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Barry Tuckwell

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NEWS
March 12, 1997
Join music director Barry Tuckwell and Maryland Symphony Orchestra for the grand finale of its 15th anniversary season Saturday, March 15, at 8 p.m. and Sunday, March 16, at 3 p.m. at The Maryland Theatre, 21 S. Potomac St. in Hagerstown. The orchestra will perform Mozart's Symphony No. 41, "Jupiter" and Holst's "The Planets. " Chorus of voices Fourteen sopranos and altos from Masterworks Chorale will join the orchestra for the chorus of female voices during the "Neptune" portion of "The Planets.
NEWS
November 25, 1997
Letters to the Editor United Way not involved To the editor: I read with interest the letter to the editor of Nov. 9, asking if any sponsors of the 135th Battle of Antietam re-enactment were funded by the United Way or tax dollars. I would like to respond to the question on behalf of the United Way and its member agencies. To prevent and misunderstanding, let me state categorically that neither United Way or its member agencies participated as sponsors of the re-enactment.
NEWS
by ERIN JULIUS | December 7, 2006
HAGERSTOWN - The Maryland Symphony Orchestra's conductor has signed on for another four seasons. The contract of Elizabeth Schulze, who started as MSO music director in 1999, has been extended through the 2011-12 season, according to an MSO news release. "We get a sense from our musicians that they enjoy working with her," Brendan Fitzsimmons, president of the MSO board, said Wednesday. Schulze is out of town, Fitzsimmons said, but she will return to direct the MSO during holiday concerts Dec. 16 and 17, he said.
NEWS
January 23, 1997
By GUY FLETCHER Staff Writer BALTIMORE - Barry Tuckwell's career of mastering the precarious French horn came full circle Thursday night, as he began the last three days of his professional career by performing Mozart's "Horn Concerto No. 3. " It was an appropriate choice of music for Tuckwell, a Hagerstown resident who generally is considered to be the greatest living French horn player. He first performed the concerto 50 years ago, when he started his professional career with an orchestra in his native Australia.
NEWS
By TERI JOHNSON | July 1, 1998
Stars and stripes will figure prominently in Saturday's 13th annual Salute to Independence at Antietam National Battlefield, but they're only part of the celebration. Guest conductor Harry Ellis Dickson will take the audience on a sentimental journey, transported by favorites such as "Orange Blossom Special," "Chattanooga Choo Choo" and "I've Been Working on the Railroad. " Dickson will lead the Maryland Symphony Orchestra in a program of light classical and patriotic music, highlighted by cannon fire and fireworks.
NEWS
July 15, 1997
By KAREN MASTERSON Staff Writer In commemoration of the 135th observance of the Battle of Antietam, a Civil War concert and fireworks display will be held Saturday, Sept. 13, at Municipal Stadium, representatives of the Maryland Symphony Orchestra said Monday. The performance will feature Civil War-era songs such as "Battle Hymn of the Republic" and "When Johnny Comes Marching Home," to a backdrop of synchronized fireworks, MSO officials said. "We hope the concert will encourage tourists here for Antietam to also visit our fair city," Hagerstown Mayor Robert E. Bruchey II told a small crowd gathered at the stadium.
NEWS
February 27, 1997
By GUY FLETCHER Staff Writer ANNAPOLIS - Maryland Gov. Parris N. Glendening doesn't pretend to be a student of classical music, but he knows what he likes. "Whenever I go to the orchestra, one of the things I really like is the French horn," Glendening said. On Thursday, Glendening met the person some consider to be the world's greatest French horn player when Barry Tuckwell, conductor of Hagerstown's Maryland Symphony Orchestra, visited. "I'm so honored to meet you. I have heard so much about you," Glendening told Tuckwell.
NEWS
May 16, 1997
By GUY FLETCHER Staff Writer The long list of honors for Barry Tuckwell is growing, as the Maryland Symphony Orchestra maestro and French horn virtuoso has been named to receive the prestigious George Peabody Medal for Outstanding Contributions to Music in America. Tuckwell, a Hagerstown resident, will receive the award next Thursday during graduation ceremonies at the renowned Peabody Institute music conservatory in Baltimore. "I'm very excited, indeed. All these things seem to be coming my way at the moment," said Tuckwell, 66. Tuckwell retired from playing the horn this year, ending a career that spanned six decades - from performing as a teenager in his native Australia to his farewell performances with the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra in January.
NEWS
November 15, 1996
By GUY FLETCHER Staff Writer Lamenting over the less-than-sparkling condition of his horns, Barry Tuckwell, perhaps the world's most famous French horn player, had a confession. "I've had a bad Brasso day," he said, prompting laughter from the audience at the Maryland Theatre. Officially, it was "Maestro Tuckwell Presents the Mysteries of the French Horn," but it could have been simply called Horn 101. For nearly an hour Friday afternoon, Tuckwell took his "students," more than 100 people who came for the free lunchtime program, through hundreds of years of horns and horn playing.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By KATE COLEMAN | katec@herald-mail.com | March 14, 2012
“Sacred Structures,” the fourth Masterworks concert of the Maryland Symphony Orchestra's 30th anniversary season, explores the connections between early Christian music and the music of the concert hall, Music Director Elizabeth Schulze wrote in an email. Each of the four composers used ancient Christian chant music as a jumping off point in their works on this weekend's program, she wrote. Nikolay Rimsky-Korsakov depicts a sacred ceremony in Russian Easter Festival Overture. Michael Daugherty, inspired by the grand architecture of the Notre Dame Cathedral in Paris and the Empire State Building in New York, wrote “Raise the Roof.” “Prayer of St. Gregory” is Alan Hovhaness' prayer without words, and Ottorino Respighi's “Church Windows” portrays images in stained-glass windows.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By KATE COLEMAN | katec@herald-mail.com | September 21, 2011
Barry Tuckwell, founding music director of the Maryland Symphony Orchestra, recalls an afternoon conversation with Frances Machen in the spring of 1981. Machen, a local music lover who died last year, had earlier asked the world-renowned French horn virtuoso about leading a symphony orchestra in Hagerstown.   "In two hours we conceived the orchestra," he wrote in an email from his native Australia. "A few months later the orchestra was born," he added. Tuckwell led the MSO for 16 years.
