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NEWS
Lisa Prejean | July 4, 2013
After attending an all-day continuing education class for teachers and then two days worth of orientation programs at a public university, I am on acronym overload. I don't think my brain can process even one more abbreviation, so, please, don't send one my way. According to Webster's New World College Dictionary, an acronym is a word formed from the first (or first few) letters of a series of words, such as radar, from radio detecting and ranging. The first two letters in radio - ra - added to the “d” in “detecting” - rad - added to the “a” in “and” - rada - added to the “r” in “ranging” = radar . But most people don't even have radar on their acronym radar.
OPINION
November 14, 2011
Boy, what a week for me to take off. Just my luck, it turned out to be one of the most amazing news weeks of the year. Joe Paterno is fired, the Earth is nearly hit by an asteroid and ... and ... (54 seconds go by) sorry, I just can't seem to put my finger on that third thing. Oh right, I remember. Republican debate. Yeah, man. I've never had lunch with Rick Perry, obviously, but I wonder how often he's wound up with a bacon and lettuce sandwich. If this had been Herman Cain, he'd only have a 99 plan.
NEWS
by LISA TEDRICK PREJEAN | July 5, 2002
"I think you need a brain break. " When my son gets frustrated with or tired of a project, he often hears me say those words. It's summertime, after all, and we all deserve some refreshment and relaxation. While I don't want him to forget everything he learned in school this year, I do want him to have some fun, like I did when I was his age. It's amazing what kids will learn if we give them some down time to merely explore and wonder at creation. Here are some brain breaks I've given - or plan to give - my kids this summer.
NEWS
by TRISH RUDDER | February 1, 2005
trishr@herald-mail.com BERKELEY SPRINGS, W.VA. - The relationship between the brain and stomach will be the main course at the book discussion on appetite and satiety Feb. 7 at 7 p.m. at the Berkeley Springs High School auditorium. The Monday night discussion is one of several scheduled through April on Being Healthy in Morgan County. Bill Lands of the Morgan County Forum for Arts, Sciences and Technologies (FAST), said the discussions are part of the 2005 Health Olympics to help all Morgan County residents learn about the benefits of healthy eating.
NEWS
June 1, 1999
How much does the average person's brain weigh? The weight of the average adult's brain is about 3 pounds. At birth, the brain tips the scales at a mere 3 ounces.
LIFESTYLE
July 22, 2011
War Memorial Hospital and Valley Health Wellness & Fitness Services will offer "Mind Aerobics," a series of classes to exercise your brain, from 10 to 11:30 a.m. Wednesday, Aug. 10 to 31, at War Memorial Hospital. Kelly Walker, a health educator, will present Mind Aerobics, a four-week program designed to learn more about the brain, mental decline, and cognitive techniques to exercise the brain. The cost is $35. Registration is required by Friday, Aug. 5. For more information or to register, call 800-662-7831.
NEWS
By KATE S. ALEXANDER | August 31, 2010
Williamsport native Dr. Cara Sedney never thought becoming a brain surgeon would land her on television. As a neurosurgery resident at West Virginia University's Ruby Memorial Hospital in Morgantown, W.Va., television is not something she has time for in her busy schedule. But on Thursday at 10 p.m., Sedney and the team of doctors in the neurosurgery department led by Dr. Julian Bailes will be featured on an episode of ABC News' "Nightline Prime: Secrets of Your Mind, Why We Do What We Do. " A camera crew followed the 1999 Williamsport High School graduate and her colleagues around Ruby Memorial Hospital for months, watching and recording as they treated patients.
NEWS
by BONNIE H. BRECHBILL | December 23, 2004
bonnieb@herald-mail.com BALTIMORE - Billi Ruppenthal is determined to have a traditional Christmas for her family. This year's Christmas tree stands on a dresser in her 12-year-old son's hospital room at Kennedy Krieger Institute in Baltimore. Her son, Alex Munson, a seventh-grader at Southern Fulton Jr./Sr. High School in Warfordsburg, Pa., collapsed at school on Oct. 18 after complaining of head pain and dizziness. "We're not going to let the holiday go by without us. I couldn't imagine it not being Christmas for my kids," she said by phone from Baltimore earlier this week.
OPINION
By ALLAN POWELL | December 13, 2012
Ongoing research on the structure of the brain has the potential to give us a clearer understanding of the relative influence of nature (our inherited traits) and nurture (our acquired cultural traits). Sebastian Seung, professor of computational neuroscience and physics at MIT, is involved in important and extremely complicated studies of the brain to uncover the role of the brain in determining our uniqueness. He is convinced that the pattern of connections between the brain's neurons might give some clue to the answer.
NEWS
by TRISH RUDDER | February 1, 2005
trishr@herald-mail.com BERKELEY SPRINGS, W.VA. - The relationship between the brain and stomach will be the main course at the book discussion on appetite and satiety Feb. 7 at 7 p.m. at the Berkeley Springs High School auditorium. The Monday night discussion is one of several scheduled through April on Being Healthy in Morgan County. Bill Lands of the Morgan County Forum for Arts, Sciences and Technologies (FAST), said the discussions are part of the 2005 Health Olympics to help all Morgan County residents learn about the benefits of healthy eating.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
Lisa Prejean | July 4, 2013
After attending an all-day continuing education class for teachers and then two days worth of orientation programs at a public university, I am on acronym overload. I don't think my brain can process even one more abbreviation, so, please, don't send one my way. According to Webster's New World College Dictionary, an acronym is a word formed from the first (or first few) letters of a series of words, such as radar, from radio detecting and ranging. The first two letters in radio - ra - added to the “d” in “detecting” - rad - added to the “a” in “and” - rada - added to the “r” in “ranging” = radar . But most people don't even have radar on their acronym radar.
