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Career Ladder

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NEWS
May 10, 2005
Should employees who take on more work be entitled to extra pay? Most would say yes, but the "career ladder" being proposed by the Washington County Board of Education is meeting with opposition from the Washington County Teachers' Association. Given the number of questions and doubts raised by WCTA about how well this system would work, we recommend that the board consider a compromise that would make it a pilot program for several years. That would give everyone time to evaluate it before it becomes a permanent part of the pay system.
NEWS
May 8, 2005
Teachers who do extra work should get extra pay. The Washington County Teachers Association and the School Board both agree on that. What they don't agree on is how that extra work should affect a teacher's base pay. It's important because both groups agree that how this is resolved will affect teacher recruiting here. Both feel strongly that the method they prefer is the best one, which makes compromise difficult, although everyone is still talking. At the heart of the debate is a concept called a "career ladder.
NEWS
May 17, 2005
The way I see it, the only benefit to being a public school teacher is that you're kind of expected to have a publicly adversarial relationship with the administration. Really, in what other profession can you write a letter to the editor complaining about your boss? You think Mr. Mooney would have put up with it if Lucy had written in to the Danfield Bugle to allege emotional abuse? Would Miss Jane have gotten a pay raise by griping to the Beverly Hills Courier that Mr. Drysdale was cheap?
NEWS
by KAREN HANNA | May 4, 2005
karenh@herald-mail.com HAGERSTOWN - Washington County Board of Education members told a throng of teachers who turned out to protest a standstill in contract talks Tuesday night that the board is willing to go back to the negotiating table. Hundreds of teachers jammed the board meeting room at the Central Office wearing black armbands and stickers that said, "Negotiate. Don't dictate. " Washington County Teachers' Association President Claude Sasse said before the meeting that he is concerned negotiations are dead.
NEWS
by KAREN HANNA | May 20, 2005
karenh@herald-mail.com WASHINGTON COUNTY - The Washington County Teachers Association and Washington County Board of Education have reached a tentative agreement in contract talks. The contract calls for step increases and 3 percent raises next year for teachers credited with fewer than 20 years of service. Teachers credited with 20 years of service or more would receive raises of $4,000, Superintendent Elizabeth Morgan and association spokesman Steve Benson said in separate phone calls Thursday evening.
NEWS
May 17, 2005
'Ladder' plan a rung or two short To the editor: As a veteran Washington County teacher, I read with interest Bob Maginnis' column on the career ladder and negotiations between teachers and the Washington County Board of Education. While I think Maginnis presented a fair treatment of the issues, I would like to add some perspective from a teacher's point of view. (Before addressing the career ladder, I must say that the board's "inability" to comment on negotiations sometimes seems disingenuous and self-serving.
NEWS
by KAREN HANNA | May 5, 2005
karenh@herald-mail.com WASHINGTON COUNTY - The Washington County Teachers' Association and Board of Education have agreed to return to the bargaining table. One week after talks between the bargaining units broke down, representatives from both sides said Wednesday they have scheduled to meet again. "Representatives from the board are planning to meet with WCTA representatives on Tuesday," said Carol Mowen, the school system's public information officer. Board members have denied an association claim that representatives from the board asked for an impasse last week.
NEWS
by KAREN HANNA | June 15, 2005
karenh@herald-mail.com WASHINGTON COUNTY - The Washington County Teachers' Association has ratified a new contract that would give members pay increases of at least 3 percent next year. The 2005-08 contract also includes modifications to a career ladder proposal that gives employees additional pay for taking on extra leadership responsibilities. According to WCTA President Claude Sasse, the association - which includes about 1,100 members - approved the contract by a vote of about 93 percent.
NEWS
by ERIN JULIUS | September 14, 2006
HAGERSTOWN - In 1946, Hagerstown Junior College existed primarily to educate returning WWII soldiers so they could transfer to four-year universities. Sixty years later, Hagerstown Community College offers more than 100 programs of study. Students can spend two years close to home before transferring to a university or they can take enough classes at HCC to begin a career, said Michael Martin, an academic adviser for HCC students. HCC still does a lot of work with credit transfer because it is the most basic function of a community college, said Guy Altieri, HCC president.
