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NEWS
April 13, 2010
After donating blood, HCC student Jessica Preston picks up a book containing the works of Edgar Allan Poe as part of the Big Read Big Bleed program Tuesday in the college's Student Center. The Big Read Big Bleed was sponsored by the Community Foundation of Washington County and HCC's Student Government Association in conjunction with the third annual Big Read. During the event, those who donated blood to the American Red Cross received books containing Poe's writings.
NEWS
By KATE COLEMAN | May 1, 2010
I love to read. I started a March 2007 column with that same sentence. Then I wrote about author Helene Hanff, whose books I'd enjoyed so much I had to let people know. I still love to read, but the works of Edgar Allan Poe - many of which were assigned and dutifully read when I was in high school - are not writings I've ever returned to. I acknowledge his lasting influence, but he's just not my cup of tea. I recently saw the old gloom-and-doom-dark-and-dreary scribe in a brighter light.
NEWS
September 20, 2007
A monthlong celebration to promote reading kicks off Sunday at 5 p.m. at The Maryland Theatre. Washington County is one of 117 communities nationwide promoting reading and literary awareness among reluctant readers and nonreaders through The Big Read program, according to the Community Foundation of Washington County, one of the program sponsors. Sunday marks the beginning of a celebration of author Harper Lee's novel "To Kill a Mockingbird. " The film version of the novel will be shown at The Maryland Theatre.
NEWS
July 7, 2007
The Community Foundation of Washington County MD Inc. will be sponsoring a nationwide reading program called The Big Read, an initiative of the National Endowment for the Arts (NEA) and the Institute of Museum and Library Services. Studies have shown that literary reading is rapidly declining among American adults, especially the younger age groups. Studies also show that literary readers are more likely to perform volunteer and charity work than are nonliterary readers. Through a competitive application process, the NEA has chosen 117 communities across the country to participate in the Big Read, which gives these communities the opportunity to promote, read, and discuss a single literary classic.
NEWS
July 4, 2009
The Community Foundation of Washington County has been chosen by the National Endowment for the Arts to bring a third Big Read to Washington County. In April 2010, the county will host a month-long celebration of the works of Edgar Allen Poe, whose ties to Maryland made his writings a natural choice. In previous Big Reads, the event has featured "To Kill a Mockingbird" by Harper Lee and F. Scott Fitzgerald's "The Great Gatsby. " Preliminary program planning is under way. For more information, contact Kristy Smith, program manager, Community Foundation of Washington County, at 301-745-5210.
NEWS
By Heather Keels | November 30, 1999
HAGERSTOWN The thing about mockingbirds, Niki Perini says, is that they don't just mimic other birds' songs. They take bits and pieces of what they've experienced and weave them together into something new. In a way, it's not very different from what author Harper Lee did as she crafted her Pulitzer Prize-winning novel, "To Kill a Mockingbird," from her own memories of growing up in a rural Alabama town, said Perini, the artistic director of...
NEWS
By MARLO BARNHART | July 2, 2007
BOONSBORO - Come September, residents of Washington County will have a unique opportunity to come together to read and appreciate and discuss the impact Harper Lee's best-seller "To Kill A Mockingbird" had on their lives. A series of events focusing on this literary epic has been made possible by a grant from the National Endowment for the Arts, according to Kristy L. Smith, program assistant at the Community Foundation of Washington County. "We are one of 117 communities in the country to get a grant for this NEA program called Big Read," Smith said.
NEWS
By HEATHER KEELS | September 24, 2007
HAGERSTOWN - "If you don't hush, I'll knock you bowlegged!" 11-year-old Johnna Stoup shouted from The Maryland Theatre's stage. In her red plaid shirt and denim overalls, she looked just like Scout, the tomboy protagonist in the film version of "To Kill a Mockingbird," the movie she was helping introduce. But Johnna was actually playing Nelle Harper Lee, the author of the book that inspired the movie. Until Sunday evening, Johnna said, she actually hadn't seen the 1962 film - but she's reading the book.
NEWS
April 8, 2009
On March 25, the Community Foundation of Washington County Inc. launched a project aimed at getting a few thousand county residents - both young people and adults - to read a book. And not just any book, but F. Scott Fitzgerald's classic, "The Great Gatsby. " Though written in the 1920s, the book is relevant to our times because, according to Barnes & Noble's "SparkNotes" Web site, "Gatsby" deals in large part with the transformation of the American dream "into the mere pursuit of wealth.
NEWS
January 15, 2009
MARTINSBURG, W.Va. -- Eleanor Clift, a contributing editor of Newsweek and regular panelist on the television show "The McLaughlin Report," is expected to join several authors for the third West Virginia Book Faire at "Olde Town" Martinsburg in April, Martinsburg-Berkeley County Public Library officials said Thursday. Slated for April 17 and 18 in downtown Martinsburg, the fair's featured authors for discussions, workshops and other activities also include Harlan Coben, Lisa Scottoline, Debby Applegate, Craig McDonald, Sarah Sullivan and Kevin Sherry.
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NEWS
By ROXANN MILLER | roxann.miller@herald-mail.com | June 10, 2012
School is out for the summer, but that doesn't mean it's time to take a vacation from reading. To keep the pages turning this summer, libraries in Franklin County have compiled a list of free, fun-filled reading activities. The theme for this summer's reading adventure is “Dream Big, Read!” Registration began June 4, but children still can sign up for the summer reading program at the county's libraries. Children ages 12 and younger can attend programs, and earn prizes and awards by reading books or having books read to them.
