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Beth

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OPINION
July 13, 2011
When last we spoke of this issue, Beth had just introduced herself to four lovely kittens that were the byproduct of a one-night yowl between two neighborhood strays. The Tom was never seen again, but the mom decided to make herself at home with us. It took a while to get these sweet, lovely kittens to come out from under our office building, but they finally did, thanks to Beth's repeated overtures and an estimated 3.2 million cans of cat food. These smart, sweet, lovely kittens got the picture soon enough, although they were still reluctant to interact.
OPINION
June 11, 2012
I'm not one for making broad generalizations, but when you hear the words “tumor” and “spine” in the same sentence, you are disinclined to set off fireworks. Yet that's what we heard as we drove through the Catoctin Mountains this spring, Beth on the cellphone with her physician, who was poring over the results of an MRI. (To save you the suspense, this story appears to be heading toward a happy ending.) Beth had been battling some intense pain, the type normally associated with watching a presidential debate, over the past year, chalking it up to an unruly sciatic nerve.
OPINION
By TIM ROWLAND | timr@herald-mail.com | September 12, 2012
The genius of the male race, I think, is that there is no middle ground. When you're in a tight place, call in a guy and the situation will either be solved in its entirety or it will become much worse. If Beth wasn't aware of this before Tuesday, she is now. It all started with a freak flood that occurred in a small, mountain community that swamped the downtown and eroded ground in some areas that could be seen and in some areas that could not. For example, a stream carved out a channel of soil beneath the pavement of a local parking lot, destabilizing the parking space closest to the stream bank without giving any visible sign that anything was amiss.
OPINION
June 15, 2011
I belong to that school of people who respond to weird engine noises by turning up the radio. So when my office started making weird noises I cranked the iTunes. This couldn’t be good. It had been so long since Beth’s unsuccessful foray underneath the trailer in search of newborn kittens, I was starting to believe in my own magical thinking that the kittens did not exist, or had been eaten by snakes soon after their birth. We had a stray momma cat now named Geena on our hands, no question, but (thump)
NEWS
December 10, 2012
Beth always says it's a good thing she didn't have children given the inordinate amount of attention she showers on mere animals. My idea is that the animals are often more worthy of care, but that is another matter. So when the SUV she calls Big Red was in the middle of tipping over on a steep hill last week, her first thought was not for her own health and safety, but for her dogs, which were on the way to the groomer's. The bouvier de Flanders named Opie, as has been documented in past columns, has a soulful howl/moan (Opie's Opera, they call it at the vet's)
OPINION
By TIM ROWLAND | September 12, 2011
“Oh” is such an innocent-sounding word. Used in casual indifference, mainly, it's the verbal equal to the ellipse. Except at Little Farm by the Creek, where “Oh,” as it is generally exclaimed by Beth, is an indicator that the world as I know it is about to cave in. “Oh” can mean anything from the water softener sheared a line and the basement is full of water to three pistons just fell out the bottom of the pickup tuck. So when Beth took two steps out of the office last week, gave a little start and said “Oh,” I sensed trouble.
OPINION
By TIM ROWLAND | timr@herald-mail.com | December 11, 2012
Beth always says it's a good thing she didn't have children given the inordinate amount of attention she showers on mere animals. My idea is that the animals are often more worthy of care, but that is another matter. So when the SUV she calls Big Red was in the middle of tipping over on a steep hill last week, her first thought was not for her own health and safety, but for her dogs, which were on the way to the groomer's. The bouvier de Flanders named Opie, as has been documented in past columns, has a soulful howl/moan (Opie's Opera, they call it at the vet's)
OPINION
May 16, 2012
Beth says that all animals are Republicans because they hate change. They are wonderful, charming and warm until you try to alter the way things have always been done, at which point they become frightened, snarling monsters who likely as not will get right in your face and threaten to stampede you if you so much as suggest a single-payer health system. But our cattle and donkeys were in for a major change Tuesday when they had to be moved to a new home - forget that they are going from a rather rocky hillside to a broad, lush river bottom surrounded by green, West Virginia mountains.
OPINION
June 12, 2013
Real Men are fascinating. We will throw our own children up in the air, spin them 'round and 'round by the wrists like a carnival ride and dangle them off of second-story balconies - yet we will not get within 10 feet of the satellite dish with the riding lawnmower. Too much bad stuff could happen. Kids are resilient, whereas one little bump of the dish could unleash terrors best not contemplated, especially on a ball night. So it is with this in mind that I salute the Real Men who were comfortable enough with their manhood to be seen over the weekend at the Maryland Poultry Swap in Sharpsburg.
OPINION
June 6, 2012
For years, I have worked my way through the “seven stages of yard sale:” Shock, pain, anger, depression, etc., and finally reluctant acceptance. I keep my distance, avert my eyes when I see one and more or less try to pretend they don't exist. The reasons are deep and complex. Some are practical; I cannot count the number of times I have almost slammed into the rear of a vehicle that, with no warning, came to a dead stop in the middle of a busy highway, its occupants staring at a spread of junk, trying to decide if it was worth pulling over.
