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By KATE S. ALEXANDER | August 28, 2008
GREENCASTLE, Pa. - Antrim Township auditors said they need more information before they can set the salaries of newly appointed Interim Township Administrator Fred Young and Interim Utilities Director/Roadmaster Rick Baer. Following a one-hour executive session Wednesday, the three elected auditors voted to hold off on paying Young and Baer until Young could provided the auditors with job descriptions for the positions as well as the qualifications and experiences of both he and Baer.
NEWS
September 30, 1997
Auditors reviewing the local school system's books could not tell whether money intended to help at-risk students was given to schools as budgeted, according to a recent financial audit. The problem was due to a new requirement that mandated certain records be kept that were not being formulated by the school system, said Chris South, director of budget and finance for Washington County schools. Officials do not believe services to at-risk children were threatened, said Richard J. Constantino of Keller Bruner & Co., the Frederick, Md., firm that conducted the audit.
NEWS
By KATE S. ALEXANDER | August 28, 2008
GREENCASTLE, Pa. - Antrim Township auditors said they need more information before they can set the salaries of newly appointed Interim Township Administrator Fred Young and Interim Utilities Director/Roadmaster Rick Baer. Following a one-hour executive session Wednesday, the three elected auditors voted to hold off on paying Young and Baer until Young could provided the auditors with job descriptions for the positions as well as the qualifications and experiences of both he and Baer.
NEWS
November 20, 2003
Auditors were denied access to 10 of 25 records sought, or 40 percent of the time. Auditors were asked who they were in 11 of 25 instances, or 44 percent of the time. Auditors were asked why they wanted the record in 7 of 25 instances, or 28 percent of the time. Auditors were asked who they worked for in 5 of 25 instances, or 20 percent of the time. Under Maryland law, a person requesting a record does not have to say who they are, why they want the record or who they work for. In one case, the employee told the auditor that his simply wanting the public record was not a good enough reason for her to provide it. Auditors were required to file a written Public Information Act request in 15 of the 25 instances, or 60 percent of the time.
NEWS
November 30, 1999
The town of Williamsport faces a $555,000 deficit, a result of falling hundreds of thousands of dollars short of its general-fund budget for two consecutive years, auditors said Monday. Read the full story in Tuesday's Herald-Mail newspapers.
NEWS
December 12, 2000
City told to write off loans By DAN KULIN / Staff Writer The City of Hagerstown's annual audit was presented to the Mayor and City Council Tuesday, and auditors gave the city good marks overall with a few "housekeeping" recommendations, including writing off $195,000 in old loans. Those loans were made by the city using Community Development Block Grant funds, which is federal money the city distributes. City Finance Director Al Martin said the outstanding loans are $290,000 that paid for some renovations of the Hamilton Hotel building at the corner of Jonathan and West Washington streets, plus a $5,000 small business loan.
NEWS
August 30, 2000
How audit was done What is AccessMaryland and how was it done? Twenty Maryland newspapers participated in the open records audit of the state's 23 counties and Baltimore City organized by the Maryland-Delaware-District of Columbia Press Association's Freedom of Information subcommittee. Auditors were given instruction sheets for each record sought and at regional meetings prior to the audit were briefed on procedures. Auditors were told to not misrepresent themselves, but to be evasive if asked who they were or why they wanted the public records.
NEWS
by ERIN CUNNINGHAM and KAREN HANNA | June 30, 2006
CLEAR SPRING - Clear Spring Volunteer Fire Co. officials met with auditors Thursday afternoon for about an hour, but the investigation into the department's finances is not yet complete, company President Ronald Poole said. "They had some papers and some questions they asked us, and that was to help them compile a report, which was in a draft stage, I think," Poole said. Jim Hovis, director of the Washington County Gaming Office, said county and state officials were coming to the end of the investigation, which began last month amidst allegations of wrongdoing in the department's bingo and tip jar operations.
NEWS
By GUY FLETCHER | June 28, 1998
photo: RIC DUGAN / staff photographer enlarge One of the most significant accomplishments the Washington County Board of Education has touted during the past decades was the implementation of a new curriculum intended to be a blueprint for the things students should learn in county classrooms. But there was one significant problem with what is known as the essential curriculum: There are few ways to measure if it's working. "It's like building a building and not putting a foundation under it," said Schools Superintendent Herman G. Bartlett Jr. --cont from front page -- A lack of sufficient assessment tools was one of the many deficiencies cited in a study last year of how well the school system delivers the product of education to its student customers.
NEWS
by JIM LEE/Carroll County Times | November 20, 2003
Some state agencies have embraced technology as a means of providing the public greater access to records. Others have been unable to get a handle on their use of computer files or, worse, have used computer technology as an excuse to deny access to public records. Almost every state agency tested in an Aug. 21 survey did not offer public records in an electronic format, and did not release information included in a database. "If there is a database and it does contain information that is clearly public, that agency should make an effort to make that available through a Web site," said Tom Marquardt, Editor of The Capitol in Annapolis and Chairman of the Maryland-Delaware-D.