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NEWS
By DAVE McMILLION | davem@herald-mail.com | April 7, 2013
Seventeen teams matched wits Sunday in a competition that put their trivia skills to the test while helping to promote literacy in the Eastern Panhandle. The 16th annual Brain Games, a fundraiser for Literacy Volunteers of the Eastern Panhandle, was held at James Rumsey Technical Institute. The competition consisted of four rounds of 25 written questions.  Teams of up to six people had 15 minutes to answer each round of questions. Each correct answer earned a team a point. "S" Words for $400, Alex, The Herald-Mail Co. team, won the event with a score of 71. The team has won the contest seven times and has been the victor in the last four games, said team member Bob Fleenor, a five-time “Jeopardy!
LIFESTYLE
By BOB GARVER | Special to The Herald-Mail | March 11, 2013
I was talking with my mom the other day and we agreed that 1939's "The Wizard of Oz" was my first favorite movie.  When I was a toddler I would make her impersonate the characters for hours on end, I owned toy models of all the characters, my first Halloween costume was the Tin Man, and, of course, I watched the movie enough times to make my poor parents sick of it. I knew there was basically no chance that the new prequel "Oz the Great and Powerful"...
OPINION
By ALLAN POWELL | December 13, 2012
Ongoing research on the structure of the brain has the potential to give us a clearer understanding of the relative influence of nature (our inherited traits) and nurture (our acquired cultural traits). Sebastian Seung, professor of computational neuroscience and physics at MIT, is involved in important and extremely complicated studies of the brain to uncover the role of the brain in determining our uniqueness. He is convinced that the pattern of connections between the brain's neurons might give some clue to the answer.
LIFESTYLE
By MARIE GILBERT | marieg@herald-mail.com | September 21, 2012
Friday night lights. Gridiron glory. With the start of a new school year comes another fall ritual - the return of football. But as teams step onto the field, coaches are chalking more than Xs and Os. Concussions are now part of their play books. There was a time when head traumas were called dingers and playing with injury was a sign of toughness. You got your bell rung, you sat out a play and then went right back into the huddle. But with former National Football League players bringing more public attention to the topic, the affects of concussions are being addressed at all levels of athletics, including youth programs.
NEWS
August 30, 2012
The trial of a Hagerstown man accused earlier this year of assaulting a child and causing permanent brain damage was rescheduled Thursday in Washington County Circuit Court for two days in November. Darryl Xavier Talley Jr., 25, of 1317 Jay Drive, is charged with first-degree child abuse resulting in severe physical injury, second-degree child abuse and first- and second-degree assault in an incident that occurred on or about March 22 or 23, according to court records. A jury trial was scheduled for Thursday, but the state filed a motion to continue the case.
NEWS
By DAN DEARTH | dan.dearth@herald-mail.com | August 13, 2012
The trial of a Hagerstown man charged with causing permanent brain damage to a child will be postponed until attorneys for both sides can obtain medical records detailing the victim's injuries. Washington County Circuit Judge Daniel P. Dwyer on Monday granted a motion to postpone the trial of Darryl Xavier Talley Jr., 25, of 1317 Jay Drive. Washington County Assistant State's Attorney Michele Hansen said after the hearing that attorneys have not received the medical records of Kaleb Marcello Adams from Children's National Medical Center inWashington, D.C. Talley has been charged with one count each of first-degree assault, second-degree assault and second-degree child abuse.
OPINION
By TIM ROWLAND | timr@herald-mail.com | June 20, 2012
I like to think that my vast surplus of brain energy simply overwhelms lesser machines. That's why every electronic or mechanical device I touch breaks. This is the only explanation that fits. My prodigious brain waves crowd out computer code, operating signals and electronic impulses emanating from a Dr. Suess array of widgets, blidgets, capacitors, dabnapators, transistors and wanflistors, What chance does, say, the remote handset of a telephone have of receiving messages from its base station when the room is jammed by my thunderous thoughts?
NEWS
By DAN DEARTH | dan.dearth@herald-mail.com | May 29, 2012
A delayed autopsy report prompted a Washington County Circuit Court judge on Tuesday to postpone the trial of a Hagerstown man who is charged in the October 2011 death of a 2-year-old boy. Washington County Circuit Judge M. Kenneth Long set Brian Michael Miller's trial date for Sept. 11. Miller, 33, of 360 Buena Vista Ave., is charged with 16 counts, including first-degree murder, second-degree murder and manslaughter in the death of Logan Sellers, according to court documents.
LIFESTYLE
By COURTNEY BRADFORD | Special to The Herald-Mail | May 12, 2012
A good scholarship pageant contestant has to have a lot of things going for her, according to Megan Kiley, Miss Washington County Outstanding Teen. "Beauty is just the icing on the cake," she said. A junior at Boonsboro High School, Megan, 17, decided to enter the Miss Washington County Outstanding Teen scholarship pageant after her dance teacher suggested she enter the Miss Frederick Outstanding Teen competition. Megan competed and was crowned with her title in February during the Miss Washington County/Miss Western Maryland pageant at The Maryland Theatre in Hagerstown.
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