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NEWS
By KATE COLEMAN | May 1, 2010
I love to read. I started a March 2007 column with that same sentence. Then I wrote about author Helene Hanff, whose books I'd enjoyed so much I had to let people know. I still love to read, but the works of Edgar Allan Poe - many of which were assigned and dutifully read when I was in high school - are not writings I've ever returned to. I acknowledge his lasting influence, but he's just not my cup of tea. I recently saw the old gloom-and-doom-dark-and-dreary scribe in a brighter light.
NEWS
By JULIE E. GREENE | April 25, 2010
HAGERSTOWN -- Imagine a tale weaving Edgar Allan Poe's "The Raven," "The Tell-Tale Heart," "The Pit and the Pendulum" and "The Cask of Amontillado. " That's what Springfield Middle School eighth-grader Toby Frevert did and put it to paper. "I like Edgar Allan Poe and a bunch of his stories had missing ends. I'm kind of merging a bunch of stories together," Toby said. Toby's story, "The Fates of Fortunato and Montresor," won first place in the eighth-grade category of the Poe-inspired writing competition.
NEWS
April 13, 2010
After donating blood, HCC student Jessica Preston picks up a book containing the works of Edgar Allan Poe as part of the Big Read Big Bleed program Tuesday in the college's Student Center. The Big Read Big Bleed was sponsored by the Community Foundation of Washington County and HCC's Student Government Association in conjunction with the third annual Big Read. During the event, those who donated blood to the American Red Cross received books containing Poe's writings.
NEWS
April 8, 2010
The question posted Monday on The Herald-Mail's Web site was: Have you ever read anything by Edgar Allan Poe, whose works are the subject of this year's Big Read? Poll results: Yes: 541 votes (74 percent) No: 194 votes (26 percent) "I read his 'poetry' when I was graded on it in high school. His writings are pretty dark. " --- "I have read most of his writings, from 'The Tell-Tale Heart" to 'The Raven.' ... I believe many of his writings have prompted much of the science fiction stories of the day. He used animals like the black cat and raven, which symbolized fear from the Dark Ages of witchcraft beliefs, to keep the readers on the edge of their seats.
NEWS
July 4, 2009
The Community Foundation of Washington County has been chosen by the National Endowment for the Arts to bring a third Big Read to Washington County. In April 2010, the county will host a month-long celebration of the works of Edgar Allen Poe, whose ties to Maryland made his writings a natural choice. In previous Big Reads, the event has featured "To Kill a Mockingbird" by Harper Lee and F. Scott Fitzgerald's "The Great Gatsby. " Preliminary program planning is under way. For more information, contact Kristy Smith, program manager, Community Foundation of Washington County, at 301-745-5210.
NEWS
April 17, 2009
Big Read, Read Out Featuring "The Great Gatsby. " Get a free copy of the book while supplies last, and enjoy period music, dancing and refreshments. Today, 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. University Plaza, downtown Hagerstown. In case of rain, the event will be in the atrium at University System of Maryland, Hagerstown. Contact Community Foundation of Washington County MD Inc. at 301-745-5210 or cfwc@cfwcmd.org . Book signing BOONSBORO -- Book signings with Nora Roberts, P&C and Kristin Cast, Susan Donovan, Mary Blayney, Darlene Gardner, Donna Kauffman, Sally MacKenzie, Michelle Monkou, Sophia Nash, Carla Neggers, Kathleen Gilles Seidel, Sarah Wendell, Michelle Willingham and Rebecca York.
NEWS
April 8, 2009
On March 25, the Community Foundation of Washington County Inc. launched a project aimed at getting a few thousand county residents - both young people and adults - to read a book. And not just any book, but F. Scott Fitzgerald's classic, "The Great Gatsby. " Though written in the 1920s, the book is relevant to our times because, according to Barnes & Noble's "SparkNotes" Web site, "Gatsby" deals in large part with the transformation of the American dream "into the mere pursuit of wealth.
NEWS
April 8, 2009
All downtown employees are invited to attend a celebration of "The Great Gatsby" in conjunction with The Big Read, an initiative of the National Endowment for the Arts. The Big Read is scheduled for Friday, April 17, from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. at University Plaza in downtown Hagerstown. In case of rain, the event will be moved inside the atrium at USM-H. Free copies of "The Great Gatsby" will be available while supplies last. The event will include period music, dancing and refreshments courtesy of the Community Foundation of Washington County MD Inc. For more information, call 301-745-5210, or e-mail cfwc@cfwcmd.
NEWS
January 15, 2009
MARTINSBURG, W.Va. -- Eleanor Clift, a contributing editor of Newsweek and regular panelist on the television show "The McLaughlin Report," is expected to join several authors for the third West Virginia Book Faire at "Olde Town" Martinsburg in April, Martinsburg-Berkeley County Public Library officials said Thursday. Slated for April 17 and 18 in downtown Martinsburg, the fair's featured authors for discussions, workshops and other activities also include Harlan Coben, Lisa Scottoline, Debby Applegate, Craig McDonald, Sarah Sullivan and Kevin Sherry.
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