NEWS
by KAREN HANNA | June 22, 2005
WASHINGTON COUNTY karenh@herald-mail.com The Washington County Teachers Association and Board of Education have signed a three-year deal worth an increase of almost $6.4 million. WCTA President Claude Sasse and interim director of human resources Linda Barkdoll were on hand Tuesday night to sign the agreement before the board. The contract calls for step increases and 3 percent raises next year for teachers with fewer than 20 years of service and $4,000 raises for teachers with more than 20 years of service.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
June 3, 2008
For the Class of 2008, the first job after graduation is one of the most important in anyone's work history. If the graduate does it correctly, the result will be experience and possibly a letter of recommendation for the next step up the career ladder. Here are a few tips for young job hunters: ยท If you're not confident of your writing ability, work with a professional to develop a rsum and a cover letter to send to employers. If they contain misspellings and grammatical errors, the employer might wonder what else you don't know.
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NEWS
by ERIN JULIUS | September 14, 2006
HAGERSTOWN - In 1946, Hagerstown Junior College existed primarily to educate returning WWII soldiers so they could transfer to four-year universities. Sixty years later, Hagerstown Community College offers more than 100 programs of study. Students can spend two years close to home before transferring to a university or they can take enough classes at HCC to begin a career, said Michael Martin, an academic adviser for HCC students. HCC still does a lot of work with credit transfer because it is the most basic function of a community college, said Guy Altieri, HCC president.
NEWS
by RYAN WILLARD | August 1, 2006
I am not normal. At least, I like to think I'm not. I'm weird. When it comes to my weirdness, there is no doubt that other people have influenced me. I do things with other people. I hang out with friends who make me laugh and friends I can trust. It's not like I sit hunched in a tower and ring a bell every hour, hoping that one day the hump on my back will magically go away. I've learned to accept my weirdness as a part of me. Who wants to be normal anyway? Too boring.
NEWS
by KAREN HANNA | June 22, 2005
WASHINGTON COUNTY karenh@herald-mail.com The Washington County Teachers Association and Board of Education have signed a three-year deal worth an increase of almost $6.4 million. WCTA President Claude Sasse and interim director of human resources Linda Barkdoll were on hand Tuesday night to sign the agreement before the board. The contract calls for step increases and 3 percent raises next year for teachers with fewer than 20 years of service and $4,000 raises for teachers with more than 20 years of service.
NEWS
by KAREN HANNA | June 15, 2005
karenh@herald-mail.com WASHINGTON COUNTY - The Washington County Teachers' Association has ratified a new contract that would give members pay increases of at least 3 percent next year. The 2005-08 contract also includes modifications to a career ladder proposal that gives employees additional pay for taking on extra leadership responsibilities. According to WCTA President Claude Sasse, the association - which includes about 1,100 members - approved the contract by a vote of about 93 percent.
NEWS
by KAREN HANNA | May 20, 2005
karenh@herald-mail.com WASHINGTON COUNTY - The Washington County Teachers Association and Washington County Board of Education have reached a tentative agreement in contract talks. The contract calls for step increases and 3 percent raises next year for teachers credited with fewer than 20 years of service. Teachers credited with 20 years of service or more would receive raises of $4,000, Superintendent Elizabeth Morgan and association spokesman Steve Benson said in separate phone calls Thursday evening.
NEWS
May 17, 2005
'Ladder' plan a rung or two short To the editor: As a veteran Washington County teacher, I read with interest Bob Maginnis' column on the career ladder and negotiations between teachers and the Washington County Board of Education. While I think Maginnis presented a fair treatment of the issues, I would like to add some perspective from a teacher's point of view. (Before addressing the career ladder, I must say that the board's "inability" to comment on negotiations sometimes seems disingenuous and self-serving.
NEWS
May 17, 2005
The way I see it, the only benefit to being a public school teacher is that you're kind of expected to have a publicly adversarial relationship with the administration. Really, in what other profession can you write a letter to the editor complaining about your boss? You think Mr. Mooney would have put up with it if Lucy had written in to the Danfield Bugle to allege emotional abuse? Would Miss Jane have gotten a pay raise by griping to the Beverly Hills Courier that Mr. Drysdale was cheap?
NEWS
May 13, 2005
Editor's note - Please be as brief as possible when calling Mail Call, The Daily Mail's reader call-in line. Callers should try to limit their responses to 30 seconds. Mail Call is not staffed on weekends or holidays so it is best to call Mail Call during the week. The Mail Call number is 301-791-6236. You are welcome to leave a recorded message on any subject, but some calls will be screened out. You must include your town or county of residence. Here are some of the calls we have received lately: "On April 19, my daughter's new pink purse, T-Mobile flip phone and wallet was stolen from her locker area at Western Heights.
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