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Brain Tumor

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by KRISTIN WILSON | March 27, 2006
On Dec. 4, 2005 Ian Rogers was a perfectly normal 6-year-old boy who loved chasing bugs, catching spiders and digging in the dirt. But on Dec. 5 he began showing signs of dizziness and became unresponsive. He was rushed to the hospital, where doctors found Ian was bleeding in the area of his brainstem. For three and a half months, the Rogers family, of Hagerstown, watched Ian endure surgeries to drain the fluid accumulating in his brain. They watched as Ian lost the abilities to speak and move his limbs.
NEWS
by TONY BUDNY | July 23, 2005
anthonyb@herald-mail.com Abby Kane, 5, and Elyse Kane, 7, stood and watched as their mother, Jennifer Kane, sat in front of the ABC camera on Friday. "Good Morning America" filmed a short segment on local restaurant The Plum and its fundraising efforts as part of the Alex's Lemonade Stand Fund national campaign. The segment is planned to air the weekend of July 30. "Its sort of weird," Elyse said. "I've never seen her be on TV before. " Elyse and Abby made the lemonade stand signs in front of the restaurant and were very proud of them.
NEWS
by ERIN CUNNINGHAM | July 3, 2006
WASHINGTON COUNTY Four days ago, her son began to speak again. On Sunday, the whispered words were still new, and every few minutes, Heather Rogers would lean over the 6-year-old boy to hear what he had to say. "I hear you talking to me," she said. Seven months ago, Ian Rogers might have been running around with his brother, talking to the bikers and eating pizza. On Sunday, the pair sat at Harley-Davidson Williamsport surrounded by people there to raise money for Ian, who was diagnosed in March with a malignant cancerous brain tumor known as Glioblastoma Multiforme.
NEWS
December 26, 1997
By DAVE McMILLION Staff Writer WILLIAMSPORT - This year has been a particularly tough one for the Williamsport Volunteer Ambulance Service following news that children of two of its members were diagnosed with serious illnesses. Thirteen-year-old Sarah Roseberry, daughter of volunteer Teresa Roseberry, was diagnosed with a malignant brain tumor in September. Six-year-old Jacob Wentz, son of medic George Wentz, was diagnosed with leukemia in late October, officials said.
NEWS
January 30, 2009
-JAN. 25, 2009 Jane (Shobe) Smith, 59, formerly of Hagerstown, Md., died Sunday, Jan. 25, 2009, at home after a long and courageous battle against a brain tumor. She is survived by her husband of 26 years, Ron Smith; and her stepchildren, Susi and Ken Smith of Crofton. She also is survived by her brother, Bob Shobe of Clermont, Fla.; and sisters, Cindy (Shobe) Quinn of Wilmington, Del., and Sharon Trovinger of Frostburg, Md. Jane worked for many years in Washington County's Department of Economic Development.
NEWS
BY KIMBERLY YAKOWSKI | March 8, 2002
Lt. William J. Lucas, commander of the Maryland State Police barracks at Hagerstown, died Wednesday after a year-long battle against cancer. He was 55. Lucas' colleagues said Thursday he was a compassionate, dedicated leader who loved being a state trooper. "He cared about his employees and he didn't play favorites with anyone," state police 1st Sgt. Rick Narron said. Lucas, who won a battle with lung cancer in the 1990s, was diagnosed with a brain tumor about a year ago, Narron said.
NEWS
January 20, 2009
WASHINGTON (AP) -- Sen. Edward M. Kennedy, D-Mass., battling a brain tumor, became ill at a post-inauguration luncheon for President Barack Obama on Tuesday and was rushed by ambulance to a hospital. There was no immediate word from medical personnel on his condition, although fellow senators said he had suffered an apparent seizure and remained conscious as he was taken for further evaluation. A spokeswoman at the Washington Hospital Center, where Kennedy was taken, said he was awake and answering questions.
NEWS
BY Staff Writer | May 20, 2002
laurae@herald-mail.com Betty Lou Rockwell of Cove Gap, Pa., teared up when she saw the words her 8-year-old great-grandson wrote to his father in purple ink. "For my Dad, Kirk Smith, Love Hunter, Your son. Love you Dad. " Hunter was only 2 when he lost his father to acute lymphatic leukemia. "He was just a little boy. He'll never forget his dad. His mother made that promise," Rockwell said. Hunter's memorial was among hundreds displayed for cancer victims and survivors at the Franklin County Relay for Life on Saturday.
