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Carbon Dioxide

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NEWS
March 11, 2007
The Environmental Protection Agency offers the following tips, which, if practiced at home or on the road, can reduce the effect a person or a household has on the environment: At home · Change light bulbs: Change regular light bulbs to compact fluorescent light bulbs. A compact fluorescent light bulb saves 150 pounds of carbon dioxide each year. · Clean and service appliances, computers and tools regularly: Before replacing them, check to see if they are repairable.
NEWS
July 9, 2009
Carbon dioxide also has negative impact To the editor: James Martin's letter, published July 5 ("Low-cost energy makes U.S. power possible), is an excellent example of how to distort the facts by omission. True, the total carbon on the Earth is about the same today as in the past. And true, ancient atmospheric carbon was higher at times than today. But what Martin doesn't discuss is the effect increased atmospheric carbon (carbon dioxide) had on the planet.
NEWS
April 19, 2002
MARTINSBURG, W.Va. - A former Hedgesville, W.Va., man implicated two years ago in an elaborate marijuana-growing operation in Jefferson County pleaded guilty Wednesday to manufacturing 149 of the illegal plants. Jason Barrett Drake, 39, now of Pottstown, Pa., could face up to 20 years in prison and a fine of $1 million, said U.S. Attorney Thomas E. Johnston, who said Drake will remain in custody pending sentencing. When police raided the house on Job Corps Road on May 17, 2000, they found a large amount of cured pot in four 33-gallon garbage bags in addition to the growing plants.
NEWS
April 9, 2007
Here are tips consumers can use to help reduce global warming: Select a fuel-efficient car. Purchasing a car is considered the most important climate decision consumers can make. Each gallon of gasoline consumed releases 25 pounds of heat-trapping carbon dioxide (CO2) into the atmosphere. Better gas mileage not only reduces global warming, but will save thousands of dollars in gasoline costs over the life of the vehicle. Also consider new technologies such as hybrid engines.
NEWS
by ANNA BALDASARRE/Pulse Correspondent | July 17, 2007
Recently, hype about global warming has run rampant. But what is the truth? Are the reported increases in surface temperatures merely part of the Earth's natural cycle of warming and cooling? Or are humans causing the widespread transformation of our world? To find out, I spoke with Matthys Levy, author of "Why the Wind Blows: A History of Weather and Global Warming. " Global warming is "a real problem, and something is going to need to be done" about it, Levy said. Records show that the average temperature of Earth is rising.
NEWS
By CALEB CALHOUN | caleb.calhoun@herald-mail.com | June 1, 2012
In the face of a new report that carbon dioxide levels in the Earth's atmosphere may be their highest in at least 800,000 years, Hagerstown resident Mark Sands said Friday it's time to take climate change seriously. “It's something to be concerned about, and it's good that was reported,” said Sands, 50, referring to an Associated Press story published in The Herald-Mail on Thursday. “Something has to start being done, and some of the things to make clean air need to be more universal,” he said.
NEWS
By KAUSTUV BASU | kaustuv.basu@herald-mail.com | July 16, 2013
Deadly gases, a lack of oxygen and temperatures well above 100 degrees are some of the factors that could make silo entrapments such as the one that occurred Tuesday on Lehmans Mill Road extremely hazardous, according to experts. Jeff Semler, an Extension educator specializing in agriculture and natural resources for the University of Maryland Extension in Washington County, said one of the chief hazards in silo accidents is the risk of gas - in particular, carbon dioxide. “You can get unconscious very fast due to the lack of oxygen,” Semler said.
NEWS
By DAVE McMILLION, Charles Town | May 23, 2000
CHARLES TOWN, W.Va. - A man living in a house on Job Corps Road where police allege they found an elaborate marijuana growing operation last week was charged with two drug offenses Tuesday, according to court records. Police said the man was not there when they raided the house last Wednesday. Officers left a note telling him to call police, Jefferson County Sheriff William Senseney said. Detectives and undercover officers raiding the home alleged they found 149 marijuana plants and a large amount of cured pot in four 33-gallon garbage bags.
NEWS
by ROBERT GARY | March 11, 2007
Global warming can be solved by taxing carbon dioxide sources according to the amount they release into the atmosphere and using the money raised to subsidize zero carbon dioxide alternatives. The model for this policy is the Social Security system, which is one of the only federal programs that actually works, at least so far. The reason it works is because it is astonishingly simple. Working people pay their FICA taxes, and the money goes into a trust fund. From that fund, Social Security checks are written for retirees.
