Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: HeraldMail HomeCollectionsBattlefield
IN THE NEWS

Battlefield

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By ANDREW SCHOTZ | andrews@herald-mail.com | November 22, 2011
U.S. Rep. Roscoe G. Bartlett received a surprise Tuesday as he entered the Dual Highway building where his Hagerstown office is located. Bartlett, R-Md., learned that he had been named the new lifetime honorary chairman of the Antietam National Battlefield Memorial Illumination. Each year, 23,110 luminaria are placed along the battlefield near Sharpsburg to represent each casualty during the Battle of Antietam in the Civil War. Bartlett said he likes the new title, which carries no duties, because he greatly appreciates the event.
NEWS
September 3, 2010
TriState Astronomers will meet at Antietam National Battlefield's Visitors Center on Saturday, Sept. 18, from 7 to 11 p.m. to observe the moon on International Observe the Moon Night. Multiple telescopes will be set up, but feel free to bring your own binoculars. International Observe the Moon Night is an outreach event dedicated to engaging the lunar science and education community, amateur astronomers, space enthusiasts and the public in annual lunar observation campaigns that share the excitement of lunar science and exploration.
NEWS
August 14, 1997
SHARPSBURG - Antietam National Battlefield Visitors' Center will be open 8:30 a.m. to 7 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 11, through Thursday, Sept. 18. The center will be open 8:30 a.m. to 6 p.m. Friday, Sept. 19, through Sunday, Sept. 21. There is a $2 per person or $4 per family fee to enter the park. All programs are tentative. For information, call 301- 432-5124. Thursday, Sept. 11, and Friday, Sept. 12 Interpretive programs throughout the day. Friday 9 to 11:30 p.m. - barn dance, with music by the Wildcat Regiment Band, Piper Farm Saturday, Sept.
LIFESTYLE
September 17, 2012
The Eagles Club Inc. of Waynesboro donated $2,500 to Battle of Monterey Pass battlefield preservation efforts. With Blue Ridge Summit, Pa., land acquired to open an interpretive center, officials are now looking to add a parking lot, create informational signs, replace a roof and possibly purchase additional land.
NEWS
By LAURA ERNDE | May 18, 2000
ANNAPOLIS - Wearing a Union infantry uniform identical to one worn at the 1862 Battle of South Mountain, Al Preston watched another historic event take place Thursday. cont. from front page Gov. Parris Glendening signed a law establishing South Mountain as Maryland's first state battlefield. "I'm just proud to be here. Wild horses couldn't keep me away," said Preston, assistant manager of the South Mountain Recreation Area, which includes part of the battlefield.
NEWS
BY ANDREW SCHOTZ | February 27, 2002
Harpers Ferry, W.Va. - The Harpers Ferry Civil War battlefield is one of the 10 most endangered in the nation, according to a watchdog group's list released Tuesday. The Civil War Preservation Trust named battlefields in Harpers Ferry, Gettysburg, Pa., and six other states as the most threatened by development. The Trust also named 15 other battlefields as "at-risk," one step below the top 10. None of the other 15 are in the Tri-State region. The Trust, a nonprofit battlefield preservation organization, said that 2,729 of the 7,199 acres in the Harpers Ferry battlefield area are protected.
NEWS
by LAURA ERNDE | September 18, 2003
The historic Burnside Bridge is in danger of being damaged by Hurricane Isabel, Antietam National Battlefield Superintendent John W. Howard said Wednesday. "That's our Number 1 concern right now," he said. Built in 1832, the three-arch stone bridge could be under a lot of pressure from rising waters and debris floating down Antietam Creek, he said. After a thunderstorm about two weeks ago, a hole developed in one of the bridge's side walls, he said. Because of the storm, the entire park will be closed Friday.
NEWS
March 24, 2008
The Hagerstown Civil War Roundtable will meet Thursday, March 27, at the Four Points Sheraton on Dual Highway in Hagerstown. Edwin Bearss, historian emeritus, U.S National Park Service will speak on "Five Forks to Appomattox - The Last Days of the Confederacy. " Reservations are required. Dinner is at 6:45 p.m. Tickets cost $19 and can be paid at the door or attend only the talk at no charge. The talk begins at 7:45 p.m. For reservations or questions, call Justin Mayhue at 301-331-2449.
NEWS
November 22, 2008
SHARPSBURG - Antietam National Cemetery will be closed temporarily while a flagpole near the cemetery entrance is replaced, according to a press release from Antietam National Battlefield Superintendent John W. Howard. The closure will begin Monday, and the cemetery will reopen as soon as the 85-foot flagpole is installed, Howard said. The existing flagpole was damaged during a storm on June 4. For information, call the battlefield at 301-432-7648 or 301-432-5124.
ARTICLES BY DATE
LIFESTYLE
September 6, 2013
The Antietam National Battlefield will present a series of programs to commemorate the 151st anniversary of the Battle of Antietam.  Fought on Sept. 17, 1862, Union and Confederate Armies clashed for 12 hours over the rolling fields outside of Sharpsburg. When the sun set, more than 23,000 soldiers who had been killed or wounded or missing in what is considered the bloodiest one-day battle in American history.  The Antietam National Battlefield is a member of the Hagerstown-Washington County Convention and Visitors Bureau.
Advertisement
NEWS
By JENNIFER FITCH | waynesboro@herald-mail.com | July 31, 2013
The Friends of Monterey Pass Battlefield Inc. and Washington Township (Pa.) Supervisors are working on a lease agreement for the Civil War battlefield land where an interpretive center will be built. The municipality owns the property off Pa. 16 in Blue Ridge Summit, Pa. Site work is under way leading to construction of the 38-foot by 28-foot visitors center there. Drafts of the lease agreement call for the Friends of Monterey Pass Battlefield Inc. to pay the township $1 a year for the first 20 years, followed by extensions after that.
