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Black Pepper

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NEWS
Scott Anderson | Culinary Passion | March 21, 2011
Everybody loves brussels sprouts. Hey, wait a minute, that's me. I love them, and can't get enough of them. Alas, they don't go well with my blood thinners so I can't eat as many as I'd like. From Rachael Ray to "Cook This, Not That" — everyone tries to get the unsuspecting patron to eat these lovely garden gnomes. Yet these poor little sprouts often end up cast aside or tossed to the family dog. So, take this recipe, change it up to make it your own and go out there and bring new life to these miniature cabbages.
NEWS
June 18, 2008
1/2 cup reduced-fat mayonnaise 1/2 cup reduced-fat sour cream 2 tablespoons lemon juice 1/8 teaspoon cayenne pepper 1 teaspoon salt 1/2 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper 8 ounces whole-wheat elbow macaroni (or other small shape) 1 cup grated carrots 1 cup thinly sliced celery 1 cup cherry tomatoes, halved 1 medium red bell pepper, seeded and diced 1/2 cup chopped scallions To make the dressing, in a medium bowl, whisk together the mayonnaise, sour cream, lemon juice, cayenne pepper, salt and black pepper.
NEWS
September 26, 2007
1 tablespoon sliced shallots 1 teaspoon cracked black pepper 1/2 cup white wine 1 cup heavy cream 2 garlic cloves, blanched 4 ounces, arugula Salt and pepper, to taste To blanch garlic, place the cloves in boiling water for 30 seconds. Remove the garlic and place it in ice water for one minute, allowing the garlic to become completely chilled. In a saucepan, cook the shallots and cracked black pepper over low heat until the shallots become translucent. Deglaze the pan with the wine.
NEWS
July 7, 2009
The Herald-Mail would like to publish penny-pinching, tasty recipes by thrifty cooks in the Tri-State area on the Food page every week. Contact staff writer Julie Greene at 301-733-5131 or 800-626-6397, ext. 2320, or
NEWS
Scott Anderson | Culinary Passion | August 21, 2011
OK, so you are probably wondering why I'm so crabby. Well, it's a delicious protein that is so easy to us. in a variety of ways. I love the flavor, texture, and the way it takes to just about every dish I create. You will have to forgive my lack of style, however, in that I am simply adding ingredients to this dish based upon what I use on the mainland.  I've never been to Hawaii, but if one of my loyal readers ever heads that way and needs a personal chef, give me a call, I'd be glad to taste my way across the Hawaiian Islands with you. - Scott C. Anderson is associate food service director and chef with Shepherd University dining services in Shepherdstown, W.Va., and Chef Ambassador to the Wisconsin Milk Marketing Board.
LIFESTYLE
March 26, 2013
Mary Mallery is a member of the Friends of Washington County Free Library. She is also the possessor of a family cooking secret. "This (mixed seasoning for meat) is a recipe from my grandmother," Mallery wrote in an email. "She prepared supplies of this seasoning and freely gave it to others. She shared this recipe with me, but I was forbidden to share it with anyone else during her lifetime. "  Mallery said her grandmother was a superb natural cook. "She judged what she was preparing by deciding if it looked right, felt right, smelled right and so on," she said.
NEWS
February 27, 2008
2 tablespoons canola or vegetable oil 1 medium onion, diced 6 garlic cloves, minced 1/4 teaspoon ground cloves 1/2 teaspoon cinnamon 1/4 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper 1/2 teaspoon red pepper flakes 1 tablespoon cocoa powder 1 cup smooth almond butter 1 cup canned crushed tomatoes 2 cups chicken broth 1/4 teaspoon salt 1 slice white bread, cut into small pieces 1 1/2 pounds boneless, skinless chicken breasts, cut...
LIFESTYLE
December 14, 2011
This recipe for steamed shrimp came from my paternal grandmother, Emma C. Potter Fitz Baker. Emma was born in 1890 and died in 1962, and our family loves her steamed shrimp recipe still today. This recipe can be adjusted for a small dinner or a large gathering. This recipe was created before Old Bay seasoning was in existence. In fact, I think this recipe is better than any Old Bay recipe. - Dawn Fitz Lowenhaupt is a member of the Otterbein United Methodist Church hand bell choir Steamed shrimp For each pound of uncooked shrimp add: 1 heaping tablespoon of salt 1/2 teaspoon ground red pepper 1 teaspoon celery seed 1 tablespoon Worcestershire sauce 2 cans of beer Black pepper Uncooked shrimp Mix together all ingredients except shrimp in a pot. Add shrimp, stir and cover mixture with black pepper.
NEWS
February 27, 2008
Start to finish: 12 minutes 5 cups la nueva ropa vieja (3 cups broth and 2 cups meat/vegetable mixture), defrosted if frozen; recipe below 2 cups water 1 can (14 1/2 ounces) diced tomatoes seasoned with onions and garlic (see Cook's note) 1 can (15 ounces) black beans 1 1/2 cups frozen yellow corn kernels Juice from 1/2 lime 2 teaspoons Worcestershire sauce 1 teaspoon sugar 1/2 teaspoon onion powder 1/2 teaspoon garlic powder 1/4 teaspoon black pepper 6 tablespoons crushed baked tortilla chips, or more to taste Optional toppings: shredded Mexican-blend cheese or cheddar, reduced-fat sour cream, avocado chunks Cook's note: Any type of seasoned, diced tomatoes that contain garlic can be used.
NEWS
February 6, 2008
8 ounces whole-grain elbow macaroni 1 tablespoon all-purpose flour 1 cup fat-free milk (divided) 1 cup grated extra-sharp cheddar cheese 2 teaspoons Dijon mustard 1/4 teaspoon salt 1/4 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper 1/4 teaspoon nutmeg 1/8 teaspoon ground ancho chili pepper 1 1/2 cups 2 percent cottage cheese 3 tablespoons unseasoned breadcrumbs 1 teaspoon extra-virgin olive oil 3 tablespoons grated Parmesan cheese ...
