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LIFESTYLE
April 11, 2012
The Kiwanis Club of Hagerstown will join Kiwanis International to "Eliminate" maternal/neonatal tetanus. The projected goal of Kiwanis International is to raise $110,000,000 by 2015. Poor hygiene and lack of health care education promote tetanus, especially during birth. Without treatment, an infected newborn dies within days. The Kiwanis Club of Hagerstown will provide annual support for Project Eliminate through 2015. Anyone interested in joining with Kiwanis Club members can  contact John Roney at 301-331-0064 or lincoln53@myactv.net .
LIFESTYLE
By MARIE GILBERT | marieg@herald-mail.com | November 2, 2012
Flesh-eating bacteria might sound like something from a science fiction movie or an episode of "The Twilight Zone. " But it isn't make believe. Instead, it's a real-life horror story - one where a micro-organism enters the body through an open wound and begins to consume tissue from the inside out. Brent Hoover never suspected he would have fallen victim to such an infection. He never would have imagined that a swollen arm would have resulted in the loss of a bicep or that he would have four surgeries to remove the bacteria that was destroying his body.
NEWS
February 2, 2005
OCEAN CITY, Md. (AP) - Water samples were taken Tuesday to determine whether the bacteria that causes Legionnaire's disease has been successfully removed from the water system of a condominium complex where three residents came down with the disease, killing one, a county health official said. County health officials first tested the water in the building after the first two cases were reported. Those tests indicated the presence of the bacteria at several points, prompting health officials to recommend disinfection of the water system, which was done over the weekend, said Debbie Goeller, a Worcester County health officer.
NEWS
By CHRIS COPLEY | September 6, 2010
You are like a planet, and your skin is populated with hundreds of different species of microbes. And that is healthy and normal. This eye-opening perspective came from Dr. David Karstaedt, assistant professor of anatomy and physiology and microbiology at Hagerstown Community College. "The thing that's interesting about the human body - we're completely covered in microbes," Karstaedt said. "If your body were to somehow dissolve, your friends would still recognize you. The microbes on your skin would still be there.
NEWS
August 6, 1997
By LISA GRAYBEAL Staff Writer, Chambersburg CHAMBERSBURG, Pa. - A Chambersburg man died of Legionnaires' disease at Chambersburg Hospital Sunday, the second person in a month to be treated for the illness in what hospital officials say are isolated and unrelated cases. Ralph F. Steele, 68, of 454 Highland Ave., died of the pneumonia-like illness after a month-long stay at the hospital, according to Linda Maguyon, Steele's daughter. Chambersburg Hospital officials would not confirm Steele died there of the disease.
NEWS
March 20, 2001
Tips for cleaning your kitchen In anticipation of spring, many people make a ritual of spring cleaning. When cleaning a kitchen, it's important to remember there's more to the task than producing shiny floors and neatly arranged cupboards. Spring is a great time to target harmful bacteria that can lurk on kitchen surfaces and in your refrigerator. Salmonella, Staphyloccus, E. coli and Listeria are just some of the bacteria that may be hanging out in your kitchen. While you can't see or smell bacteria, they are everywhere, especially in moist environments.
NEWS
February 21, 2002
Sewage plant awaits results of water tests By DAN KULIN dank@herald-mail.com At the Hagerstown sewage treatment plant Wednesday, the last of the several sewage treatment processes shut down 12 days earlier was restarted, Plant Superintendent Donald Barton said. The biological nutrient removal process, which uses bacteria to remove nitrogen and phosphorous from sewage, was restarted at about 11 a.m. Wednesday, he said. "All the components are back on line.
NEWS
February 20, 2002
Sewage treatment getting better, says plant supervisor By DAN KULIN dank@herald-mail.com Hagerstown's sewage treatment plant continues to improve, and there are plans to bring another part of the treatment process back online today, Plant Superintendent Donald Barton said Tuesday. Sometime today the part of the sewage treatment process that removes phosphorous and nitrogen from the waste water will be restarted, he said. Even though this process, called biological nutrient removal, has been down, tests of the waste water taken last week showed that nitrogen and phosphorous levels were within state limits, he said.
NEWS
January 29, 2008
WALKERSVILLE, Md. (AP) -- It could be another week before residents of Walkersville can safely drink their tap water without boiling it. Frederick County officials say tests of untreated water collected over the weekend from the water supply show high levels of bacteria and E. coli. Although the water was acceptable after it was treated, officials say some bacteria may be resistant to treatment. Test results on individual wells are pending. The boil advisory was issued after a pipe broke Friday in a manure lagoon on a farm in northern Walkersville.
