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NEWS
May 12, 2000
Tips for athletes Speakers at the Women in Sports Symposium offer these tips to keep female athletes in tip-top shape now and as they age: Regular exercise should include not only aerobic exercise but also strength training, which will help prevent injury. Beware of overexercising, a notorious problem among people with eating disorders. Females run an increased risk of knee injury. Strength training can help prevent injury by supporting the joints, which are less likely to move with muscle holding them in place.
NEWS
by LYNN F. LITTLE | October 13, 2004
We are a caffeinated nation. According to industry figures, more than half the adults in the United States drink coffee every day, averaging more than three 9-ounce mugs per day. U.S. oft drink consumption also is high - some 18 ounces per person per day. Add to this tea, chocolate and over-the-counter drugs containing caffeine, and it's no wonder we sometimes worry about the amount of caffeine we're ingesting. Caffeine is an alkaloid compound that stimulates cardiac muscle and the central nervous system and is rapidly absorbed and distributed throughout the body.
NEWS
by LYNN F. LITTLE | March 12, 2003
For many, the dawning of each new year commonly brings grandiose resolutions that too often are fleeting. March is Nutrition Month, a good time to re-evaluate and put into place some of those health and nutrition resolutions. It's never too late to get started on improving your health and well-being. To help you with those resolutions, here are several suggestions that can easily be incorporated into your dietary plan and that are sure to get you started on the road to good health.
NEWS
June 17, 1997
- by Lynn F. Little Milk is a basic food that everyone in the family needs every day. Milk is called nature's perfect food, yet, despite the great taste and the fact that it's a good source of many vitamins and minerals, Americans are drinking less milk. Many believe that milk is high in fat and calories. Skim and 1 percent milk have little or no fat with all the calcium and other nutrients found in whole milk, and fewer calories. Milk is important for people of all ages - not just kids.
NEWS
June 4, 1999
More Health Notes page 1 Stress workshop to be offered Friday The workshop "How to Have Less Stress and More Satisfaction on the Job" will be offered Friday, June 11, from 9 a.m. to noon at Robinwood Medical Center Community Room, 11110 Medical Campus Road in Hagerstown. Chris Nunn and Kim Hutton will be presenters for this National Association of Social Work - Maryland workshop. It will examine the how-to's of shifting to less stressful work paradigms and ways that the therapist, supervisor or direct-care provider can accomplish this.
NEWS
By Lynn F. Little | July 28, 1999
Soy has come a long way since its days as an inexpensive meat extender. From soy milk and ice cream bars to tofu and tempeh, the variety of interesting and tasty soy products is almost endless. [cont. from lifestyle ] Tofu is one of the more adaptable soy products. It is made by filtering cooked, pureed soybeans. The resulting "milk" is curdled, much like cheese, using coagulating agents. Some varieties offer added calcium if they are made with a calcium-based coagulant.
NEWS
by LYNN F. LITTLE | January 21, 2004
In addition to lightening up your calorie intake, including more greens in meals will add an extra helping of vitamins, minerals and phytochemicals that promote health and may help reduce the risk of cancer. Greens are good sources of vitamins C, A and E, which are antioxidants known to fight cancer. Greens typically are high in beta carotene. Depending on the type, they also can be a good source of calcium, iron, potassium and lutein. Greens are low in calories, with 18 to 40 calories per serving, and are a good source of dietary fiber.
NEWS
May 28, 1997
By KATE COLEMAN Staff Writer Does your preschooler turn up her nose if you put something new on her dinner plate? Are you frustrated because your 3-year-old son wants peanut butter and nothing but peanut butter every single day? Are your kids finicky eaters? Relax, you're not alone. Kids outgrow the picky eater syndrome, and parents survive it, says Penelope N. Dalton, a registered dietitian and nutrition educator for Dairy Council of Greater Metropolitan Washington Inc. There are ways to cope while your kids are in the middle of this stage of development.
NEWS
December 27, 2001
Do you need a nutritional supplement? By Lynn Little An estimated half of Americans now take some kind of nutritional supplement. The term "nutritional supplement" encompasses a wide range of products with multivitamin/mineral supplements the most commonly used. People cite a variety of reasons for taking supplements, ranging from those that are medically necessary to "popping a couple of pills" as an easier alternative to practicing healthy eating habits. While supplements are beneficial under some circumstances, they are not recommended simply as an alternative to a nutritious diet.
