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Carbon Monoxide Poisoning

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NEWS
Lynn Little | January 6, 2012
You can't see or smell carbon monoxide, but at high levels it can kill a person in minutes. Carbon monoxide (CO) is the most common cause of poisoning death in the United States, often caused by fuel burning appliances that are not functioning properly.   Approximately 500 deaths and 15,000 visits to the emergency room occur annually due to unintentional CO poisoning. Adults aged 65 and older are especially vulnerable to unintentional CO poisoning because of their high frequency of pre-existing medical conditions.
NEWS
August 16, 2008
WAYNESBORO, Pa. -- Two men were found dead of carbon monoxide poisoning Friday afternoon in a Waynesboro house, according to a press release from Franklin County Coroner Jeffrey R. Conner. Stewart A. Dewease Jr., 49, and Keith Rohrer, 22, were found by a relative of Dewease's at 614 Park St. in Waynesboro, Conner said. The carbon monoxide poisoning was caused by a car left running in the garage, Conner said. Stewart was found on the first floor, and Rohrer was found in the basement, Conner said.
NEWS
April 8, 1998
CHAMBERSBURG, Pa. - Six people were taken to Chambersburg Hospital Wednesday night after suffering from carbon monoxide poisoning caused by an apparent furnace malfunction, according to the Chambersburg Fire Department. All the victims were still waiting to be treated late Wednesday night, according to Chambersburg Fire Department Lt. Clyde Thomas. He said he did not have the names of the victims, but all were alive. "The owner had called 911 for a seizure patient," Rice said of the incident at 136 S. Second St. The call came in at about 9:30 p.m. and when ambulance personnel arrived, they discovered the patient and others in the two-story brick house were suffering symptoms of carbon monoxide poisoning.
NEWS
by TIFFANY ARNOLD | June 30, 2006
WASHINGTON COUNTY As the floodwaters recede, a new set of worries has emerged amid cleanup efforts throughout Washington County this week. Health officials now are warning people about contaminated surface water and other health risks that have arisen in the aftermath of this week's flooding rains. In addition to contaminated water, health officials said people should be concerned about mold, mosquitoes and carbon monoxide poisoning. "It's quite possible that contaminated (surface)
NEWS
by DON AINES | February 27, 2007
CHAMBERSBURG, PA. - Two of the five victims of a carbon monoxide poisoning incident in Chambersburg on Feb. 15 asked the Chambersburg Borough Council to consider making detectors for the potentially deadly gas mandatory in some rental properties. "I was one of the CO (carbon monoxide) victims ... I believe CO detectors should be required in apartments" that have furnaces, Nancy Redcay of 120 S. Third St. told the council. The council did not call for making the detectors mandatory, but asked solicitor Thomas Finucane to come up with some type of incentive for landlords to install the devices.
OPINION
January 27, 2012
Thumbs up to everyone involved in rescuing a man who became stuck 200 feet deep in a cave off Cresspond Road near Clear Spring for four hours. Advanced technical rescue units from Washington, Frederick and Montgomery counties worked their way back to rescue him unharmed. We are grateful for our first responders who train, sacrifice and run toward danger to keep us safe. Thumbs up to Christian Lopez, 16, of Martinsburg, W.Va., who earned “the golden ticket” for a chance to compete in the “American Idol” Hollywood semifinals.
BREAKINGNEWS
December 25, 2011
A 48-year-old man died early Christmas morning in a house fire on Path Valley Road in Franklin County, Pa., Pennsylvania State Police and the Franklin County Coroner said. Brian James Glass of 1689 Path Valley Road was pronounced dead on the scene by Franklin County Coroner Jeff Conner, police said. The fire was reported at 3:30 a.m. at 1689 Path Valley Road, Conner said in a news release. An elderly man and woman were able to escape the home during the fire, police said.
NEWS
February 10, 2004
Md. men charged with making device BRUNSWICK, Md. - Two men were arrested Monday in connection with a discovery of a destructive device at a Brunswick home last week. A State Fire Marshal's Office news release said authorities found a device - a pint bottle containing gasoline and a paper wick - inside a residence in the unit block of North Maryland street. John S. Wade, 23, of that residence, and Ronald W. Lavely, 23, of the 100 block of Central Avenue, each were charged by the Brunswick Police Department with manufacturing a destructive device and reckless endangerment, according to the release.