NEWS
By KATE COLEMAN | November 13, 2009
By the time she was about 9 years old, Karen Smith Manar had decided she wanted a career as a musician. She started playing bassoon in middle school. It became obvious, she said, that it was the instrument that spoke to her musically, the instrument that was "in her soul. " "That sound, that range of notes, that mellowness, the role the bassoon plays in the orchestra - that was where I should be," she said. "That was the instrument I could speak best through. " The Trenton, N.J., girl came to Maryland to earn her bachelor and master's degrees in performance at Peabody Conservatory of Music at Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore.
NEWS
By KATE COLEMAN | October 16, 2008
If Teresa Gordon had the money for medical school, she probably would have pursued a career as a surgeon. Instead, the 36-year-old Winchester, Va., resident won scholarships and studied violin at Shenandoah Conservatory. She has made a life in music. She began playing in the Maryland Symphony Orchestra's second violin section in 1994, moved away for a while and returned to become a full-time member again seven years ago. "I love music. I love people. It really doesn't matter what I do. I just enjoy whatever I do," Gordon said.
NEWS
By KATE COLEMAN | October 15, 2007
HAGERSTOWN - Chambersburg, Pa., residents Jerine Dunham and her husband like to sit on the left side of The Maryland Theatre when the Maryland Symphony Orchestra hosts a piano soloist. They want to see the artist's hands. Twenty-year-old pianist Yuja Wang and the MSO performed Peter Ilich Tchaikovsky's Piano Concerto No. 1 in B-flat minor Sunday. Dunham's view was good. "I saw a blur," she said. "This is a very special young artist," said MSO Music Director Elizabeth Schulze as she introduced Wang during Prelude, the preconcert discussion.
NEWS
By MARLO BARNHART | July 1, 2007
Editor's note: Each Sunday, The Herald-Mail publishes "A Life Remembered. " This continuing series takes a look back - through the eyes of family, friends, co-workers and others - at a member of the community who died recently. Today's "A Life Remembered" is about Walter A. Lawson, who died June 13 at the age of 84. His obituary appeared in the June 20 editions of The Morning Herald and The Daily Mail. In the revered Prokofiev composition "Peter and the Wolf," the French horn provides the musical theme for the wolf, symbolically mimicking the deep and sinister nature of the beast.
NEWS
by ERIN JULIUS | December 7, 2006
HAGERSTOWN - The Maryland Symphony Orchestra's conductor has signed on for another four seasons. The contract of Elizabeth Schulze, who started as MSO music director in 1999, has been extended through the 2011-12 season, according to an MSO news release. "We get a sense from our musicians that they enjoy working with her," Brendan Fitzsimmons, president of the MSO board, said Wednesday. Schulze is out of town, Fitzsimmons said, but she will return to direct the MSO during holiday concerts Dec. 16 and 17, he said.
NEWS
By KATE COLEMAN | March 24, 2000
Robert Grab, a musician who was second trumpet with the Maryland Symphony Orchestra, died Wednesday at Johns Hopkins Hospital. He was 43. Grab had been ill since the beginning of February with a rare reaction to the Epstein-Barr virus, according to his brother, Charles Grab, MSO's principal trumpeter. Grab was among the most positive and supportive players in the orchestra, said Maryland Symphony Orchestra Music Director Elizabeth Schulze. He gave of his time above and beyond the concert schedule, both in the schools and the community, Schulze said.
NEWS
January 6, 2000
By ANDREA BROWN-HURLEY / Staff Writer photo: KEVIN G. GILBERT / staff photographer Bennett Rubin was a "shoe"-in for the Maryland Symphony Orchestra board's top job. The Hagerstown resident, who will take his post as MSO president in July 2000, has a past steeped in music, basted by business and flavored with charity. He produced Grammy-nominated jazz albums and headed a Hagerstown-based shoe company before retiring in the early to mid-1990s to pursue charitable interests from his office at 82 W. Washington St. Rubin is a trustee on the boards of the Washington County Museum of Fine Art, Community Foundation of Washington County and Goodwill Industries of Hagerstown, he said.
NEWS
March 19, 1999
If the Maryland Symphony Orchestra board was provincial and rawboned in its treatment of founding conductor Barry Tuckwell, it was equally smart and seamless in the selection process that brought us Elizabeth Schulze, who becomes only the second maestro in the symphony's 17-year history. Keep in mind I'm writing from the perspective of a fellow who thinks an impresario is a new line of computers from Compaq, but I believe Schulze to be an excellent choice. Any of the four finalists chosen by the MSO board would have been fine, no question.
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