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by GREGORY T. SIMMONS | August 9, 2005
HAGERSTOWN gregs@herald-mail.com A proposed increase in city electric charges is under scrutiny by a statewide cable television association that has hinted it will ask state regulators to look at whether the rate change is part of an unfair business practice. In June, the Hagerstown Light Department asked for permission to raise its base rates by an overall 5.32 percent, which would raise revenues by about $865,000. According to a letter submitted to the Maryland Public Service Commission, City Light is not proposing to raise the specific rate to residential customers.
NEWS
May 14, 1997
The base rate and volume rate for residential sewer customers will rise 5 percent July 1 unless the Washington County Commissioners change their minds. The rate for residential sewer customers will be $62.84 a quarter, up from $59.85. The volume rate will be $4.06 per 1,000 gallons over 6,000 gallons in a quarter, up from $3.87. The base rate for large commercial customers will increase from $82.35 to $89.15 a quarter, and the volume rate will rise from $6.34 per 1,000 gallons to $7.20.
NEWS
by GREGORY T. SIMMONS | February 2, 2005
A problem with a City Light Department rate that hasn't been changed since the 1970s will lead to a reduction in the Community Betterment dividend, which is used to pay for community development projects, including mortgage payments on the Hagerstown Ice & Sports Complex. City Light's "base rate," which represents the cost for electric transmission, reflects true costs from about 30 years ago, City Light Manager Mike Spiker said Tuesday. The actual cost is about 1.5 times the city's current base rate, which is 3.2 cents per kilowatt-hour.
NEWS
by DANIEL J. SERNOVITZ | August 26, 2005
daniels@herald-mail.com Mountaineer Gas customers in West Virginia, including some 4,000 residents in the Berkeley County area, can expect to see their natural gas costs climb by as much as $3.70 a month by Nov. 1, 2006, as part of two separate base-rate increases the West Virginia Public Service Commission approved late Wednesday, according to Mountaineer parent company Allegheny Energy. Allegheny Energy spokesman Allen Staggers said the company requested the increases as a condition of its $130 million sale of Mountaineer and associated facilities to a limited partnership formed in July 2004.
NEWS
May 13, 1997
By STEVEN T. DENNIS Staff Writer The Washington County Commissioners voted Tuesday to raise residential sewer rates by 5 percent July 1, despite warnings from staff members that the increase should be higher. The average Washington County customer, who uses 12,000 gallons of water, would pay $16.52 more per year, far less than the $37.60 recommended by staff. "Barring something significant you are almost guaranteeing a higher increase next year," said Water and Sewer Director Gregory Murray.
NEWS
by ERIN JULIUS | June 14, 2007
HANCOCK - The Hancock Town Council approved a budget of more than $1.2 million for its general fund in the coming fiscal year at its meeting Wednesday night. Salaries and benefits are the town's largest expense, coming in at $487,294, according to a draft of the town's budget made available at Wednesday's meeting. Public hearings on the budget and proposed tax rates were held prior to the council's vote, but no citizens spoke. Hancock's property tax rate will remain the same, at $0.395 per $100 of assessed value.
NEWS
By HEATHER KEELS | April 21, 2009
HAGERSTOWN -- The average residential water and sewer customer would pay about $10 more per quarter next fiscal year under rate increases recommended Tuesday by Washington County's Department of Water Quality. The department needs to raise its revenue 4 percent each year for the next 10 years to afford state-mandated treatment upgrades, and make the water and sewer fund more self-sufficient, Environmental Management Director Julie Pippel said. The Washington County commissioners voted 4-0 Tuesday to proceed to a public hearing on the proposed increases.
NEWS
by GREGORY T. SIMMONS | August 2, 2005
HAGERSTOWN gregs@herald-mail.com Hagerstown city officials received nine responses by Friday from companies seeking to be the city's next supplier of wholesale electric power beginning in July 2006. The contract would last at least five years, according to the city's bid request, and could be worth as much as $80 million to $90 million over five years, City Light Department Manager Mike Spiker recently said. The details of the bids now under consideration, including the proposed price of electricity and which companies submitted bids, will remain under wraps for now, Spiker said Monday.
NEWS
March 8, 2005
In the past, The Herald-Mail has written get-out-the-vote editorials that spoke about citizens' civic duty and the sacrifices made by past generations to preserve this precious right. Those are still true, and good reasons to vote in today's Hagerstown primary election. But there are others as well, reasons which may persuade voters to cast ballots. After years of effort, the University System of Maryland was persuaded to locate a campus in downtown Hagerstown. This is important because of the prestige it brings to the city, but also because it provides educational opportunities that local people desperately need.
NEWS
By HEATHER KEELS | heather.keels@herald-mail.com | April 10, 2012
Washington County officials took no action Tuesday on proposed water and sewer rate hikes after a public hearing during which one person spoke. W. Robert Bloyer of Halfway was the only resident to speak at the hearing about proposed rate hikes that would increase the average residential water and sewer bills by about 3 percent. Bloyer did not speak about the proposed increase, but criticized the county's system of charging a base rate for the first 6,000 gallons of water per quarter.