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NEWS
By JULIE E. GREENE | julieg@herald-mail.com | July 7, 2013
A recent state audit of several financial operations at Washington County Public Schools resulted in recommendations on how to improve internal controls and safeguards, including verifying costs provided by outside parties. The school system has or is responding to all 18 findings, and in several cases already has addressed the deficiencies, according to the school system's response to the state and school system officials. One of the findings has the school system working with a heating oil broker to recover more than $600 believed to have been billed to the school system in error, said David Brandenburg, the school system's director of accounting.
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NEWS
By RICHARD F. BELISLE | richardb@herald-mail.com | November 2, 2011
Paul Shroyer, a retired West Virginia state auditor who spent 17 years auditing county books, has been hired by the Jefferson County Commissioners to keep the county's finances on track. Shroyer, 69, of Grafton, W.Va., was selected from a field of 13 applicants. He begins his $75,000-a-year-job as director of financial management Nov. 14. "This is a specialized position," County Administrator Tim Boyde said. After 17 years as a state auditor, Shroyer has an understanding of the county budgetary process, Boyde said.
NEWS
By DON AINES | October 1, 2008
CHAMBERSBURG, Pa. -- A routine state audit is scheduled for next week, but Chambersburg Area School District Superintendent Joseph Padasak said he asked auditors to look specifically at conference and credit card expenditures in light of questions raised by a citizens group. The audit is to examine the transportation, attendance, certifications and other facets of district operations, Padasak said Tuesday night. The auditors also will be taking another look at how the district used credit cards that had been issued to administrators.
NEWS
By KATE S. ALEXANDER | August 28, 2008
GREENCASTLE, Pa. - Antrim Township auditors said they need more information before they can set the salaries of newly appointed Interim Township Administrator Fred Young and Interim Utilities Director/Roadmaster Rick Baer. Following a one-hour executive session Wednesday, the three elected auditors voted to hold off on paying Young and Baer until Young could provided the auditors with job descriptions for the positions as well as the qualifications and experiences of both he and Baer.
NEWS
By KATE S. ALEXANDER | August 28, 2008
GREENCASTLE, Pa. - Antrim Township auditors said they need more information before they can set the salaries of newly appointed Interim Township Administrator Fred Young and Interim Utilities Director/Roadmaster Rick Baer. Following a one-hour executive session Wednesday, the three elected auditors voted to hold off on paying Young and Baer until Young could provided the auditors with job descriptions for the positions as well as the qualifications and experiences of both he and Baer.
NEWS
by JIM LEE / Carroll County Times | March 11, 2007
In Kent County, people can find out in a matter of minutes how their officials would react in the event of an emergency. In Wicomico County, people asking for the same documents are told releasing the information is against county policy. Across the state, auditors asking for their community's Comprehensive Emergency Response Plan - a document that by federal law should readily be available to the public - were met with distrust, disorganization and denials. Of 23 Maryland jurisdictions surveyed, only six auditors were able to immediately obtain the document.
NEWS
by ERIN CUNNINGHAM and KAREN HANNA | June 30, 2006
CLEAR SPRING - Clear Spring Volunteer Fire Co. officials met with auditors Thursday afternoon for about an hour, but the investigation into the department's finances is not yet complete, company President Ronald Poole said. "They had some papers and some questions they asked us, and that was to help them compile a report, which was in a draft stage, I think," Poole said. Jim Hovis, director of the Washington County Gaming Office, said county and state officials were coming to the end of the investigation, which began last month amidst allegations of wrongdoing in the department's bingo and tip jar operations.
NEWS
by JIM LEE/Carroll County Times | November 20, 2003
Some state agencies have embraced technology as a means of providing the public greater access to records. Others have been unable to get a handle on their use of computer files or, worse, have used computer technology as an excuse to deny access to public records. Almost every state agency tested in an Aug. 21 survey did not offer public records in an electronic format, and did not release information included in a database. "If there is a database and it does contain information that is clearly public, that agency should make an effort to make that available through a Web site," said Tom Marquardt, Editor of The Capitol in Annapolis and Chairman of the Maryland-Delaware-D.
NEWS
November 20, 2003
Auditors were denied access to 10 of 25 records sought, or 40 percent of the time. Auditors were asked who they were in 11 of 25 instances, or 44 percent of the time. Auditors were asked why they wanted the record in 7 of 25 instances, or 28 percent of the time. Auditors were asked who they worked for in 5 of 25 instances, or 20 percent of the time. Under Maryland law, a person requesting a record does not have to say who they are, why they want the record or who they work for. In one case, the employee told the auditor that his simply wanting the public record was not a good enough reason for her to provide it. Auditors were required to file a written Public Information Act request in 15 of the 25 instances, or 60 percent of the time.
NEWS
November 20, 2003
Real Estate Appraiser Complaints Record Received: No In a telephone conversation with an employee of the Department of Labor and Licensing, the auditor was told to send a PIA request to the Board of Real Estate Appraisers. More than a month passed before any response was received. After sending $5.75 to cover the cost of copies, as required by the agency, no records were ever sent to the auditor. Latest Bay Bridge Inspection Report Record Received: No In a telephone conversation with the State Highway Administration, auditor quizzed about employment and told to send a PIA request.
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