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NEWS
By DAVE McMILLION | davem@herald-mail.com | April 11, 2012
Winter left a few late memories Wednesday when an icy substance known as “graupel” fell across portions of Western Maryland, according to the National Weather Service. Graupel is formed when snow starts to evaporate when it is falling, but then picks up moisture as it nears the ground, said Stephen Konarik, a meteorologist with the National Weather Service in Sterling, Va. When graupel hits the ground, it looks like a pellet. But unlike sleet, which is clear, graupel is white, Konarik said.
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NEWS
by SCOTT BUTKI | June 4, 2004
scottb@herald-mail.com Two area hospitals have received grants from the Department of Homeland Security for decontamination chambers that could be used in the event of a chemical or biological weapons attack. Washington County Hospital received a grant of $103,540 to pay for three decontamination tents and equipment, spokeswoman Kelly Redmond said. City Hospital in Martinsburg, W.Va., received one decontamination tent valued at about $30,000, spokeswoman Teresa McCabe said.
NEWS
By JOSHUA BOWMAN | February 4, 2008
WASHINGTON COUNTY -- Air Force One landed Friday at Hagerstown Regional Airport, marking the first time a Boeing 747 has touched down at the airport since the runway extension was built, airport officials said. President Bush was on his way to Camp David when his plane landed at the airport just before 5 p.m. because of the threat of inclement weather, said Greg Larsen, the airport's business development manager. Bush, who was at the airport for less than 10 minutes, was transferred to a motorcade for the rest of the trip, Larsen said.
NEWS
July 19, 2000
Can we afford a baseball accord? A couple of weeks ago a nice reporter from CBS "Sportsline" called up to ask how Hagerstown's plans for a new minor league baseball stadium were progressing. He said he'd researched the story about a year ago, and wanted to see what had changed since then. After I stopped laughing I said "Not much. In fact, you could have researched this story five years ago and it would still be just as salient today as it would have been in 1995.
NEWS
by ANDREA ROWLAND | November 7, 2004
andrear@herald-mail.com THURMONT, Md. - The area that is now Catoctin Mountain Park in the northwest corner of Frederick County, Md., boasts an industrious, illustrious - and sometimes contentious - history. It was a hunting ground for American Indians and the homeplace of early settlers to Western Maryland; the site of bountiful resources for tanneries, sawmills, an iron furnace and other industries; a farming community in its high valleys; an early hot spot for tourists; a retreat for presidents; a training ground for spies; and a mecca for making moonshine.
NEWS
by TAMELA BAKER | October 12, 2003
tammyb@herald-mail.com The first thing to strike a visitor arriving at Trout Run is the soothing rush of the waters of Little Hunting Creek as they cascade over the rocks. It is striking because it's the only audible sound, even though busy U.S. 15 is only a mile away. The almost instant transformation from freeway interchange to primeval forest nearly takes one's breath away. The seclusion of the retreat has made Trout Run a favorite hideaway for a number of well-heeled visitors, including several U.S. presidents.
NEWS
by PEPPER BALLARD | June 7, 2006
HALFWAY After 120 years in business, Danzer Industries Inc., a small cargo trailer manufacturing plant in Halfway, has been forced to shut down and lay off about 70 employees because it can't keep up with the competition, an official with its parent company said Tuesday. "It had financial difficulties. The market in the trailer business is soft," said Marcus Kennedy, manager of manufacturing services for Obsidian Enterprises Inc., Danzer's parent company in Indianapolis. "We stayed on as long as we could," he said.
NEWS
By DAN DEARTH | November 10, 2008
WOLFSVILLE, Md. -- Mark Lewis vowed he would never surrender when he saw dozens of American soldiers lying dead in the snow during the Battle of the Bulge. Lewis said he witnessed that grim sight when his unit, the 17th Airborne Division, was rushing to the front to help stall the German advance. As the men approached their positions, Lewis said, they passed the frozen bodies of nearly 100 American soldiers who had been shot after they surrendered to the German army. The incident became infamously known as the Malmedy Massacre.
NEWS
June 2, 2006
Early last month, Rohrersville resident Daniel Moeller submitted a Freedom of Information request for Washington County's emergency evacuation plan. It was denied, in a letter that didn't explain that Moeller could have obtained a portion of the plan that doesn't reveal things such as "specific security procedures .. " Given what was known about the plan, Moeller's request seemed like a reasonable one. In December, John Latimer IV, director of the county Division of Fire and Emergency Services, said the plan would be submitted to the state in January.
NEWS
by KAREN HANNA | April 3, 2006
HAGERSTOWN Whether fire or flood, or the dark of night, that comes with a power outage, one student in a citizens' emergency response class said Sunday she feels better prepared. "Most of the times when you talk about getting involved in the community, you're talking about building a park here or providing some sort of service, but this is protecting the community if it hits the fan," Cindy Garland said during the third day of a Community Emergency Response Training class.
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