company in Hagerstown. Free copies of the Almanack are available at the Visitor Welcome Center in downtown Hagerstown. The CVB also distributes the Almanack to convention attendees in Washington County throughout the year. The Hagerstown Town and Country Almanack is an annual publication that serves as a source for regional weather predictions, useful household and farm information, and insights into everyday living.
NEWS
By BRIDGET DiCOSMO | November 3, 2009
When 5-year-old Reagan Carbaugh combed his family's 400-acre farm in Clear Spring for a prize-winning woolly bear caterpillar to submit to the The Hagers-Town Town and Country Almanack's annual contest, his sister, Val, helped with the search. Together, they collected a handful of the fuzzy creatures to turn into the woolly bear headquarters. Reagan's plump, fuzzy contestant, whom he has yet to name, earned the title of "cutest and cuddliest" in this year's contest. The prize, worth $100 cash for Reagan, means he's following in the footsteps of his 11-year-old sister, Kimberly, who won the same category in the contest two years ago. Reagan said he plans to spend his prize money on Lego building blocks.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By DAVE MCMILLION | davem@herald-mail.com | November 12, 2012
The annual Woolly Bear Caterpillar Contest might have been on the verge of extinction this year, but kids seemed as excited as ever about the contest, according to organizers, who received more than 300 entries. The contest coincides with the common fall sightings of the woolly bear caterpillar, which can be seen on just about any road or sidewalk this time of the year. It is said that certain characteristics of the caterpillar can be used to forecast the severity of the coming winter.
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OPINION
October 1, 2012
Oh no, say it ain't so. The Hagers-Town Town and Country Almanack has announced that its celebrated woolly bear competition will go the way of the typewriter, Pontiac, soda can pull-tabs, Flip Wilson, false eyelashes and (if there is any justice in the world, after Nov. 6) Crossroads GPS. The way of Burger Chef, wood paneling, bicycle banana seats, Ouija boards, afros, liner notes, corporal punishment, Green Stamps, Carnation Instant Breakfast and - everywhere except Washington County - raccoon tails affixed to automobile antennae.
NEWS
By BRIDGET DiCOSMO | November 3, 2009
When 5-year-old Reagan Carbaugh combed his family's 400-acre farm in Clear Spring for a prize-winning woolly bear caterpillar to submit to the The Hagers-Town Town and Country Almanack's annual contest, his sister, Val, helped with the search. Together, they collected a handful of the fuzzy creatures to turn into the woolly bear headquarters. Reagan's plump, fuzzy contestant, whom he has yet to name, earned the title of "cutest and cuddliest" in this year's contest. The prize, worth $100 cash for Reagan, means he's following in the footsteps of his 11-year-old sister, Kimberly, who won the same category in the contest two years ago. Reagan said he plans to spend his prize money on Lego building blocks.
NEWS
October 12, 2009
HAGERSTOWN -- The Hagers-Town Town and Country Almanack is holding its annual woolly bear caterpillar contest this month. The contest runs through Oct. 30. Entries will be accepted for the "cutest and cuddliest" and the "biggest and woolliest. " All entries should be taken to 1120 Professional Court, second floor, Hagerstown. The office is open Monday through Friday from 8:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. The person who submits the winning entry in each category will receive $100.
NEWS
By AUBREY BOYD / Special to Pulse | February 17, 2009
Far away in the beautiful Amazon rain forest, a tiny caterpillar wiggled along the forest floor. Her real name had long been forgotten, for most of the forest creatures only knew her as Ugly, Ugly the Caterpillar. Day in and day out, she crept along the forest floor and did what caterpillars do best - eat. Surprisingly, the eating was not her favorite part, but instead she enjoyed the many animals she would meet along the way. Sometimes, she would stop to talk with beetle, help worm dig or share a leaf with snail.
NEWS
By BOB KESSLER | September 27, 2008
If you grow pine, spruce, fir or hemlock trees, you should be aware of spider mites. If you have seen yellow needles on your tree that are mottled in appearance, this is probably from spider mites. To check for spider mites, take a plain sheet of white paper and place it under the branches of your trees and give the branch a sharp tap. Now look at the debris that fell on the paper. If you see dirt specks that start to move, then you likely have spider mites. To control spider mites, you should use 3- or 4-percent horticultural oil. You can get horticultural oil at most garden centers.
NEWS
July 15, 2008
Was bulldozer attack truly a 'senseless' act? To the editor: Perhaps you saw The Herald-Mail story about the Palestinian laborer who, early in July, rammed Jerusalem buses with a bulldozer. According to the report, Israel called the attack a "senseless act. " That struck me as an odd thing for Israel to say - the state that wrote the book on using armored bulldozers as tools of aggression; the country that inspired human-rights organizations worldwide to boycott Caterpillar.
NEWS
By LYN WIDMYER | April 13, 2008
If I had my choice of facing Mothman or a voracious band of gypsy moths, I would take Mothman every time. Mothman, for those unfamiliar with unexplained and unearthly phenomena, is a creature who used to hang around Point Pleasant, W. Va. In 1966, several people reported seeing a large brown creature, shaped like a man, but featuring large red eyes and big wings. Mothman appeared several more times over the next year. Local residents blamed him for poor TV reception and sleepless nights as Mothman apparently liked to scream a lot. Sightings of the creature continued for about a year when Mothman used his bat-like wings to fly somewhere else.
NEWS
By ANDREW SCHOTZ | November 3, 2007
A black-and-fuzzy tradition returned to Washington County after a year of hibernation - woolly bear judging. The Hagers-Town Town and Country Almanack canceled its annual caterpillar contest last year because of low participation. Business Manager Jerry Spessard said the number of entries had dropped enormously, from around 800 to about 20. The Washington County school system hardly participates anymore, he said. The Almanack tried again this year, though, and got 76 entries.
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