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Baby Boomers

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NEWS
June 9, 2006
In case you haven't heard, the baby boomers aren't so young any more. In five years, the first of them will be 65. That sounds like a lot of time, but to the West Virginia officials looking at an overhaul of the state's long-term care system, it will take all of that time - and maybe more - to get the job done correctly. To say that the issue is urgent is no exaggeration. The Associated Press reports that 15.3 percent of the state's residents are older than 65. That's third in the nation after Pennsylvania, with 15.6 percent and Florida, with 17.6 percent.
NEWS
by MARLO BARNHART | March 29, 2004
marlob@herald-mail.com Pat Murphy and his wife, Beverly, have dedicated their lives to the teaching profession in West Virginia and while both are planning to stay in the educational system for a while longer, they are part of a larger group facing retirement throughout the Tri-State area. Many baby boomers - those who were born in great numbers after World War II - are now in their 50s and 60s. Their sheer numbers are going to impact some school systems when they leave their classrooms.
NEWS
March 27, 1997
By LAURA ERNDE Staff Writer When JoNell VanNorman awoke on the morning of March 18, she heard the occasional honk of a car horn outside her Potomac Avenue house, but thought nothing of it. Only later did she discover that the noise was directly connected to a milestone that she and many other baby boomers are hitting this year - her 50th birthday. A 5-by-7-foot lighted sign on her front lawn asked motorists to: "HONK YOUR HORN CUZ 50 YEARS AGO MA WAS BORN. " "I thought it was funny," said VanNorman, whose three children pulled the prank.
NEWS
By CHRISTINE BRUN / Creators Services | March 7, 2009
No matter what anyone says, turning 60 is no fun. Some 58 million baby boomers no longer find it as appealing when they hear The Who's Roger Daltrey sing the line from "My Generation": "I hope I die before I get old. " Despite the popular media images of a more vibrant senior population, the changing physical needs of age exist for most of us. One thing that becomes apparent as we age is that our bodies don't work in the same splendid way they...
NEWS
By MARIE GILBERT | May 17, 2010
Years ago, aging gracefully meant living comfortably with crow's feet, wrinkles and a less than perfect body. Then, along came the baby boomers. Not content to accept the image staring back at them in the mirror, the generation of 50- to 60-somethings has decided not to allow growing older to get under their collective skin. Instead, they are finding ways to give Father Time a knockout punch. So, they're heading to spas, plastic surgeons and dermatologists - all in an effort to put their best face forward.
NEWS
by JENNIFER FITCH | July 17, 2006
GREENCASTLE, Pa. - On the steps of the Allison-Antrim Museum is a Dairimaid milk box with glass bottles inside, seemingly awaiting a delivery more than 50 years past its original use. The milk box serves as the only clue outside the museum that inside the 1950s and 1960s thrive in "Life was Different in Black and White," an exhibit that has had its run extended into August. It next will be open Thursday from noon to 3 p.m. at the museum on South Ridge Avenue. The display of fashions, toys, electronics and housewares has elicited "a lot of memories from the baby boomers," said Bonnie Shockey, the museum's president.
NEWS
By GREG SIMMONS | August 13, 1999
Loyalton, one of five new residential centers designed for senior citizens in Washington County, opened its doors Friday. Loyalton, an assisted living center, cost $7 million to complete and will employ about 50 staff members. It has the capacity for about 125 residents. "Assisted living in this area is really a new concept," said Mitzi Valentine, marketing director for Loyalton, which is owned by the Emeritus Corp. of Seattle. Assisted living communities fill the gap between in-home care for the elderly and nursing home care, Valentine said.
NEWS
by JENNIFER FITCH | July 18, 2006
GREENCASTLE, Pa. - On the steps of the Allison-Antrim Museum is a Dairimaid milk box with glass bottles inside, seemingly awaiting a delivery more than 50 years past its original use. The milk box serves as the only clue outside the museum that inside the 1950s and 1960s thrive in "Life was Different in Black and White," an exhibit that has had its run extended into August. It next will be open Thursday from noon to 3 p.m. at the museum on South Ridge Avenue. The display of fashions, toys, electronics and housewares has elicited "a lot of memories from the baby boomers," said Bonnie Shockey, the museum's president.
BUSINESS
April 29, 2012
Name of business: Your Natural Path Wellness Center Owner: Dr. Anorah C. Schostag, naturopathic doctor Address: 2433 Hedgesville Road, Martinsburg, W.Va. Opening date: March 17, 2012 Products and services: Naturopathic medicine, including individualized health consultations; natural healing modalities used include herbal preparations, homeopathy, hydrotherapy, nutrition, dietary supplementation and lifestyle counseling; natural pharmacy with remedies only available through physicians; thermal body imaging (thermography)
NEWS
December 18, 2005
Name of business: Arbonne International Owner: Kathy Reeder Address: 10968 Dam No. 5 Road Opening date: February 2004 Products: Health/wellness products, aromatherapy and anti-aging products Services: "Helping teach others what I know to help them become successful and achieve their goals and help them earn their company car. " Market area: Baby boomers How did you get into...