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NEWS
By HEATHER KEELS | heather.keels@herald-mail.com | June 17, 2011
Garnet Stevens doesn't think of himself as a control freak. "I'm more of a 'Yes dear, no dear, whatever you want to do dear,'" the Waynesboro Pa. resident said. But last December, when doctors told Stevens he had two brain tumors, he found himself marveling at how much cancer took control of his life. "It controls your schedule ... it controls how your body feels ... it controls when you eat and what you eat," Stevens said Friday evening during the opening ceremony for Relay for Life at Fairgrounds Park in Hagerstown.
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NEWS
By DAVE McMILLION | May 27, 2009
CHARLES TOWN, W.VA. -- Mark Johnston was battling a brain tumor, but he also was living his life, right to the end. The former Jefferson County police officer had been filling out necessary documents for family affairs, and he remained as active as he could despite his medical prognosis. And as always, his humor still was there, his friends in the law enforcement community said. Friends on Wednesday remembered Johnston. Jefferson County Sheriff Robert E. "Bobby" Shirley said Johnston recently showed him a picture of his tumor.
NEWS
By MARLO BARNHART | March 7, 2009
Editor's note: Each Sunday, The Herald-Mail publishes "A Life Remembered. " This continuing series takes a look back -- through the eyes of family, friends, co-workers and others -- at a member of the community who died recently. Today's "A Life Remembered" is about Henry Keating Scheck, who died Feb. 25 at the age of 4. His obituary was published in the Feb. 28 edition of The Herald-Mail. Four-year-old Henry Keating Scheck died Feb. 25 with his family at his bedside. Also nearby was an uninvited companion that had been with the boy for 16 months of his short life -- cancer.
NEWS
January 30, 2009
-JAN. 25, 2009 Jane (Shobe) Smith, 59, formerly of Hagerstown, Md., died Sunday, Jan. 25, 2009, at home after a long and courageous battle against a brain tumor. She is survived by her husband of 26 years, Ron Smith; and her stepchildren, Susi and Ken Smith of Crofton. She also is survived by her brother, Bob Shobe of Clermont, Fla.; and sisters, Cindy (Shobe) Quinn of Wilmington, Del., and Sharon Trovinger of Frostburg, Md. Jane worked for many years in Washington County's Department of Economic Development.
NEWS
January 20, 2009
WASHINGTON (AP) -- Sen. Edward M. Kennedy, D-Mass., battling a brain tumor, became ill at a post-inauguration luncheon for President Barack Obama on Tuesday and was rushed by ambulance to a hospital. There was no immediate word from medical personnel on his condition, although fellow senators said he had suffered an apparent seizure and remained conscious as he was taken for further evaluation. A spokeswoman at the Washington Hospital Center, where Kennedy was taken, said he was awake and answering questions.
NEWS
By DAVE McMILLION | July 20, 2008
CHARLES TOWN, W.VA. - Any doubts that Mark Johnston was back to his old self were put to rest last Halloween. The former local police officer - known for his unique brand of humor - figured he would make a good Shrek. So the bald-headed Johnston set out to dress himself up as the intimidating-looking film figure as a treat for his children. To make sure he got the look right, Johnston wrapped rubber bands around his ears. "I'm still keeping my sense of humor," Johnston said.
NEWS
By ALICIA NOTORIANNI | October 1, 2007
HAGERSTOWN - Fredi Wishard remembers attending a Ride for Kids event in Pittsburgh to benefit the Pediatric Brain Tumor Foundation. A young man who had survived brain surgery addressed the crowd at the Celebration of Life program. He thanked the motorcyclists for their support and shared the poignant story of his life after diagnosis and treatment for a brain tumor. Wishard attended the ride again the following year and asked for an update on the young man. She learned that he had died.
NEWS
by ERIN CUNNINGHAM | July 3, 2006
WASHINGTON COUNTY Four days ago, her son began to speak again. On Sunday, the whispered words were still new, and every few minutes, Heather Rogers would lean over the 6-year-old boy to hear what he had to say. "I hear you talking to me," she said. Seven months ago, Ian Rogers might have been running around with his brother, talking to the bikers and eating pizza. On Sunday, the pair sat at Harley-Davidson Williamsport surrounded by people there to raise money for Ian, who was diagnosed in March with a malignant cancerous brain tumor known as Glioblastoma Multiforme.
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