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Carbon Monoxide

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NEWS
July 6, 2005
Editor's note - Please be as brief as possible when calling Mail Call, The Daily Mail's reader call-in line. Mail Call is not staffed on weekends or holidays so it is best to call Mail Call during the week. The Mail Call number is 301-791-6236. You are welcome to leave a recorded message on any subject, but some calls will be screened out. You must include your town or county of residence. Here are some of the calls we have received lately: "This is to the person in Greencastle who said it's ridiculous that you can't go anywhere in public without people smoking.
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NEWS
by Christine L. Moats | April 12, 2004
In the United States, injuries account for 36.9 million visits to hospital emergency departments annually. Injury can result from the body's exposure to various types of energy. According to Joan Fortney, manager of trauma/EMS at Washington County Hospital, the type of wound varies depending on injuring agent and the length of exposure to the energy. The effects of the injury also are dependent on the individual's location, age, sex and underlying health status. "It is important to determine the type or mechanism of the injury," Fortney said.
NEWS
by DAVE McMILLION | February 10, 2004
charlestown@herald-mail.com SHENANDOAH JUNCTION, W.Va. - Firefighters were called to Jefferson High School Monday afternoon to deal with carbon monoxide in the building, officials said. At about 4:15 p.m., people were starting to cough at the school along Flowing Springs Road, Principal Susan Wall said. Officials detected a small amount of carbon monoxide in the building, Wall said. Firefighters determined the carbon monoxide was coming from a heating unit on the roof of the school, said Ed Smith, chief of the Independent Fire Co. Carbon monoxide was being blown into a classroom after a heating coil in the unit shorted, Smith said.
NEWS
by DON AINES | February 3, 2004
chambersburg@herald-mail.com Pennsylvania State Police say an Antrim Township teenager found dead in a car at a truck stop Sunday died of accidental carbon monoxide poisoning. Aaron C. Christman, 17, of 8586 Talhelm Road, was found at about 4:30 p.m. in a vehicle at the Travel Centers of America at 10835 John Wayne Drive, according to police. Franklin County Coroner Jeffrey R. Conner said Christman's body was found by employees of the truck stop. Conner ruled the death was accidental and said no autopsy would be performed.
NEWS
September 30, 2003
Boy being treated at Md. burn center WOODSBORO, Md. - A 14-year-old Frederick County, Md., boy was listed in stable condition Monday at Johns Hopkins Bayview Burn Center in Baltimore, a new release from the Maryland State Fire Marshal's Office said. The release said the 14-year-old, whose name was not released, suffered burns while pouring gasoline onto a pile of trash/brush in his backyard at 11321 Coppermine Road in Woodsboro at 7:02 p.m. Saturday. The gasoline flashed back onto the boy, inflicting first and second-degree burns to his face, legs, arms and neck, according to the release.
NEWS
by TAMELA BAKER | June 25, 2003
tammyb@herald-mail.com Last September, Dave and Dana Rice moved their three small boys into their dream home, a two-story classic brick with five bedrooms, a three-bay garage and lots of room for the boys to play. They were so happy with their new surroundings, they said, that they recommended Tilghmanton Estates to three other families who made plans to purchase homes in the subdivision. But since March, life in their new home has turned into a nightmare, they said.
NEWS
by ANDREW SCHOTZ | February 21, 2003
andrews@herald-mail.com WAYNESBORO, Pa. - Three people in Franklin County died after shoveling snow during the recent storm, a Waynesboro (Pa.) Hospital official said. All three were men, said Cathy Kimmel, a clinical coordinator at the hospital. One died Monday, one died Tuesday and one died Wednesday. No information was available about the identity of the men, other than that they lived in southern Franklin County, Kimmel said. All suffered cardiac arrest while shoveling, she said.
NEWS
October 10, 2000
Seven exposed to carbon monoxide By KIMBERLY YAKOWSKI / Staff Writer Seven people living in a Hagerstown duplex were hospitalized Tuesday afternoon after being exposed to high levels of carbon monoxide, according to Hagerstown Fire Department. Battalion Chief Ron Horn said the fire department received a call from Lori McClanahan, who lives at 43 Elizabeth St. with her four-year-old daughter, complaining that her carbon monoxide detector had activated. Horn said McClanahan told him she had turned on her gas furnace three days ago and had felt sick ever since.
NEWS
By JULIE E. GREENE | January 18, 2000
BUNKER HILL, W.Va. - In the wake of a Berkeley County man's death from carbon monoxide poisoning, county fire and rescue officials are urging caution and common sense. cont. from news page People need to read the instructions before operating heaters or electrical generators, ensuring there is enough ventilation and the machines are operated properly, fire officials said. Robert Ennis, 28, was found dead before 9 a.m. Monday in a home under construction in the Wide Horizon Farms subdivision off Quarry Road, according to West Virginia State Police and a county coroner.
NEWS
By DON AINES | June 9, 1999
CHAMBERSBURG, Pa. - An emergency occurred in an unexpected location Wednesday when battery acid fumes filled the Franklin County Emergency Communications Center. A malfunctioning battery charger for the system's backup power supply caused fumes, according to Franklin County Emergency Services Director Jerry Flasher. Despite the acrid odor of sulfuric acid in the communications center, Flasher said county residents with emergencies could still call 911 Wednesday night. In the basement of the courthouse, 911 Coordinator Bryan Stevenson and dispatchers Denny Clopper and Jack Poe were taking calls shortly before 9 p.m. Flasher said two dispatchers were being rotated every 10 minutes and carbon monoxide levels were being monitored every four minutes.
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