Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: HeraldMail HomeCollectionsBlair Mountain
IN THE NEWS

Blair Mountain

RELATED KEYWORDS:
FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
by DAVE McMILLION | December 31, 2002
CHARLES TOWN, W.Va. - The history surrounding the treason trials at the Jefferson County Courthouse stemmed from an effort by coal miners to unionize Logan County in 1922. The Battle of Blair Mountain resulted, involving warfare that included machine guns and aerial bombardment. About 2,000 federal troops were called in to stop the fighting, according to a history of the courthouse compiled by Berkeley County Circuit Judge David Sanders. A special grand jury was convened and 738 indictments were returned, charging treason and murder, Sanders said.
NEWS
by DAVE McMILLION | September 27, 2004
charlestown@herald-mail.com CHARLES TOWN, W.Va. - Jefferson County officials have agreed to conduct a historical review on a group of county office buildings along Washington Street that may be torn down for new office space, officials said. The historical review, which will be conducted by TRC of Nashville, Tenn., will examine issues such as the physical characteristics of the buildings and whether they have any history significance, said Jefferson County Commission member Jane Tabb.
NEWS
by DAVE McMILLION | January 23, 2007
CHARLES TOWN, W.Va. - Despite concerns from a preservation group about how the process of restoring the old Jefferson County Jail was proceeding, a judge agreed Monday to lift an injunction protecting the historic building. Jefferson County Circuit Court Judge Thomas W. Steptoe Jr. heard from an attorney that the last stage in a historical review process for the jail was a letter from a state agency signing off on plans for the building. Steptoe said it appears that letter is coming soon and that the injunction could be lifted when the letter is received by the Jefferson County Commission.
NEWS
By DAVE McMILLION | September 7, 2008
CHARLES TOWN, W.VA. - The story of the 1922 miner treason trials in Charles Town is about to come full circle. The trials were the result of an ugly turn of events in the southern West Virginia coalfields as miners fought over union issues, and Doug Estepp said it was a story that was not talked about often. In fact, Estepp said, it was a story that often was suppressed and authors who wrote about it found it hard getting anyone to talk about it. Now, Jefferson County residents are helping to bring the story to life in a party being planned Sept.
NEWS
April 7, 2006
Committee formed to study jail uses CHARLES TOWN, W.Va. - Jefferson County Commission members decided Thursday to appoint a committee to determine ways to do historical interpretation in the old Jefferson County Jail. The committee could look at efforts such as wall displays in the old jail at the corner of George and Liberty streets, said Commission member Jane Tabb. The committee will develop recommendations and present them to the commission for consideration, said commission member Dale Manuel.
NEWS
by DAVE McMILLION | February 7, 2003
charlestown@herald-mail.com More than two years of debate about what to do with the old Jefferson County Jail came to a head Thursday night when the Jefferson County Commissioners voted 3-2 to tear down the 85-year-old building. Commission President Jane Tabb along with Commissioners James G. Knode and Al Hooper voted to tear down the jail despite concerns from Commissioners Greg Corliss and Rusty Morgan that the county was moving too quickly on the issue. Corliss wanted the commission to hold off on the demolition until it hears from a state agency that was formed to review the needs of aging courthouses in the state.
NEWS
September 6, 2008
CHARLES TOWN, W.Va. -- The story of the 1922 miner treason trials in Charles Town is about to come full circle. The trials were the result of an ugly turn of events in the southern West Virginia coalfields as miners fought over union issues, and Doug Estepp said it was a story that was not talked about often. In fact, Estepp said it was a story that often was suppressed and authors who wrote about it found it hard getting anyone to talk about it. Now, Jefferson County residents are helping to bring the story to life in a big party being planned Sept.
NEWS
by DAVE McMILLION | August 13, 2004
charlestown@herald-mail.com CHARLES TOWN, W.Va. - Demolition of the old Jefferson County Jail would have an adverse effect on Charles Town's historic district and the historic Jefferson County Courthouse, according to a historical review of the jail that was released Thursday. According to the review, demolition of the jail would: Damage the north facade of the courthouse. The 85-year-old jail, at the intersection of George and Liberty streets, is connected to the back of the courthouse.
NEWS
By MATTHEW UMSTEAD | July 18, 2008
CHARLES TOWN, W.Va. -- Coal mining is very much a strong thread in the life of country music singer Kathy Mattea. The Kanawha County, W.Va., native's grandfathers were miners, her mother worked for the United Mine Workers and her brother still works in the coal industry. Jefferson County's historic ties to one of the coal industry's most tumultuous times in state mining history provided a strand for the singer's visit Friday to the county's old jail in Charles Town. During a two-hour stop between shows in Morristown, N.J., and Orkney Springs, Va., Mattea toured the recently restored living quarters of the county jailer and the adjoining cell block, both of which have been converted for state circuit and family court.
NEWS
By RICHARD F. BELISLE | September 21, 2010
CHARLES TOWN, W.Va. -- In September 1921, 20,000 armed union coal miners tried to wrest a makeshift army of 10,000 mine operators and guards, nonunion miners and local "militia" off a mountain ridge near Logan, W.Va. Called "The Battle of Blair Mountain," it was one of several major incidents in the West Virginia mine wars of the 1920s. The violence got so bad that President Warren G. Harding sent in 500 U.S. Army troops to quell the insurrection. More than 700 miners were indicted for treason against the state.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By RICHARD F. BELISLE | September 21, 2010
CHARLES TOWN, W.Va. -- In September 1921, 20,000 armed union coal miners tried to wrest a makeshift army of 10,000 mine operators and guards, nonunion miners and local "militia" off a mountain ridge near Logan, W.Va. Called "The Battle of Blair Mountain," it was one of several major incidents in the West Virginia mine wars of the 1920s. The violence got so bad that President Warren G. Harding sent in 500 U.S. Army troops to quell the insurrection. More than 700 miners were indicted for treason against the state.