NEWS
by GREGORY T. SIMMONS | August 10, 2004
Water quality warnings along Antietam Creek were lifted over the weekend, nearly a week after they were posted, a Washington County Health Department official said Monday. The City of Hagerstown's Waste Water Treatment Plant on Frederick Street on Aug. 2 released 2.7 million gallons of waste water that was partially treated but not disinfected for bacteria found in human feces. Although there is always some level of illness-causing bacteria in the creek, or any natural body of water, the release raised those levels in the creek.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By JENNIFER FITCH | waynesboro@herald-mail.com | May 29, 2013
A Chambersburg-area farm involved in a bacteria outbreak last year is the subject of a new warning from the Pennsylvania departments of health and agriculture. Five people who consumed unpasteurized milk from The Family Cow, 3854 Olde Scotland Road, between April 30 and May 10 suffered illnesses confirmed to be related to Campylobacter bacteria, according to a news release from the state departments issued Wednesday. “Agriculture officials ordered the owners of the farm to stop the sale of all raw milk until further notice,” the news release stated.
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NEWS
April 11, 2013
Penn State Extension, Franklin County, is offering a water-testing program during National Drinking Water Week, May 6 to 10. The program encourages private well owners to test their water at group rates. The results of previous testing show that about one of every three well owners will discover the presence of coliform bacteria in their well water. About one of every six wells will have nitrates above the recommended limit for drinking water. Something can be done about these problems if you know you have them.
LIFESTYLE
By MARIE GILBERT | marieg@herald-mail.com | November 2, 2012
Flesh-eating bacteria might sound like something from a science fiction movie or an episode of "The Twilight Zone. " But it isn't make believe. Instead, it's a real-life horror story - one where a micro-organism enters the body through an open wound and begins to consume tissue from the inside out. Brent Hoover never suspected he would have fallen victim to such an infection. He never would have imagined that a swollen arm would have resulted in the loss of a bicep or that he would have four surgeries to remove the bacteria that was destroying his body.
LIFESTYLE
April 11, 2012
The Kiwanis Club of Hagerstown will join Kiwanis International to "Eliminate" maternal/neonatal tetanus. The projected goal of Kiwanis International is to raise $110,000,000 by 2015. Poor hygiene and lack of health care education promote tetanus, especially during birth. Without treatment, an infected newborn dies within days. The Kiwanis Club of Hagerstown will provide annual support for Project Eliminate through 2015. Anyone interested in joining with Kiwanis Club members can  contact John Roney at 301-331-0064 or lincoln53@myactv.net .
NEWS
By JENNIFER FITCH | waynesboro@herald-mail.com | February 2, 2012
Maryland health officials say laboratory tests have confirmed the presence of the illness-causing bacteria, Campylobacter jejuni, in two unopened samples purchased from the Family Cow farm in Chambersburg The number of people in Pennsylvania, Maryland, West Virginia and New Jersey stricken with illness after consuming raw, unpasteurized milk from the same farm has risen to 37, the Pennsylvania Department of Health confirmed Thursday. Pennsylvania officials said their tests for bacteria in samples had not yet yielded results.
NEWS
By JENNIFER FITCH | waynesboro@herald-mail.com | August 30, 2011
What would be the busiest season at Cowans Gap State Park is coming to a close, but the lake has been closed to swimming since Aug. 9 as state officials try to find the source of an E. coli strain. An outbreak of E. coli O157 sickened at least 15 people who swam in the lake in mid- to late-July. Among them was 2-year-old Madisyn Myers, whose mother said she received a clean bill of health Monday after three weeks of illness. The child had diarrhea and a urinary tract infection.
NEWS
By JENNIFER FITCH | waynesboro@herald-mail.com | August 18, 2011
E. coli bacteria has been found in a well water sample from Cowans Gap State Park, the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection confirmed Thursday. But departmental spokeswoman Lisa Kasianowitz said it is not bacteria from the same strain that has sickened 14 park visitors since mid-July. The agency issued a boil-water advisory late Wednesday for campers and other visitors to the park, Kasianowitz said in an email. Testing found E. coli in one of two wells at the park, she said.
NEWS
By CHRIS COPLEY | September 6, 2010
You are like a planet, and your skin is populated with hundreds of different species of microbes. And that is healthy and normal. This eye-opening perspective came from Dr. David Karstaedt, assistant professor of anatomy and physiology and microbiology at Hagerstown Community College. "The thing that's interesting about the human body - we're completely covered in microbes," Karstaedt said. "If your body were to somehow dissolve, your friends would still recognize you. The microbes on your skin would still be there.
NEWS
By TIFFANY ARNOLD | June 23, 2008
The emergence of Clostridium difficile, a bacteria associated with long-term antibiotic use, has prompted health officials to scrutinize how and when antibiotics are given as treatment. "If there's any silver lining at all, it's that a lot of clinics and hospitals are coming to grips with the fact that antibiotics are not without risks, they have unintended consequences," said Dr. Cliff McDonald, medical epidemiologist for the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Clostridium difficile, or C. diff.
NEWS
By MATTHEW UMSTEAD | February 14, 2008
MARTINSBURG, W.Va. - The presence of coliform bacteria in samples of water taken from the northern and northwestern portions of Berkeley County's public water system in December might never be fully explained, the system's administrator said Wednesday. After consulting with experts and engineers about the discovery of the naturally occurring bacteria contamination, Berkeley County Public Water Service District Executive Director Paul Fisher said he found out that such contamination was not as infrequent as he previously thought.
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