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Behavior

NEWS
January 16, 2001
Letters to the Editor 1/17 Worms aren't always for early birds To the editor: I would like to steal a line from Kathleen Parker and reiterate "We seem to have reached a point where common sense can't be applied and draconian responses are the norm rather than the exception. " When I read the article about the elementary principal who wants a no-tolerance policy on children getting to school late or leaving early, it made me glad I live in Frederick County, Maryland where office administrators have an adequate system to keep up with comings (late arrivals)
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NEWS
By James Dobson | August 21, 1997
Question: My 4-year-old has recently "discovered" his penis and seems rather preoccupied with it. Do you think it's unusual or sinful for him to fondle himself so much? Dr. Dobson: The answer to both of your questions is an emphatic "No!" Unintentional (or even intentional) self-arousal in young children, specifically boys, is neither unusual nor sinful. Your little guy is simply showing that he is "properly wired. " There are no long-term consequences to this kind of innocent childish behavior, and it soon will resolve itself.
NEWS
November 16, 2007
Williamsport's welfare is the task at hand To the editor: Often, in the course of his official duties, an elected official must tolerate a great deal of unpleasantness: Snubs, insults and even threats from folks who disagree with a vote or a position. I know because as a Williamsport Town Council member, I have been on the receiving end of such behavior. I also know it comes with the job. Something else comes with the job as well and that is a duty to represent the people who elected me. I have a duty to spend their money wisely, to gather information and broadcast it to them and to ask questions and state the facts that are important to our town, even when other elected officials might find that behavior offensive.
NEWS
By KATE COLEMAN | April 14, 2000
See also : Austism traits & resources Autism is a puzzle. "Everything's like a piece," said Tammie Bannon, whose 8-year-old son Mark has autism. The pieces are different for every person with autism, and the pieces are hard to find. cont. from lifestyle Autism is a complex developmental disability that typically appears during the first three years of life, according to the Autism Society of America. A brain disorder, it affects a child's ability to communicate, form relationships and respond appropriately to the environment, according to the National Institute of Mental Health.
NEWS
By SAM McMANIS / Sacramento Bee | December 22, 2008
Lunch rush was over, but distractions remained numerous inside the cafe just off a highway in Auburn, Calif. Blenders whirred out smoothies every few minutes, laughter erupted from a nearby group, a young worker noisily cleared tables. Yet, through it all, Cass Brown Capel stayed focused -- eyes locked on her interviewer, the need to interject random thoughts stifled, attention not straying to her daughter, Ariana, who was sitting placidly next to her. You would have no inkling that Capel, a 54-year-old psychologist from Auburn, has been diagnosed with the adult version of attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder since 1991.
NEWS
by KEVIN CLAPP | August 26, 2002
kevinc@herald-mail.com Twice a year Sherry Mohar backs onto a scale. This small step is required for the Hagerstown woman to move forward. Taken for granted by many, the dial's reading is like a lit match dangling perilously close to a fuse for the 36-year-old customer service representative. "It's probably best that I don't know," she says. "Because if I found out I weigh more than I think I might, it might be too easy to cut back. " The number in her mind may be 120; could be more, could be less.
NEWS
By CHRIS COPLEY | April 27, 2009
Author and TV news guest Joe Piscatella has spent a lifetime talking to Americans about making good healthy choices. But he's not very optimistic. Americans eat too much. They work and play while sitting still. They smoke. We know these are not good for health, but we do them anyway. "Frankly, we know a lot about (health)," Piscatella said. "The question today is, if we know so much, ... why don't we change our behavior?" His conclusion: People coast until they hit a personal crisis.
NEWS
October 13, 2005
At first glance, the idea of using mathematics to explain human behavior would seem to have limited applications. Yes, most people would agree to work harder if there were more money involved. But aside from that, the reasons people do things often seem to have little to do with logic, let alone arithmetic. Apparently we are wrong, or at least uninformed. For years, a branch of mathematics called game theory has been used to analyze how humans behave when dealing with others.
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