Advertisement
NEWS
By DAVE McMILLION | September 7, 2008
CHARLES TOWN, W.VA. - The story of the 1922 miner treason trials in Charles Town is about to come full circle. The trials were the result of an ugly turn of events in the southern West Virginia coalfields as miners fought over union issues, and Doug Estepp said it was a story that was not talked about often. In fact, Estepp said, it was a story that often was suppressed and authors who wrote about it found it hard getting anyone to talk about it. Now, Jefferson County residents are helping to bring the story to life in a party being planned Sept.
NEWS
September 6, 2008
CHARLES TOWN, W.Va. -- The story of the 1922 miner treason trials in Charles Town is about to come full circle. The trials were the result of an ugly turn of events in the southern West Virginia coalfields as miners fought over union issues, and Doug Estepp said it was a story that was not talked about often. In fact, Estepp said it was a story that often was suppressed and authors who wrote about it found it hard getting anyone to talk about it. Now, Jefferson County residents are helping to bring the story to life in a big party being planned Sept.
NEWS
By MATTHEW UMSTEAD | July 19, 2008
CHARLES TOWN, W.VA. - Coal mining is very much a strong thread in the life of country music singer Kathy Mattea. The Kanawha County, W.Va., native's grandfathers were miners, her mother worked for the United Mine Workers and her brother still works in the coal industry. Jefferson County's historic ties to one of the coal industry's most tumultuous times in state mining history provided a strand for the singer's visit Friday to the county's old jail in Charles Town. During a two-hour stop between shows in Morristown, N.J., and Orkney Springs, Va., Mattea toured the recently restored living quarters of the county jailer and the adjoining cell block, both of which have been converted for state circuit and family court.
NEWS
By MATTHEW UMSTEAD | July 18, 2008
CHARLES TOWN, W.Va. -- Coal mining is very much a strong thread in the life of country music singer Kathy Mattea. The Kanawha County, W.Va., native's grandfathers were miners, her mother worked for the United Mine Workers and her brother still works in the coal industry. Jefferson County's historic ties to one of the coal industry's most tumultuous times in state mining history provided a strand for the singer's visit Friday to the county's old jail in Charles Town. During a two-hour stop between shows in Morristown, N.J., and Orkney Springs, Va., Mattea toured the recently restored living quarters of the county jailer and the adjoining cell block, both of which have been converted for state circuit and family court.
NEWS
by DAVE McMILLION | January 23, 2007
CHARLES TOWN, W.Va. - Despite concerns from a preservation group about how the process of restoring the old Jefferson County Jail was proceeding, a judge agreed Monday to lift an injunction protecting the historic building. Jefferson County Circuit Court Judge Thomas W. Steptoe Jr. heard from an attorney that the last stage in a historical review process for the jail was a letter from a state agency signing off on plans for the building. Steptoe said it appears that letter is coming soon and that the injunction could be lifted when the letter is received by the Jefferson County Commission.
NEWS
April 7, 2006
Committee formed to study jail uses CHARLES TOWN, W.Va. - Jefferson County Commission members decided Thursday to appoint a committee to determine ways to do historical interpretation in the old Jefferson County Jail. The committee could look at efforts such as wall displays in the old jail at the corner of George and Liberty streets, said Commission member Jane Tabb. The committee will develop recommendations and present them to the commission for consideration, said commission member Dale Manuel.
NEWS
by DAVE McMILLION | September 27, 2004
charlestown@herald-mail.com CHARLES TOWN, W.Va. - Jefferson County officials have agreed to conduct a historical review on a group of county office buildings along Washington Street that may be torn down for new office space, officials said. The historical review, which will be conducted by TRC of Nashville, Tenn., will examine issues such as the physical characteristics of the buildings and whether they have any history significance, said Jefferson County Commission member Jane Tabb.
NEWS
by DAVE McMILLION | August 13, 2004
charlestown@herald-mail.com CHARLES TOWN, W.Va. - Demolition of the old Jefferson County Jail would have an adverse effect on Charles Town's historic district and the historic Jefferson County Courthouse, according to a historical review of the jail that was released Thursday. According to the review, demolition of the jail would: Damage the north facade of the courthouse. The 85-year-old jail, at the intersection of George and Liberty streets, is connected to the back of the courthouse.
NEWS
by DAVE McMILLION | February 7, 2003
charlestown@herald-mail.com More than two years of debate about what to do with the old Jefferson County Jail came to a head Thursday night when the Jefferson County Commissioners voted 3-2 to tear down the 85-year-old building. Commission President Jane Tabb along with Commissioners James G. Knode and Al Hooper voted to tear down the jail despite concerns from Commissioners Greg Corliss and Rusty Morgan that the county was moving too quickly on the issue. Corliss wanted the commission to hold off on the demolition until it hears from a state agency that was formed to review the needs of aging courthouses in the state.
The Herald-Mail Articles
|