NEWS
By TIFFANY ARNOLD | April 29, 2006
The deaths of Roxbury Correctional Institutional Officer Jeffery Alan Wroten and the 12 men who worked the Sago coal mine framed the mood of union officials and lawmakers at the Workers Memorial Day program Friday. "I know that when you kiss your wife and family good-bye, you want to be able to kiss your wife and family hello," said Seaven Gordon, of the United Steel Workers #20388. Workers Memorial Day was founded in April 28, 1989 as a day of remembrance for all those who have died on the job, said Teresa Martin, the union's recording secretary.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
October 9, 2012
Three people were treated for carbon monoxide poisoning Monday night at Chambersburg Hospital, according to Chambersburg Emergency Services Chief William FitzGerald. Crews responded to 321 Philadelphia Ave. for a furnace malfunction and evaluated nine people, FitzGerald said. Some of the residents reported episodes of dizziness, and one might have passed out for a period of time, FitzGerald said. Children were among the residents of the three-unit apartment building, he said. “That was the first time (for the season)
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OPINION
January 27, 2012
Thumbs up to everyone involved in rescuing a man who became stuck 200 feet deep in a cave off Cresspond Road near Clear Spring for four hours. Advanced technical rescue units from Washington, Frederick and Montgomery counties worked their way back to rescue him unharmed. We are grateful for our first responders who train, sacrifice and run toward danger to keep us safe. Thumbs up to Christian Lopez, 16, of Martinsburg, W.Va., who earned “the golden ticket” for a chance to compete in the “American Idol” Hollywood semifinals.
NEWS
Lynn Little | January 6, 2012
You can't see or smell carbon monoxide, but at high levels it can kill a person in minutes. Carbon monoxide (CO) is the most common cause of poisoning death in the United States, often caused by fuel burning appliances that are not functioning properly.   Approximately 500 deaths and 15,000 visits to the emergency room occur annually due to unintentional CO poisoning. Adults aged 65 and older are especially vulnerable to unintentional CO poisoning because of their high frequency of pre-existing medical conditions.
BREAKINGNEWS
December 25, 2011
A 48-year-old man died early Christmas morning in a house fire on Path Valley Road in Franklin County, Pa., Pennsylvania State Police and the Franklin County Coroner said. Brian James Glass of 1689 Path Valley Road was pronounced dead on the scene by Franklin County Coroner Jeff Conner, police said. The fire was reported at 3:30 a.m. at 1689 Path Valley Road, Conner said in a news release. An elderly man and woman were able to escape the home during the fire, police said.
NEWS
July 2, 2010
You want to take good care of your family. You try to eat healthful foods. You take your children to the doctor for regular checkups. You try your best to protect your family from accidents and illness. You want to live in a safe neighborhood and home. Did you know your home might have hidden dangers to your children's health? Ask yourself the following questions. The answers to these questions will help you learn if your home is safe and healthy. Each question contains a link to detailed questions you can ask as well as action steps you can use to help improve the health and safety of your home.
NEWS
November 27, 2008
"Reading carefully through the story on the injuries and fatalities on the first day of hunting season in West Virginia, I was pleased to see that there was only one gunshot wound, when a 13-year-old accidentally shot himself in the arm. There were very few accidents overall, and most of those came from carbon monoxide poisoning from heaters. The lack of gunshot wounds means that hunters are well-trained, cautious, and safety-conscious. Way to go, guys and gals. " - Chambersburg, Pa. "The weeping has begun by the conservatives.
NEWS
August 16, 2008
WAYNESBORO, Pa. -- Two men were found dead of carbon monoxide poisoning Friday afternoon in a Waynesboro house, according to a press release from Franklin County Coroner Jeffrey R. Conner. Stewart A. Dewease Jr., 49, and Keith Rohrer, 22, were found by a relative of Dewease's at 614 Park St. in Waynesboro, Conner said. The carbon monoxide poisoning was caused by a car left running in the garage, Conner said. Stewart was found on the first floor, and Rohrer was found in the basement, Conner said.
NEWS
by DON AINES | February 27, 2007
CHAMBERSBURG, PA. - Two of the five victims of a carbon monoxide poisoning incident in Chambersburg on Feb. 15 asked the Chambersburg Borough Council to consider making detectors for the potentially deadly gas mandatory in some rental properties. "I was one of the CO (carbon monoxide) victims ... I believe CO detectors should be required in apartments" that have furnaces, Nancy Redcay of 120 S. Third St. told the council. The council did not call for making the detectors mandatory, but asked solicitor Thomas Finucane to come up with some type of incentive for landlords to install the devices.
NEWS
by TIFFANY ARNOLD | June 30, 2006
WASHINGTON COUNTY As the floodwaters recede, a new set of worries has emerged amid cleanup efforts throughout Washington County this week. Health officials now are warning people about contaminated surface water and other health risks that have arisen in the aftermath of this week's flooding rains. In addition to contaminated water, health officials said people should be concerned about mold, mosquitoes and carbon monoxide poisoning. "It's quite possible that contaminated (surface)
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