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Black History Month

NEWS
February 9, 2008
Trainfest The Hagerstown Model Railroad Museum will host a train show and exhibits regarding railroading and model railroading. Today, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Washington County Agricultural Education Center, 7313 Sharpsburg Pike, south of Hagerstown. $3; free for those younger than 12. Winter festival The Hancock Winter Festival will feature ice blocks for ice-carving competitions and a silent auction of special items and gifts donated by area merchants. A hat contest will be sponsored by the Interfaith Service Coalition.
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NEWS
February 5, 2008
To commemorate Black History Month, the Hagerstown YMCA Black Achievers will host a Black History Program at the Hagerstown YMCA on Feb. 18, beginning at 11:30 a.m. The guest speaker will be James Smith of Baltimore, who is the assistant secretary of residential services for the Department of Juvenile Services. The event will include dance performances and music (solos) by students and members of the local community. It will also include the renowned rendition of Rev. Martin Luther King Jr.'s "I Have a Dream" speech by Pastor Darin Mency.
NEWS
March 16, 2007
Young people were exposed to new perspectives on black history during a series of Black History Month programs sponsored in February by Contemporary School for the Arts & Gallery Inc. In addition to programs at several Washington County public schools, the presentations were expanded this year to community centers at Noland Village, Frederick Street, the Memorial Recreation Center and Elgin Station, as well as at the gallery. Dwain Esmond noted that Black History Month is usually a time when the late Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. and other black luminaries are celebrated for their historic nonviolent efforts on behalf of civil rights for all people.
NEWS
February 28, 2007
The No Smoking Youth Club took a tour of the Doleman Black Heritage Museum for their outing during Black History Month. Charles "Sonny" Doleman gave the group an energetic tour that included historical items ranging from World War II memorabilia to black hair-care products from the 1800s. The youth club learned a lot about black history, starting with a story of segregation in colleges. Blacks in Washington County, who wanted to attend college in the early 1900s, attended college in West Virginia due to segregation.
NEWS
by TIFFANY ARNOLD | February 22, 2007
SHEPHERDSTOWN, W.Va. - You've gotta have a little bit of that funk if you're going to back up "the Godfather of Soul," James Brown. The all-female doo-wop trio The Jewels has a little funk. The Jewels were part of the James Brown Revue in the 1960s and spent a year touring with Brown as his backup singers. "We're not your typical girls' group," said Jewels member Grace Ruffin. "We're not The Supremes. We just don't stand back and sing, little soft music. " The Jewels will perform their brand of doo-wop today in Shepherdstown, as part of a Black History Month ceremony at the Clarion Hotel & Conference Center of Historic Shepherdstown.
NEWS
by KAREN HANNA | February 27, 2006
karenh@herald-mail.com HAGERSTOWN - In its day, the debate over sending freed black slaves to Africa was as heated as some of the most pressing concerns of the 21st century. Two centuries since the back-to-Africa movement gained steam, descendants of those decisions are now trying to overcome decades of civil war and unrest. For blacks living under the crushing racism of 19th-century America, professor Debra Newman Ham said, the offer of settling elsewhere was no easy sell.
NEWS
By MARIE GILBERT | February 26, 2006
marieg@herald-mail.com As a young man, Ron Lytle always wanted to know where he fit in. "I was an athlete, but I knew I wasn't going to be a professional boxer or baseball player," Lytle said. "People told me I was too small. But I always thought big. And whatever I grew up to be, I knew I wanted to make a difference. " Today, Lytle is well on his way to achieving that goal. As founder of the Contemporary School of the Arts and Gallery in downtown Hagerstown, Lytle offers programs that enhance the artistic abilities of young people, provides a venue for area artists to display their work and educates the community about the African-American culture.
NEWS
by KAREN HANNA | February 21, 2006
HAGERSTOWN karenh@herald-mail.com During a morning of solo performances and remarks, YMCA program director Joseph Summers had a message for an audience gathered to commemorate Black History Month. "It's not about me," said Summers, who has worked with the Black Achievers program at Camp Curtin YMCA in Harrisburg, Pa. About 150 people, including a large contingent of small children in the YMCA's day-care program, gathered Monday in an aerobics classroom at Hagerstown YMCA to hear keynote speaker Summers and numerous musical performances.
NEWS
By Tiffany Arnold | February 19, 2006
Those who have no record of what their forebears have accomplished lose the inspiration which comes from the teaching of biography and history. - Carter G. Woodson tiffanya@herald-mail.com WASHINGTON COUNTY - Historian and author Carter G. Woodson, known as the Father of Black History, might have started the effort to preserve local black history when, in 1920, he recorded the names and addresses of freed blacks living in the area before the Civil War. Woodson included Washington County and Hagerstown in his book "Free Negro Heads of Families in the United States in 1830.
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