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NEWS
By HEATHER KEELS | heather.keels@herald-mail.com | April 10, 2012
Washington County officials took no action Tuesday on proposed water and sewer rate hikes after a public hearing during which one person spoke. W. Robert Bloyer of Halfway was the only resident to speak at the hearing about proposed rate hikes that would increase the average residential water and sewer bills by about 3 percent. Bloyer did not speak about the proposed increase, but criticized the county's system of charging a base rate for the first 6,000 gallons of water per quarter.
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NEWS
By HEATHER KEELS | April 21, 2009
HAGERSTOWN -- The average residential water and sewer customer would pay about $10 more per quarter next fiscal year under rate increases recommended Tuesday by Washington County's Department of Water Quality. The department needs to raise its revenue 4 percent each year for the next 10 years to afford state-mandated treatment upgrades, and make the water and sewer fund more self-sufficient, Environmental Management Director Julie Pippel said. The Washington County commissioners voted 4-0 Tuesday to proceed to a public hearing on the proposed increases.
NEWS
By JOSHUA BOWMAN | September 13, 2007
WASHINGTON COUNTY - Washington County's Excise Tax Task Force voted Wednesday to change the county's residential excise tax from a flat fee to a rate based on the square footage of a new home. The recommendation, which likely will be drafted into a final report and sent to the Washington County Commissioners later this month, would set the rate at $2 per square foot for new residential construction. The current tax is a flat fee of $13,000 for single-family houses and $15,500 for multi-family houses.
NEWS
by ERIN JULIUS | June 14, 2007
HANCOCK - The Hancock Town Council approved a budget of more than $1.2 million for its general fund in the coming fiscal year at its meeting Wednesday night. Salaries and benefits are the town's largest expense, coming in at $487,294, according to a draft of the town's budget made available at Wednesday's meeting. Public hearings on the budget and proposed tax rates were held prior to the council's vote, but no citizens spoke. Hancock's property tax rate will remain the same, at $0.395 per $100 of assessed value.
NEWS
by DANIEL J. SERNOVITZ | August 26, 2005
daniels@herald-mail.com Mountaineer Gas customers in West Virginia, including some 4,000 residents in the Berkeley County area, can expect to see their natural gas costs climb by as much as $3.70 a month by Nov. 1, 2006, as part of two separate base-rate increases the West Virginia Public Service Commission approved late Wednesday, according to Mountaineer parent company Allegheny Energy. Allegheny Energy spokesman Allen Staggers said the company requested the increases as a condition of its $130 million sale of Mountaineer and associated facilities to a limited partnership formed in July 2004.
NEWS
by GREGORY T. SIMMONS | August 9, 2005
HAGERSTOWN gregs@herald-mail.com A proposed increase in city electric charges is under scrutiny by a statewide cable television association that has hinted it will ask state regulators to look at whether the rate change is part of an unfair business practice. In June, the Hagerstown Light Department asked for permission to raise its base rates by an overall 5.32 percent, which would raise revenues by about $865,000. According to a letter submitted to the Maryland Public Service Commission, City Light is not proposing to raise the specific rate to residential customers.
NEWS
by GREGORY T. SIMMONS | August 2, 2005
HAGERSTOWN gregs@herald-mail.com Hagerstown city officials received nine responses by Friday from companies seeking to be the city's next supplier of wholesale electric power beginning in July 2006. The contract would last at least five years, according to the city's bid request, and could be worth as much as $80 million to $90 million over five years, City Light Department Manager Mike Spiker recently said. The details of the bids now under consideration, including the proposed price of electricity and which companies submitted bids, will remain under wraps for now, Spiker said Monday.
NEWS
March 8, 2005
In the past, The Herald-Mail has written get-out-the-vote editorials that spoke about citizens' civic duty and the sacrifices made by past generations to preserve this precious right. Those are still true, and good reasons to vote in today's Hagerstown primary election. But there are others as well, reasons which may persuade voters to cast ballots. After years of effort, the University System of Maryland was persuaded to locate a campus in downtown Hagerstown. This is important because of the prestige it brings to the city, but also because it provides educational opportunities that local people desperately need.
NEWS
by GREGORY T. SIMMONS | February 2, 2005
A problem with a City Light Department rate that hasn't been changed since the 1970s will lead to a reduction in the Community Betterment dividend, which is used to pay for community development projects, including mortgage payments on the Hagerstown Ice & Sports Complex. City Light's "base rate," which represents the cost for electric transmission, reflects true costs from about 30 years ago, City Light Manager Mike Spiker said Tuesday. The actual cost is about 1.5 times the city's current base rate, which is 3.2 cents per kilowatt-hour.
NEWS
By CANDICE BOSELY | May 30, 2003
martinsburg@herald-mail.com Shoplifting is a concept everyone can understand, while the workers' compensation situation is more complicated. Del. Bob Tabb, D-Jefferson, compared the two, saying that in both cases, those who legitimately pay also pay for those who do not. Tabb, who owns a small business, was one of several people who sat down with Gov. Bob Wise and other state officials in the board room of City Hospital in Martinsburg Thursday afternoon. Wise and Greg Burton, executive director of workers' compensation, explained the problems facing the system and outlined possible solutions.
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