Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: HeraldMail HomeCollectionsCash
IN THE NEWS

Cash

NEWS
March 24, 1998
Editorial - Seeking sewer cash About 95 percent of the homes in the Pangborn East sewer district have problems with their septic systems, according to the Washington County Health Department, so it makes sense to provide sewer service there. But at what cost? The county commissioners asked themselves that question last week, and probably will answer it by doing again what they've been doing with the rest of the county system - subsidizing it with general fund dollars. But unless the governor signs a bill sought by the commissioners to make such a subsidy legal, the county board's action only hasten the day when this subsidy will face a court challenge.
Advertisement
NEWS
January 28, 2000
Cash stolen from apartment KEEDYSVILLE, Md. - An undisclosed but large amount of cash was stolen from an apartment house at 5116 Red Hill Road Friday afternoon, according to the Washington County Sheriff's Department. The apartment house was broken into through the basement door between noon and 1:30 p.m. and the residence was ransacked, police said. Anyone with more information is asked to call the Washington County Sheriff's Department at 301-791-3020. Cars collide on Pa. 316 QUINCY TOWNSHIP, Pa. - A southbound vehicle on Pa. 316 collided with a northbound vehicle Friday morning after the driver tried to pass a plow truck, according to Pennsylvania State Police.
NEWS
August 29, 2005
The following state cash awards were announced Thursday: · $1,869,375 (Governor's Office for Children Local Management Board Award); Washington County Community Partnership for Children & Families, for various community programs. · $200,000 (Community Development Block Grant Program); Washington County Community Action Council, for low-income housing rehabilitation. · $50,000 (Community Legacy program); City of Hagerstown, for demolition of Massey property buildings along East Baltimore Street to make room for new homes.
NEWS
by JULIE E. GREENE | June 8, 2004
julieg@herald-mail.com An official with the Hagerstown Model Railroad Museum asked Sharpsburg officials for financial help Monday night because more than $31,000 is needed to finish the project. Delays and other circumstances beyond the group's control have caused the project's cost to be far more than original estimates, according to a letter the museum's vice president, Denise Troxell, presented to the mayor and Town Council at Monday night's meeting. "We're running out of cash.
NEWS
BY DAN SPEARS | April 17, 2002
dans@herald-mail.com THURMONT, Md. - The Catoctin softball team gambled and lost in the seventh inning Tuesday afternoon against Middletown. The Cougars tried again in the eighth inning and came up empty. They did it again in the ninth. Finally, the Knights made them pay up in the 10th inning. No. 5 Middletown scored twice in the top of the third extra frame, then pulled a line out-throw out double play in the bottom half for a 4-2 victory, handing the No. 3 Cougars their first defeat of the season and throwing the Monocacy Valley Athletic League race up in the air. "We've been doing well right from the start of the season," said Middletown catcher Megan Enders, whose double in the top of the 10th brought in the winning run. "But today, I think we played even better.
NEWS
By CANDICE BOSELY | October 22, 2005
martinsburg@herald-mail.com CHARLES TOWN, W.VA. Three of 19 stylists at Hair Cuttery in Charles Town had to be begged to contribute money to buy 360 Powerball tickets earlier this week, but it's likely none are complaining now - after taxes, each will take home more than $30,000 in winnings. One of the 360 tickets matched the first five numbers of Wednesday's Powerball drawing - 7, 21, 43, 44 and 49. The Powerball number on the ticket was 34, but the winning number was 29, according to a press release from the West Virginia Lottery Commission.
NEWS
By DAVE McMILLION, Charles Town | June 24, 1999
MARTINSBURG, W.Va. - Money continues to stream in for the renovation of the old B&O Roundhouse off East Martin Street. State lawmakers say another $200,000 for the renovation of the roundhouse has been included in the legislative budget digest. The digest, part of the recently approved 1999-2000 budget, is a list of special projects across the state that have received funding from the Legislature. Both Sen. John Unger, D-Berkeley, and Del. Vicki Douglas, D-Berkeley, requested digest money for the roundhouse, which is being renovated for public use. The $200,000 is in addition to a $300,000 allocation the county received last week for the purchase of the building.
NEWS
July 29, 2003
Most Democrats in the Pennsylvania State Senate favor legalizing slot machines at the state's horse tracks. But to keep things above board, they also favor keeping slot-machine company executives from making political contributions. We agree; lawmakers need to sort this one out on its merits, not on who's kicking in the largest number of dollars. House Democrats, the majority of whom favor slots, removed the Senate's prohibition on gambling company executives' political contributions because they said it would violate the state's constitution.
NEWS
by LYNN F. LITTLE | November 3, 2006
Charging holiday gifts can speed mail or Internet orders and simplify a return, but using credit might give you a false sense of your ability to pay. While shopping is very much a part of the holiday season, it truly is the thought that counts. Spending more than you can afford can compromise your ability to meet future needs. Overspending is easy. Advertising increases during the holiday season, and stores offer expanded inventories. It is, however, possible to shop, follow your spending plan and enjoy it without feeling like Scrooge.
NEWS
December 28, 2004
A Pennsylvania school board is not usually where you would find a gambler, but between now and May, members from all over the state will have to place a bet on whether a share of $1 billion in slot-machine proceeds is worth the effort. It's new money that would reduce the average homeowner's property tax bill by about $333. But, as with many good things, there are some strings attached. If districts take the gambling money, their ability to raise property taxes higher than the rate of inflation will be curbed.
The Herald-Mail Articles
|