ARTICLES BY DATE
OPINION
June 12, 2013
Real Men are fascinating. We will throw our own children up in the air, spin them 'round and 'round by the wrists like a carnival ride and dangle them off of second-story balconies - yet we will not get within 10 feet of the satellite dish with the riding lawnmower. Too much bad stuff could happen. Kids are resilient, whereas one little bump of the dish could unleash terrors best not contemplated, especially on a ball night. So it is with this in mind that I salute the Real Men who were comfortable enough with their manhood to be seen over the weekend at the Maryland Poultry Swap in Sharpsburg.
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OBITUARIES
May 28, 2013
Judye Beth Estes, 68, of Hagerstown, died Monday, May 20, 2013, at Meritus Medical Center. There will be no viewing. A memorial service will be Saturday at 5 p.m. at Willow Brook Seventh-day Adventist Church, Boonsboro. Pastor Tim Crosby will officiate. Burial will be at the convenience of the family. Arrangements are by Minnich Funeral Home, 415 E. Wilson Blvd., Hagerstown.
OPINION
By TIM ROWLAND | timr@herald-mail.com | December 11, 2012
Beth always says it's a good thing she didn't have children given the inordinate amount of attention she showers on mere animals. My idea is that the animals are often more worthy of care, but that is another matter. So when the SUV she calls Big Red was in the middle of tipping over on a steep hill last week, her first thought was not for her own health and safety, but for her dogs, which were on the way to the groomer's. The bouvier de Flanders named Opie, as has been documented in past columns, has a soulful howl/moan (Opie's Opera, they call it at the vet's)
NEWS
December 10, 2012
Beth always says it's a good thing she didn't have children given the inordinate amount of attention she showers on mere animals. My idea is that the animals are often more worthy of care, but that is another matter. So when the SUV she calls Big Red was in the middle of tipping over on a steep hill last week, her first thought was not for her own health and safety, but for her dogs, which were on the way to the groomer's. The bouvier de Flanders named Opie, as has been documented in past columns, has a soulful howl/moan (Opie's Opera, they call it at the vet's)
OPINION
By TIM ROWLAND | timr@herald-mail.com | September 12, 2012
The genius of the male race, I think, is that there is no middle ground. When you're in a tight place, call in a guy and the situation will either be solved in its entirety or it will become much worse. If Beth wasn't aware of this before Tuesday, she is now. It all started with a freak flood that occurred in a small, mountain community that swamped the downtown and eroded ground in some areas that could be seen and in some areas that could not. For example, a stream carved out a channel of soil beneath the pavement of a local parking lot, destabilizing the parking space closest to the stream bank without giving any visible sign that anything was amiss.
OBITUARIES
September 4, 2012
Beth A. Murray, 44, born April 8, 1968, in Hagerstown, Md., to Phyllis and Robert Murray Sr., passed to eternal peace on Aug. 29, 2012. She was a resident of Rehoboth, Del., for the last five years. Besides her parents, she is survived by daughter, Amanda Miller; granddaughter, Ryleigh, of Rehoboth; daughter, Christine Miller, and grandson, Brycen, of Martinsburg, W.Va.; brother, Robert Murray Jr. and wife, Signe, of Rehoboth; and sister, Donna Swartz, and George, of Marrow, Ohio.
OPINION
June 11, 2012
I'm not one for making broad generalizations, but when you hear the words “tumor” and “spine” in the same sentence, you are disinclined to set off fireworks. Yet that's what we heard as we drove through the Catoctin Mountains this spring, Beth on the cellphone with her physician, who was poring over the results of an MRI. (To save you the suspense, this story appears to be heading toward a happy ending.) Beth had been battling some intense pain, the type normally associated with watching a presidential debate, over the past year, chalking it up to an unruly sciatic nerve.
OPINION
June 6, 2012
For years, I have worked my way through the “seven stages of yard sale:” Shock, pain, anger, depression, etc., and finally reluctant acceptance. I keep my distance, avert my eyes when I see one and more or less try to pretend they don't exist. The reasons are deep and complex. Some are practical; I cannot count the number of times I have almost slammed into the rear of a vehicle that, with no warning, came to a dead stop in the middle of a busy highway, its occupants staring at a spread of junk, trying to decide if it was worth pulling over.
OPINION
May 16, 2012
Beth says that all animals are Republicans because they hate change. They are wonderful, charming and warm until you try to alter the way things have always been done, at which point they become frightened, snarling monsters who likely as not will get right in your face and threaten to stampede you if you so much as suggest a single-payer health system. But our cattle and donkeys were in for a major change Tuesday when they had to be moved to a new home - forget that they are going from a rather rocky hillside to a broad, lush river bottom surrounded by green, West Virginia mountains.
NEWS
By MATTHEW UMSTEAD | matthew.umstead@herald-mail.com | February 23, 2012
A Hagerstown man accused of fleeing the scene of a fatal motorcycle crash in April 2011 was indicted on three felony charges Thursday by a Berkeley County grand jury. Steven Edward Thompson, 45, of 12202 Cedar Crest Ave., is charged with driving under the influence resulting in death, leaving the scene of an accident resulting in death and leaving the scene of an accident involving an unattended vehicle, according to Berkeley County Prosecuting Attorney Pamela Games-Neely's office.
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