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NEWS
by LISA TEDRICK PREJEAN | August 9, 2002
"What makes our feet fall asleep?" My son asked the question while gingerly walking through the kitchen, pausing to grimace after every other step. Obviously, he had a vested interest in this answer. One foot was asleep and the other was, shall we say, awake. "Well, it probably has something to do with the way you were sitting," I replied. Sometimes we sit or lie in a way that there's pressure against an artery, says Dr. Mark Roemer, a podiatrist with Podiatry Associates in Hagerstown and Martinsburg, W.Va.
NEWS
by CHRISTINE L. MOATS | June 3, 2002
Q: What is a stroke? A: A stroke occurs when blood flow to any part of the brain is obstructed. Blood is the fuel or energy for our brains as food is for our bodies. If the obstruction continues for several minutes, the injury to the brain becomes permanent and the tissue in that area dies. The loss or change in bodily function is a result of the loss of blood flow to the brain. There are two types of stroke. An ischemic stroke happens when there is a blockage within a vessel in the brain.
NEWS
by Christine L. Moats | February 16, 2004
Regular exercise offers many benefits, including the prevention of heart disease. Studies show that people who are physically fit through regular exercise reduce their risk of heart attack by 50 percent. Like other muscles in our bodies, the heart becomes stronger and more efficient through exercise. According to Pam Peitz, manager of Washington County Hospital's Cardiac Rehab and Congestive Heart Failure programs, this results in a lower blood pressure and a lower resting heart rate.
NEWS
December 11, 2000
Cramming for finals By JOE ARCH As the holidays approach, the semester ends. Finals are on the horizon. Stress becomes intense. As a college student, I know how hard it can be at this time of year. continued So I spoke with Marie E. Nowakowski, a licensed psychologist and student consultant at Hagerstown Community College; Linda Fernandez, director for curriculum and professional development for Washington County Board of Education; and Nanette Hatzes, director of the Learning Center at Penn State Mont Alto.
NEWS
By MARLO BARNHART | February 6, 2000
Recent newspaper articles about strides in the treatment of heart disease and prevention of heart attacks reawakened Hagerstown resident William G. Gregg's memories of his father, a physician recognized worldwide for making many of those advances. While Dr. Donald Eaton Gregg died 17 years ago, his son said his years of research paved the way for improvements in today's surgical techniques to reverse the effects of heart disease. Among William Gregg's treasured mementos of his father is a picture of Dr. Gregg standing outside the White House with President John F. Kennedy in 1962.
NEWS
by Khrys Thompson | May 3, 2004
Every 45 seconds, someone in America has a stroke. Every three minutes, someone dies of one. Stroke is the nation's third most prevalent cause of death, ranking behind heart disease and all forms of cancer. Because women live longer than men, more women than men die of stroke each year. However, due in part to increased awareness, the death rate from stroke has been declining in the past few years. About 4.8 million stroke survivors are alive today, and, despite having long-term consequences from their stroke, about half of them are living in their home with help from family, friends and their community.
NEWS
by Christine L. Moats | July 14, 2003
It is important to be aware of the many factors that may lead to coronary heart disease and stroke. While we cannot control age, gender or heredity, we can control other factors. Two of the most important are high blood pressure and high cholesterol. You should have them both checked regularly. When you have your blood pressure taken, it will be measured by two numbers. The first number, the systolic pressure, is the pressure of your blood flow when your heart beats. The second, the diastolic pressure, is the pressure between heartbeats.
LIFESTYLE
By MARIE GILBERT | marieg@herald-mail.com | September 16, 2011
Phil Cosentino never has been one to sit back and watch life go by. Instead, he lives it to the fullest. He's a runner who participates in everything from trail races to half marathons. He loves to ski and has logged more than 30 scuba dives. And, although he's an attorney by profession, he's a bit of a landscaper - the dirtier the project the better. To most people, including Cosentino, he seemed the picture of good health. "I have always been very active.
NEWS
by Jessica Hanlin | November 19, 2002
"What? Where am I?" You ask groggily, lifting your throbbing head. "Oh golly!" You realize you fell asleep over your homework. Now, its 11 p.m., and you haven't even started. So you grab a can of soda and buckle down for a long night of studying. Everyone has had this experience at least once, if not every night. The culprit? Too much school work? Procrastination? More than likely. But what makes it all the more difficult for you is the very thing you are looking for to help you out of this pickle - caffeine.
NEWS
by JANET HEIM | March 21, 2006
"Don't forget the coffee can for Allyson," said Annie Woods, 85, as fellow residents of Francis Murphy Apartments passed by her display in the lobby last Wednesday and Thursday. "Any kind of donation, we accept," she added. The springtime display - a coffee can for donations dressed up in a gift bag, two small pink stuffed animals, a bowl of Hershey's Kisses and a greeting card to sign - was the brainchild of Woods, who wanted to do something to help the family of Allyson Semler, an 11-month-old Hagerstown resident who has a rare progressive disease.
