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Carbon Dioxide

NEWS
By JAMES WARNER | December 22, 2007
Following Al Gore's Academy Award and Nobel Prize, the popular culture is consumed with concern over global warming and any contribution to the same by human emissions of carbon dioxide. How realistic are these fears? The answer is "not very. " Solar activity is the primary factor in creating the cycles of warming and cooling. During the "Little Ice Age," 1250-1850 A.D., there was a period from 1645-1715 during which there were no recorded observations of sunspot activity. We know that solar activity is cyclical.
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NEWS
By JAMES H. WARNER | May 4, 2008
It is a human failing to be susceptible to poor judgment. It is a sign of maturity to recognize when our judgment has been bad and to correct it when the evidence presents itself. Congress apparently lacks this maturity. Congress mandated the addition of ethanol to gasoline and provided large subsidies to encourage this. This was supposed to reduce carbon emissions and reduce dependence on foreign oil. It has not only failed in its primary objectives, but is contributing to the threat of massive starvation around the world.
NEWS
By MEG H. PARTINGTON | April 20, 2000
CHAMBERSBURG, Pa. - As Rachel Riley licks ketchup off a french fry and bounces in and out of a booster seat, it's hard to imagine she spent the first couple of months of her life in an incubator. cont. from lifestyle The brown-eyed toddler was born 28 weeks into her mother's pregnancy after an emergency caesarean section at Hershey Medical Center in Hershey, Pa. Daphne Riley, a nurse at Keystone Health Center in Chambersburg, Pa., said she was doing everything by the book.
NEWS
By DON AINES | January 30, 2008
CHAMBERSBURG, Pa. - The canaries in the coal mine of global warming are the polar ice caps, rapidly melting and threatening to displace tens of millions of people as sea levels rise and inundate the coastal regions of Earth, Lance Simmens told his audience Tuesday at Wilson College. Former Vice President Al Gore's message from the Oscar-winning documentary "An Inconvenient Truth" about reducing fossil fuel use to save the planet was delivered by Simmens, a special assistant to Pennsylvania Gov. Ed Rendell.
NEWS
April 29, 2003
Let's prevent future droughts To the editor: Your April 26 article, "Officials say Tri-State's drought over" brought welcome news. What it didn't mention is that we have the opportunity to prevent drought in our area from becoming more frequent and severe in the future. In order to prevent drought from becoming more common, we need to takes steps now to halt global warming. The blanket of excess carbon dioxide that currently envelops the earth, creating climate changes like drought, can be thinned to normal levels.
NEWS
by LAURA BELL | April 17, 2007
What will Hagerstown be like in 30 years? Will you still live here? What about the climate? How warm will it be? Some like it hot. Do you? More and more scientists and political leaders around the world agree that global warming is a growing concern. The Pew Center on Global Climate Change, at www.pewclimate.org, reports a rise in Earth's overall surface temperature of 1.4 degrees. The warmest year on record is 2005, and the warmest decade since the Civil War was the 1990s.
NEWS
May 17, 2007
"It amazes me how the people in Washington County can get upset over $15,000 to implant more immigrants into Washington County. " Plastic surgery has really made some advances lately. "Did you say that, or is that something you said?" Neither one. "I think Queen Elizabeth ought to go home. We hardly have enough money to feed ourself without feeding her. Who does she think she is? When she's done eating, everybody's done eating. " Yeah, who died and made her the Queen of England?
NEWS
By JENNIFER FITCH | March 22, 2009
FAYETTEVILLE, Pa. -- There's power in manure. Chris Brechbill estimates his 600 cows' manure could make more than 100 kilowatts of energy an hour if the methane is harvested from it. And removing the methane would also remove the odor, something that would be most noticeable when waste is spread on Brechbill's 450 acres of fields. "It's going to save me, they're projecting, $61,000 a year in energy savings," Brechbill said, noting he'd also have excess energy to sell.
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