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Butterfly

NEWS
By MARLO BARNHART | October 14, 2008
CLEAR SPRING - Members of Troop 655 Daisy Girl Scouts in Clear Spring are going to be learning more about how things grow starting Saturday. "We are having our first work day at the Clear Spring Garden Club's butterfly garden Oct. 18," said Clare Seibert, co-leader of the troop. Recently, the troop was asked to take over the responsibilities for the unique garden, which is next to the pavilion at the Washington County park in Clear Spring. It is, after all, a perfect pairing.
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NEWS
by Lisa Tedrick Prejean | May 13, 2005
"The Baltimore Checkerspot has orange, black, and white-tipped wings. Its colors make it poisonous to birds. For other predators, it escapes into its nest, throws up or jerks its head. It lays hundreds of eggs, but only a few live to grow up. The rest are usually found and eaten. " I had been thinking about butterflies since the first warm day of spring. When my 10-year-old asked if I would type his report on Maryland, I had no idea I would learn so much about my native state. Most notably, the information included above on the Baltimore Checkerspot, the Maryland state insect.
NEWS
by Dorry Baird Norris | May 12, 2003
Last summer the new butterfly garden outside my office window was finally settling in. At least it was doing as well as could be expected in the drought. The butterfly bush ( Budidleia davidii ) and butterflyweed ( Asclepias tuberosa ) were surviving. The annual bachelor button ( Centaurea cyanus ) seeds I had tossed in were surviving, as was the blue flowered borage ( Borago officinalis ). By September the borage was sprawling in every direction. The violets seemed to have taken hold at the base of the Kousa dogwood.
NEWS
By DAN DEARTH | July 7, 2008
HAGERSTOWN -- The Barbara Ingram School for the Arts Foundation is expected to ask the Hagerstown City Council on Tuesday for permission to place 30 butterfly statues in and around the downtown area next spring as part of a fundraiser for the school. If the council agrees, the foundation will begin soliciting sponsors at $3,000 to $5,000 per statue, said Dale Bannon, director of system development for Washington County Public Schools. The money will be used primarily to hire a sculptor to create the butterflies and artists to paint them.
NEWS
by CANDICE BOSELY | July 28, 2002
martinsburg@herald-mail.com MARTINSBURG, W.Va. - David Levine does not fit the stereotypical image of a CEO. To give a tour of the Martinsburg building he just bought for his company, Butterfly.net, Levine pulls up on a BMW motorcycle, wearing ripped jeans and a leather jacket. His clothes cannot cover the creativity he exudes or the enthusiasm for his company, which is part of the $1 billion industry of Internet gaming. This week, Levine and his 12 employees will move into the former YMCA and Martinsburg City Hall at 224 W. King St. He paid $540,500 for the four-floor building, formerly owned by Martinsburg developer Moncure Chatfield-Taylor.
NEWS
April 1, 2007
John Evans tries to get his butterfly kite airborne Saturday at the annual Kite Festival at the Fairview Outdoor Education Center in Clear Spring.
NEWS
April 30, 2009
Debbie Serig and Allen Hess admire a butterfly sculpture on display in downtown Hagerstown Thursday. The giant insect is covered in copper pennies.
NEWS
April 26, 2009
Man sought by feds wounded during arrest Mourners say goodbye to family slain in murder-suicide Man accused of setting another on fire free on $15K bond Butterfly art emerges Hundreds attend job fair
NEWS
June 2, 2009
Hager's Row in downtown Hagerstown has taken on a new look with spreading ivy, a butterfly sculpture and the new Barbara Ingram School for the Arts in the background.
SPORTS
January 21, 2013
The Hagerstown YMCA sent 10 members of its swim team to compete at the 11th annual Winterfest Invitational, hosted by the Severna Park YMCA at the University of Maryland, College Park, Jan. 11 to 13. The meet is one of the premier YMCA swim competitions in the Northeast. More than 1,500 swimmers from eight states competed. Age 15-18 Allison Martin (16), 100-yard backstroke 1:07.50 (83rd). Age 13-14 Malin Brokstrop (13), 100 backstroke 1:08.79 (85th). Age 11-12 Luke Anders (12)
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