ARTICLES BY DATE
LIFESTYLE
By MARIE GILBERT | marieg@herald-mail.com | September 16, 2011
Phil Cosentino never has been one to sit back and watch life go by. Instead, he lives it to the fullest. He's a runner who participates in everything from trail races to half marathons. He loves to ski and has logged more than 30 scuba dives. And, although he's an attorney by profession, he's a bit of a landscaper - the dirtier the project the better. To most people, including Cosentino, he seemed the picture of good health. "I have always been very active.
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NEWS
by BOB MAGINNIS | July 12, 2006
The smile on her tiny face is angelic, but when you see the scar peeping out of the top of her play gear, you know she's been through more than any baby should have to endure. Her name is Alivia Koontz, a Hagerstown-area 2-year-old born with a heart condition known as hypoplastic left heart syndrome, or HLHS. She has already had two operations to allow the right side of her heart to do by itself what both sides usually do together. After doing a heart catheterization last August, doctors at the Nemours Cardiac Center in Delaware decided to wait on the third surgery until this summer, to give Alivia time to get a little bit older and gain more weight.
NEWS
by JANET HEIM | March 21, 2006
"Don't forget the coffee can for Allyson," said Annie Woods, 85, as fellow residents of Francis Murphy Apartments passed by her display in the lobby last Wednesday and Thursday. "Any kind of donation, we accept," she added. The springtime display - a coffee can for donations dressed up in a gift bag, two small pink stuffed animals, a bowl of Hershey's Kisses and a greeting card to sign - was the brainchild of Woods, who wanted to do something to help the family of Allyson Semler, an 11-month-old Hagerstown resident who has a rare progressive disease.
NEWS
by Khrys Thompson | May 3, 2004
Every 45 seconds, someone in America has a stroke. Every three minutes, someone dies of one. Stroke is the nation's third most prevalent cause of death, ranking behind heart disease and all forms of cancer. Because women live longer than men, more women than men die of stroke each year. However, due in part to increased awareness, the death rate from stroke has been declining in the past few years. About 4.8 million stroke survivors are alive today, and, despite having long-term consequences from their stroke, about half of them are living in their home with help from family, friends and their community.
NEWS
by Christine L. Moats | February 16, 2004
Regular exercise offers many benefits, including the prevention of heart disease. Studies show that people who are physically fit through regular exercise reduce their risk of heart attack by 50 percent. Like other muscles in our bodies, the heart becomes stronger and more efficient through exercise. According to Pam Peitz, manager of Washington County Hospital's Cardiac Rehab and Congestive Heart Failure programs, this results in a lower blood pressure and a lower resting heart rate.
NEWS
by Christine L. Moats | July 14, 2003
It is important to be aware of the many factors that may lead to coronary heart disease and stroke. While we cannot control age, gender or heredity, we can control other factors. Two of the most important are high blood pressure and high cholesterol. You should have them both checked regularly. When you have your blood pressure taken, it will be measured by two numbers. The first number, the systolic pressure, is the pressure of your blood flow when your heart beats. The second, the diastolic pressure, is the pressure between heartbeats.
NEWS
by Jessica Hanlin | November 19, 2002
"What? Where am I?" You ask groggily, lifting your throbbing head. "Oh golly!" You realize you fell asleep over your homework. Now, its 11 p.m., and you haven't even started. So you grab a can of soda and buckle down for a long night of studying. Everyone has had this experience at least once, if not every night. The culprit? Too much school work? Procrastination? More than likely. But what makes it all the more difficult for you is the very thing you are looking for to help you out of this pickle - caffeine.
NEWS
by LISA TEDRICK PREJEAN | August 9, 2002
"What makes our feet fall asleep?" My son asked the question while gingerly walking through the kitchen, pausing to grimace after every other step. Obviously, he had a vested interest in this answer. One foot was asleep and the other was, shall we say, awake. "Well, it probably has something to do with the way you were sitting," I replied. Sometimes we sit or lie in a way that there's pressure against an artery, says Dr. Mark Roemer, a podiatrist with Podiatry Associates in Hagerstown and Martinsburg, W.Va.
NEWS
by CHRISTINE L. MOATS | June 3, 2002
Q: What is a stroke? A: A stroke occurs when blood flow to any part of the brain is obstructed. Blood is the fuel or energy for our brains as food is for our bodies. If the obstruction continues for several minutes, the injury to the brain becomes permanent and the tissue in that area dies. The loss or change in bodily function is a result of the loss of blood flow to the brain. There are two types of stroke. An ischemic stroke happens when there is a blockage within a vessel in the brain.
NEWS
December 11, 2000
Cramming for finals By JOE ARCH As the holidays approach, the semester ends. Finals are on the horizon. Stress becomes intense. As a college student, I know how hard it can be at this time of year. continued So I spoke with Marie E. Nowakowski, a licensed psychologist and student consultant at Hagerstown Community College; Linda Fernandez, director for curriculum and professional development for Washington County Board of Education; and Nanette Hatzes, director of the Learning Center at Penn State Mont Alto.
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