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
April 29, 2012
Name of business: Your Natural Path Wellness Center Owner: Dr. Anorah C. Schostag, naturopathic doctor Address: 2433 Hedgesville Road, Martinsburg, W.Va. Opening date: March 17, 2012 Products and services: Naturopathic medicine, including individualized health consultations; natural healing modalities used include herbal preparations, homeopathy, hydrotherapy, nutrition, dietary supplementation and lifestyle counseling; natural pharmacy with remedies only available through physicians; thermal body imaging (thermography)
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LIFESTYLE
By MARIE GILBERT | marieg@herald-mail.com | November 7, 2010
Long before the retirement party, most people probably have envisioned life without work. They imagine less stress and more time to pursue interests - such as gardening, volunteering or traveling the world. It will be like one long vacation, without ever having to return to the office. But the reality of retirement can be quite different than the concept. Retirement might mean relocation, losing social contacts or a lack of structure in your day-to-day activities.
NEWS
By MARIE GILBERT | May 17, 2010
Years ago, aging gracefully meant living comfortably with crow's feet, wrinkles and a less than perfect body. Then, along came the baby boomers. Not content to accept the image staring back at them in the mirror, the generation of 50- to 60-somethings has decided not to allow growing older to get under their collective skin. Instead, they are finding ways to give Father Time a knockout punch. So, they're heading to spas, plastic surgeons and dermatologists - all in an effort to put their best face forward.
NEWS
September 1, 2009
How do we make Social Security sustainable? To the editor: I applaud Anna Lee Burker for her recent letter on Social Security ( "Support the No Social Security Benefit Cut Bill," Monday, Aug. 24, page A4). Burker has written dozens of such letters over the years, opposing program cuts, demanding increases and criticizing a private accounts option. Her passion and dedication are commendable. Unfortunately, in all those letters, she has never discussed how to make Social Security sustainable.
NEWS
By CHRISTINE BRUN / Creators Services | March 7, 2009
No matter what anyone says, turning 60 is no fun. Some 58 million baby boomers no longer find it as appealing when they hear The Who's Roger Daltrey sing the line from "My Generation": "I hope I die before I get old. " Despite the popular media images of a more vibrant senior population, the changing physical needs of age exist for most of us. One thing that becomes apparent as we age is that our bodies don't work in the same splendid way they...
NEWS
By MARLO BARNHART | May 6, 2008
BOONSBORO - With the passing of John Harlan Bast Jr. last fall, the historic Bast Funeral Home has experienced some changes - its name and the range of options available to its customers by the new owners. But everyone associated with Bast-Stauffer Funeral Home agrees that the quality of service, the compassionate associates and the warm and comfortable surroundings will remain as before. After all, the business has relied on those attributes since 1837 when the business began.
NEWS
by JENNIFER FITCH | July 18, 2006
GREENCASTLE, Pa. - On the steps of the Allison-Antrim Museum is a Dairimaid milk box with glass bottles inside, seemingly awaiting a delivery more than 50 years past its original use. The milk box serves as the only clue outside the museum that inside the 1950s and 1960s thrive in "Life was Different in Black and White," an exhibit that has had its run extended into August. It next will be open Thursday from noon to 3 p.m. at the museum on South Ridge Avenue. The display of fashions, toys, electronics and housewares has elicited "a lot of memories from the baby boomers," said Bonnie Shockey, the museum's president.
NEWS
by JENNIFER FITCH | July 17, 2006
GREENCASTLE, Pa. - On the steps of the Allison-Antrim Museum is a Dairimaid milk box with glass bottles inside, seemingly awaiting a delivery more than 50 years past its original use. The milk box serves as the only clue outside the museum that inside the 1950s and 1960s thrive in "Life was Different in Black and White," an exhibit that has had its run extended into August. It next will be open Thursday from noon to 3 p.m. at the museum on South Ridge Avenue. The display of fashions, toys, electronics and housewares has elicited "a lot of memories from the baby boomers," said Bonnie Shockey, the museum's president.
NEWS
July 14, 2006
GREENCASTLE, Pa. - Do you remember Barney Fife, the Little Rascals, "Gunsmoke," Saturday morning westerns with Gene Autry, Roy Rogers and Dale Evans and the Lone Ranger, Mr. Wizard, Lassie and Rin Tin Tin, M-I-C K-E-Y M-O-U-S-E, or listening to the first-manned space shot over your classroom PA system? Allison-Antrim Museum, 365 S. Ridge Ave., will host open houses on Sunday from 1 to 4 p.m. and on July 20 from noon to 3 p.m., with an exhibit catering to those who remember the aforementioned bits of nostalgia.
NEWS
June 9, 2006
In case you haven't heard, the baby boomers aren't so young any more. In five years, the first of them will be 65. That sounds like a lot of time, but to the West Virginia officials looking at an overhaul of the state's long-term care system, it will take all of that time - and maybe more - to get the job done correctly. To say that the issue is urgent is no exaggeration. The Associated Press reports that 15.3 percent of the state's residents are older than 65. That's third in the nation after Pennsylvania, with 15.6 percent and Florida, with 17.6 percent.
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