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Barry Tuckwell

NEWS
November 24, 1997
Letters to the Editor United Way not involved To the editor: I read with interest the letter to the editor of Nov. 9, asking if any sponsors of the 135th Battle of Antietam re-enactment were funded by the United Way or tax dollars. I would like to respond to the question on behalf of the United Way and its member agencies. To prevent misunderstanding, let me state categorically that neither United Way or its member agencies participated as sponsors of the re-enactment.
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NEWS
October 1, 1997
Dick and Melodie Tunney, contemporary Christian recording artists Friday, Oct. 10, at 7:30 p.m. The Maryland Theatre 21 S. Potomac St., Hagerstown Tickets are $7 in advance and $10 at the door. Tickets are available at Cedar Ridge Ministries in Williamsport and at area Christian bookstores. For information, call Cedar Ridge at 301-582-0282 Turtle Island String Quartet Saturday, Oct. 11, at 8 p.m. Mountain Green Concerts Kepler Theater Hagerstown Junior College Robinwood Drive, Hagerstown Tickets are $15, reserved.
NEWS
July 15, 1997
By KAREN MASTERSON Staff Writer In commemoration of the 135th observance of the Battle of Antietam, a Civil War concert and fireworks display will be held Saturday, Sept. 13, at Municipal Stadium, representatives of the Maryland Symphony Orchestra said Monday. The performance will feature Civil War-era songs such as "Battle Hymn of the Republic" and "When Johnny Comes Marching Home," to a backdrop of synchronized fireworks, MSO officials said. "We hope the concert will encourage tourists here for Antietam to also visit our fair city," Hagerstown Mayor Robert E. Bruchey II told a small crowd gathered at the stadium.
NEWS
May 16, 1997
By GUY FLETCHER Staff Writer The long list of honors for Barry Tuckwell is growing, as the Maryland Symphony Orchestra maestro and French horn virtuoso has been named to receive the prestigious George Peabody Medal for Outstanding Contributions to Music in America. Tuckwell, a Hagerstown resident, will receive the award next Thursday during graduation ceremonies at the renowned Peabody Institute music conservatory in Baltimore. "I'm very excited, indeed. All these things seem to be coming my way at the moment," said Tuckwell, 66. Tuckwell retired from playing the horn this year, ending a career that spanned six decades - from performing as a teenager in his native Australia to his farewell performances with the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra in January.
NEWS
April 9, 1997
By KERRY LYNN FRALEY Staff Writer Maryland Symphony Orchestra musicians and audience members will help determine who wields the baton after music director Barry Tuckwell leaves next year, said MSO officials, who have begun searching for his successor. The plan is to narrow the pool of applicants to four finalists, who will have a chance to show their techniques during guest conductorships in the 1998-1999 season, said MSO board member Bennett S. Rubin, who is heading the search committee.
NEWS
March 12, 1997
Join music director Barry Tuckwell and Maryland Symphony Orchestra for the grand finale of its 15th anniversary season Saturday, March 15, at 8 p.m. and Sunday, March 16, at 3 p.m. at The Maryland Theatre, 21 S. Potomac St. in Hagerstown. The orchestra will perform Mozart's Symphony No. 41, "Jupiter" and Holst's "The Planets. " Chorus of voices Fourteen sopranos and altos from Masterworks Chorale will join the orchestra for the chorus of female voices during the "Neptune" portion of "The Planets.
NEWS
February 27, 1997
By GUY FLETCHER Staff Writer ANNAPOLIS - Maryland Gov. Parris N. Glendening doesn't pretend to be a student of classical music, but he knows what he likes. "Whenever I go to the orchestra, one of the things I really like is the French horn," Glendening said. On Thursday, Glendening met the person some consider to be the world's greatest French horn player when Barry Tuckwell, conductor of Hagerstown's Maryland Symphony Orchestra, visited. "I'm so honored to meet you. I have heard so much about you," Glendening told Tuckwell.
NEWS
February 13, 1997
By STEVEN T. DENNIS Staff Writer The Maryland Symphony Orchestra's financial future is looking more upbeat thanks to belt-tightening, an increase in single ticket sales and rising contributions, officials say. Instead of facing the first deficit in its 15-year history, the MSO will end the year in the black, officials said. "We expect to break even for the year," MSO President J. Emmet Burke said Wednesday. MSO officials had projected a $61,400 deficit in the orchestra's fiscal 1997 budget.
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