NEWS
By LISA TEDRICK PREJEAN | April 11, 2008
Twice within the last week I have come upon the term "carbon footprint. " From the context of each passage, I was able to determine that this has something to do with the environment. Previously, I had never heard those two words together. I started feeling out of the loop, similar to the feeling I get around 20-somethings who have all the latest technological gadgets and a lingo to go with them. It's hard to keep up. I must be getting old, and I'm hanging on to my dial-up Internet service to prove it. Actually, I had the feeling that this term is something I should know, so I took the safe route.
ARTICLES BY DATE
OPINION
August 24, 2013
New food law would hurt local farmers To the editor: Each week at our farm stands, we try to explain a peculiar situation to our customers. They come to buy our fresh fruit and vegetables, and I tell them that in a few years this produce will be illegal to sell. Why? Because it has some dirt and bacteria on it. The strawberries, for instance, have some trace amount of straw and soil on them. As do the tomatoes, beans and cucumbers. We do rinse them before leaving the farm, but we won't put them through a disinfectant bath or pack them in antiseptic plastic containers.
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NEWS
By KAUSTUV BASU | kaustuv.basu@herald-mail.com | July 16, 2013
Deadly gases, a lack of oxygen and temperatures well above 100 degrees are some of the factors that could make silo entrapments such as the one that occurred Tuesday on Lehmans Mill Road extremely hazardous, according to experts. Jeff Semler, an Extension educator specializing in agriculture and natural resources for the University of Maryland Extension in Washington County, said one of the chief hazards in silo accidents is the risk of gas - in particular, carbon dioxide. “You can get unconscious very fast due to the lack of oxygen,” Semler said.
NEWS
By CALEB CALHOUN | caleb.calhoun@herald-mail.com | June 1, 2012
In the face of a new report that carbon dioxide levels in the Earth's atmosphere may be their highest in at least 800,000 years, Hagerstown resident Mark Sands said Friday it's time to take climate change seriously. “It's something to be concerned about, and it's good that was reported,” said Sands, 50, referring to an Associated Press story published in The Herald-Mail on Thursday. “Something has to start being done, and some of the things to make clean air need to be more universal,” he said.
LIFESTYLE
Celeste Maiorana | May 10, 2011
This has certainly been a wild spring. Cold, then hot. Dry, then wet. Violent storms. It prompts one to wonder: Does planet Earth have a fever? Is this weather really more extreme than it used to be? Is this our future or just an anomaly that will disappear soon? What role, if any, do humans play in it? I'll leave weather and climate forecasting to the experts. But, with seven billion people distributed throughout all the habitable areas of the Earth, I think it is safe to say that our actions are affecting the health of our planet.
NEWS
By RACHAEL JOHNSON / Pulse Correspondent | March 31, 2009
It's an adrenaline rush as I dash across the field, a cool carbon dioxide tank pressed against my chest. As I dodge objects moving at 300 hundred feet per second, I'm having fun playing paintball. Paintball is the fastest growing recreational sport, according to an ESPN report, with many versions of play. The sport was started in 1981. Today, tournaments such as the Tampa Open and World Cup attract as many as 200 teams. It has become so popular that major cities have formed teams to compete at these competitions.
NEWS
By JENNIFER FITCH | March 22, 2009
FAYETTEVILLE, Pa. -- There's power in manure. Chris Brechbill estimates his 600 cows' manure could make more than 100 kilowatts of energy an hour if the methane is harvested from it. And removing the methane would also remove the odor, something that would be most noticeable when waste is spread on Brechbill's 450 acres of fields. "It's going to save me, they're projecting, $61,000 a year in energy savings," Brechbill said, noting he'd also have excess energy to sell.
NEWS
By KRISTY SMITH / 301-432-8615 | October 14, 2008
Dogs escape from fenced area Greetings, neighbors. I hope all is well. We have a little crisis at our house. While we were away last week, our dogs escaped from the fenced yard of their babysitter on Ford Avenue. Jemma is a white Jack Russell terrier with a pink collar. She is full of personality. Jolie is a brindle coat mixed-breed terrier with a blue collar. Jolie is skittish and timid of men. If you have seen them, or know anything about their travels, call me at 240-285-8894 or 301-432-8615.
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