NEWS
By MATTHEW UMSTEAD | matthew.umstead@herald-mail.com | July 6, 2013
Deep green fields of soybeans flanked a crowd of thousands who gathered Saturday at Antietam National Battlefield for the 28th Salute to Independence. In between, green, blue, brown and other colorful blocks of plastic tarp and blankets covered the mowed grassy field where spectators waited to see the Maryland Symphony Orchestra's performance and fireworks that followed. Tents and beach umbrellas shielded them and their games of Uno, Go Fish and Dutch Blitz in the hours before the orchestra's salute, which began with the national anthem, “Maryland, My Maryland” and the Armed Forces Salute under the direction of Elizabeth Schulze.
NEWS
By JENNIFER FITCH | waynesboro@herald-mail.com | July 3, 2013
For 10 years, Ray Lizarraga displayed in his home a Confederate-style kepi that he obtained when he first started participating in Civil War re-enactments. He placed it on the head of an 11-year-old stranger Wednesday during a commemorative march on the 150th anniversary of Pickett's Charge. “I just wanted to have it here as a peace offering,” Lizarraga said of the hat. Eric Jackson of North Carolina grinned as he donned the kepi. He and his 13-year-old brother, Drew Jackson, walked a mile with thousands of other people on the same ground crossed by Confederate soldiers on the Battle of Gettysburg's last day. The crowd made its way up Cemetery Ridge to the so-called “high-water mark” reached by the Confederacy.
NEWS
By JENNIFER FITCH | waynesboro@herald-mail.com | June 30, 2013
Gettysburg resident Daniel Lady left his farm July 1, 1863, and found a gruesome scene when he returned a few days later. The property on modern-day Hanover Road had become the only Confederate field hospital north of the Mason-Dixon Line. Surgeons threw body parts out Lady's parlor windows, and wounded men continued to seek shelter in his barn after the troops left. “They found dead soldiers that he and his 11-year-old son had to bury,” said Barb Mowery, president of the Gettysburg Battlefield Preservation Association, which took ownership of the farm in 1999.
NEWS
By JENNIFER FITCH | waynesboro@herald-mail.com | June 9, 2013
The compass, measuring chain and hand-drawn map displayed by Bob Angle and Wayne Twigg during a Gettysburg (Pa.) Festival Fringe Event on Sunday bore little resemblance to the tools the men use in their daily work as surveyors. In fact, when volunteer surveyors with the Mason & Dixon Line Preservation Partnership set out in recent years to locate stones placed by Charles Mason and Jeremiah Dixon in the 1760s, they used GPS technology to document what they found. Still, the more primitive tools used for five years in the 18th century established the boundary between Maryland and Pennsylvania that put an end to land skirmishes.
NEWS
By JENNIFER FITCH | waynesboro@herald-mail.com | June 9, 2013
Will Manning knew nothing of the Battle of Monterey Pass before he started his Eagle Scout project, but 80 hours of work on an informational sign for the battlefield filled in the blanks. Will, 15, built a wooden sign with informative text and images to help visitors understand what happened during the mountaintop Civil War battle. The 4-by-8-foot sign at Monterey Pass Battlefield Park off Pa. 16 in Blue Ridge Summit describes what happened there on the night of July 4, 1863. Last week, Will joined his father, John, and Washington Township, Pa., officials in commemorating his contribution to the municipal-owned battlefield park.
NEWS
June 3, 2013
Monocacy National Battlefield will host a regular schedule of free summer ranger programs. On weekdays at 11 a.m. and 2 p.m., National Park Service rangers will present “Race to Washington,” an orientation to the Battle of Monocacy. On Saturday and Sunday, the battlefield orientation will be presented at 3 p.m., with additional programs covering a variety of subjects offered at 11 a.m. and 1 p.m. The 11 a.m. programs will focus on the history of the Baltimore & Ohio Railroad Junction through stories about the Civil War, civilian life at that time, and the experiences of free and enslaved blacks.
NEWS
By MATTHEW UMSTEAD | matthewu@herald-mail.com | May 1, 2013
Marcy Fleeharty had no idea her great aunt had multiple sclerosis until only days before Saturday's Walk MS Hagerstown at Antietam National Battlefield. Fleeharty, of Berkeley Springs, W.Va., said she already had decided to take part in Saturday's walk for her friend's mother, who was diagnosed with the chronic, often disabling disease. “Two days ago, talking to my mother, I found out my grandmother's sister had MS. I had no clue,” Fleeharty said. “The fact that the walks are designed to bring awareness works,” Fleeharty said as she and her friend, Lindsay Unger, finished the last several yards of the walk.
NEWS
By HOLLY SHOK | holly.shok@herald-mail.com | April 20, 2013
A boom bellowed and black smoke poured from the barrel's mouth, but the caliber of sound the cannon made was only narrowly louder than the subsequent shrieks and gasps from the 12-and-younger crowd on Saturday at Antietam National Battlefield. Junior Ranger Day, which was divvied into sections aimed at Civil War education as well as teaching those in attendance to be “stewards of the park,” drew about 150 children plus their families, park Ranger Christie Stanczak said. Sam Cool of Hagerstown brought two of his daughters to the battlefield on what he termed a “staycation.” “She studied the Civil War in school and this is firsthand experience - can't beat it,” Cool, 47, said of his 9-year-old daughter, Molly, who described the day as “awesome.” Park volunteers Tracey McIntire and Audrey Scanlan, outfitted in uniforms representing the Iron Brigade - regimes from Wisconsin and Indiana that fought in the cornfield at Antietam - demonstrated how soldiers fired artillery using black powder blanks.
The Herald-Mail Articles
|