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
Scott Anderson | Culinary Passion | July 25, 2013
This is another delicious recipe from the depths of grilling and flame.  The deliciousness of these chops is in the thick cut and high quality of meat.   It's also in how you treat them before they hit the grill.   I've built up a nice marinade with layers of flavor, but, as always, don't just go by my recipe.  Add to it, take away, try something new and create your own recipe.   Scott C. Anderson is associate food service director and chef with Shepherd University dining services in Shepherdstown, W.Va., and Chef Ambassador to the Wisconsin Milk Marketing Board.
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LIFESTYLE
March 26, 2013
Mary Mallery is a member of the Friends of Washington County Free Library. She is also the possessor of a family cooking secret. "This (mixed seasoning for meat) is a recipe from my grandmother," Mallery wrote in an email. "She prepared supplies of this seasoning and freely gave it to others. She shared this recipe with me, but I was forbidden to share it with anyone else during her lifetime. "  Mallery said her grandmother was a superb natural cook. "She judged what she was preparing by deciding if it looked right, felt right, smelled right and so on," she said.
NEWS
Scott Anderson | Culinary Passion | November 21, 2012
This is a very straightforward dressing mix that has avocado blended into the ingredients. It adds a delightful creaminess to the dressing and some healthful fats, as well.  Choose large ripe avocados or your recipe will have issues. Under ripen will be hard and flavorless, while over-ripe fruit avocados will simply mush into the dressing.  If the avocados need to be ripen fast, place into a brown paper bag and close to allow faster ripening. I used a glass pan as my casserole dish, but you can use metal or silicone, if so desired.
NEWS
Scott Anderson | Culinary Passion | March 22, 2012
This recipe is super simple but loaded with flavor. It's so easy to make you can have the kids help you put this recipe together. If you are making this recipe family friendly then I'd suggest going with mild sausage and regular chorizo and adding in your favorite veggie and fruit. This recipe can be made in two ways. The first is to partially cook all the ingredients, then thread onto a wooden skewer, then finish cooking in the oven. The second  is to load the raw ingredients onto the skewers and roast of in a pan in the oven.
LIFESTYLE
December 14, 2011
This recipe for steamed shrimp came from my paternal grandmother, Emma C. Potter Fitz Baker. Emma was born in 1890 and died in 1962, and our family loves her steamed shrimp recipe still today. This recipe can be adjusted for a small dinner or a large gathering. This recipe was created before Old Bay seasoning was in existence. In fact, I think this recipe is better than any Old Bay recipe. - Dawn Fitz Lowenhaupt is a member of the Otterbein United Methodist Church hand bell choir Steamed shrimp For each pound of uncooked shrimp add: 1 heaping tablespoon of salt 1/2 teaspoon ground red pepper 1 teaspoon celery seed 1 tablespoon Worcestershire sauce 2 cans of beer Black pepper Uncooked shrimp Mix together all ingredients except shrimp in a pot. Add shrimp, stir and cover mixture with black pepper.
NEWS
Scott Anderson | Culinary Passion | August 21, 2011
OK, so you are probably wondering why I'm so crabby. Well, it's a delicious protein that is so easy to us. in a variety of ways. I love the flavor, texture, and the way it takes to just about every dish I create. You will have to forgive my lack of style, however, in that I am simply adding ingredients to this dish based upon what I use on the mainland.  I've never been to Hawaii, but if one of my loyal readers ever heads that way and needs a personal chef, give me a call, I'd be glad to taste my way across the Hawaiian Islands with you. - Scott C. Anderson is associate food service director and chef with Shepherd University dining services in Shepherdstown, W.Va., and Chef Ambassador to the Wisconsin Milk Marketing Board.
NEWS
Scott Anderson | Culinary Passion | June 17, 2011
Here is another fun summer recipe that will certainly cool off the most discerning of palates. My wife is not one for fancy soup —  even chilled soup  — but she loves peaches, so this will certainly be a recipe I make again and bring some home for her to try. I'd suggest when possible using fresh peaches that you freeze yourself, but bagged peaches from the grocery store work well in a pinch. You can try substituting watermelon, cantaloupe or nectarines for a different flavor profile.
NEWS
Scott Anderson | Culinary Passion | March 21, 2011
Everybody loves brussels sprouts. Hey, wait a minute, that's me. I love them, and can't get enough of them. Alas, they don't go well with my blood thinners so I can't eat as many as I'd like. From Rachael Ray to "Cook This, Not That" — everyone tries to get the unsuspecting patron to eat these lovely garden gnomes. Yet these poor little sprouts often end up cast aside or tossed to the family dog. So, take this recipe, change it up to make it your own and go out there and bring new life to these miniature cabbages.
NEWS
July 7, 2009
The Herald-Mail would like to publish penny-pinching, tasty recipes by thrifty cooks in the Tri-State area on the Food page every week. Contact staff writer Julie Greene at 301-733-5131 or 800-626-6397, ext. 2320, or
NEWS
By CHINA MILLMAN / Pittsburgh Post-Gazette | May 3, 2009
The arrival of review copies of cookbooks always gives me a little thrill, but ripping open a thick envelope to find "A Homemade Life" was like opening a long-anticipated birthday present. Many people before me have recognized Molly Wizenberg's talent for stringing together words as well as recipes. Her blog, Orangette (orangette.blogspot.com), is one of the most widely acclaimed food blogs on the Web. Since last spring she has had a monthly column in Bon Appetit, and now she has a book, "A Homemade Life: Stories and Recipes From My Kitchen Table" (Simon & Schuster, 2009)
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