NEWS
By TIFFANY ARNOLD | April 22, 2009
For too long, cooked greens were something you ate after an ultimatum, and disliking them earned you the title of "picky eater. " Chances are, the reason you never liked cooked greens in the first place had nothing to do with a phobia of all things veggie -- childhood onset, no doubt. More likely, somebody overcooked the greens. Let the quick-cook method come to the rescue, said Lynn Little, family and consumer sciences educator with University Maryland Cooperative Extension in Washington County.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
Lynn Little | April 24, 2012
Osteoporosis is a disease that causes bones to become weak or even brittle.  Anyone can develop osteoporosis; however, women are five times more likely -  especially those who go through menopause before the age of 45 - to develop osteoporosis than men. There is no way to stop or cure osteoporosis, but there are things we can do to slow it down.  Lowering the chances of developing osteoporosis can be done first by getting enough calcium....
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NEWS
By LYNN LITTLE / Special to The Herald-Mail | June 9, 2010
A person never outgrows their need for calcium. In the early years, calcium helps build strong bones and teeth. However, adults need calcium, too. Bone is living tissue that is constantly being rebuilt with the aid of calcium. Calcium plays a key role in: o Preventing osteoporosis. One out of two women and one out of eight men will develop this bone-thinning disease. A diet high in calcium can help preserve bone mass and slow bone loss. o Preventing hypertension. Millions of Americans have high blood pressure (hypertension)
NEWS
By LYNN LITTLE | October 14, 2009
Calcium is the most abundant mineral in the body. Ninety-nine percent of this calcium is in teeth and bones. The other 1 percent is found in blood, extracellular fluids and within cells of all tissues where it regulates key metabolic functions. Calcium is needed for growth and bone density, plus it keeps the heart pumping, muscles moving and nerves communicating. Low calcium intake over your lifetime may lead to less dense bones or bone loss and increased risk of osteoporosis. The body stores calcium in bones till age 20, reaching peak bone mass by the age of 30. Milk products are usually the primary source of calcium in our diets.
NEWS
By TIFFANY ARNOLD | April 22, 2009
For too long, cooked greens were something you ate after an ultimatum, and disliking them earned you the title of "picky eater. " Chances are, the reason you never liked cooked greens in the first place had nothing to do with a phobia of all things veggie -- childhood onset, no doubt. More likely, somebody overcooked the greens. Let the quick-cook method come to the rescue, said Lynn Little, family and consumer sciences educator with University Maryland Cooperative Extension in Washington County.
NEWS
by LYNN F. LITTLE | October 13, 2004
We are a caffeinated nation. According to industry figures, more than half the adults in the United States drink coffee every day, averaging more than three 9-ounce mugs per day. U.S. oft drink consumption also is high - some 18 ounces per person per day. Add to this tea, chocolate and over-the-counter drugs containing caffeine, and it's no wonder we sometimes worry about the amount of caffeine we're ingesting. Caffeine is an alkaloid compound that stimulates cardiac muscle and the central nervous system and is rapidly absorbed and distributed throughout the body.
NEWS
by LYNN F. LITTLE | January 21, 2004
In addition to lightening up your calorie intake, including more greens in meals will add an extra helping of vitamins, minerals and phytochemicals that promote health and may help reduce the risk of cancer. Greens are good sources of vitamins C, A and E, which are antioxidants known to fight cancer. Greens typically are high in beta carotene. Depending on the type, they also can be a good source of calcium, iron, potassium and lutein. Greens are low in calories, with 18 to 40 calories per serving, and are a good source of dietary fiber.
NEWS
by LYNN F. LITTLE | March 12, 2003
For many, the dawning of each new year commonly brings grandiose resolutions that too often are fleeting. March is Nutrition Month, a good time to re-evaluate and put into place some of those health and nutrition resolutions. It's never too late to get started on improving your health and well-being. To help you with those resolutions, here are several suggestions that can easily be incorporated into your dietary plan and that are sure to get you started on the road to good health.
NEWS
December 27, 2001
Do you need a nutritional supplement? By Lynn Little An estimated half of Americans now take some kind of nutritional supplement. The term "nutritional supplement" encompasses a wide range of products with multivitamin/mineral supplements the most commonly used. People cite a variety of reasons for taking supplements, ranging from those that are medically necessary to "popping a couple of pills" as an easier alternative to practicing healthy eating habits. While supplements are beneficial under some circumstances, they are not recommended simply as an alternative to a nutritious diet.
NEWS
June 6, 2000
When we think of bones, we often think of calcium. But several other nutrients work with calcium to develop, strengthen and maintain bones and teeth. The most important are phosphorus, magnesium, vitamin D and fluoride. Recommendations for all five nutrients have been updated by the Food and Nutrition Board of the National Academy of Sciences. The biggest changes are for calcium. For adolescents and teens still building bone, recommended levels increased from 1,200 to 1,300 milligrams per day. For adults to age 50, recommendations increased from 800 to 1,000 milligrams daily.
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