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NEWS
By DAVE McMILLION | August 11, 2008
HARPERS FERRY, W.Va. - A cool breeze blew beneath towering trees at the top of Bolivar Heights Sunday and the views of nearby mountains were so vivid it seem they could be touched. A pleasant place to be on a hot summer day. But it was not such a nice place 146 years ago. That's when Confederate Gen. Thomas "Stonewall" Jackson oversaw the capture of 12,500 Union troops in the Civil War. On Sept. 15, 1862, a line of Union troops was stationed along Bolivar Heights, which is off Washington Street in Bolivar, W.Va.
OPINION
By TIM ROWLAND | timr@herald-mail.com | December 16, 2011
One hundred and fifty years ago on a mission to disrupt northern transportation, Stonewall Jackson ran into a troublesome spot by the name of Hancock, Md. He demanded the town surrender or else he would bomb it out of existence. Union men said he should feel free, since half the population were southern sympathizers anyway, and their demise would constitute no great heartbreak for the North. Without any good way to cross the Potomac River and make good on his threat, a frustrated Jackson ordered his artillery men to fire, and for two days shells rained down on the town of 700 from the heights of what is now West Virginia.
NEWS
By JULIE E. GREENE | June 25, 2009
"Artillery hell. " That's what Confederate Col. Stephen D. Lee called Antietam Battlefield, according to Antietam National Battlefield's Web site. While most of the men who died from the Sept. 17, 1862, battle did so as a result of musket and rifle fire, one cannon shot could do far more damage than a single musket ball, Antietam Park Ranger Christie Stanczak said. Five hundred to 600 cannons were used by Union and Confederate forces during the battle. Visitors to the battlefield this Saturday will get to see an artillery demonstration, as will visitors to Fort Frederick State Park near Big Pool this Saturday and Sunday.
NEWS
by RICHARD F. BELISLE | August 25, 2004
waynesboro@herald-mail.com MARTINSBURG, W.Va. - Eugene Roman held out his hands Tuesday morning as U.S. Rep. Shelley Moore Capito handed him medal after medal, all earned by Roman 52 years ago when he served in the Korean War. Roman, 72, who lives in Shepherdstown, W.Va., was a forward observer in an artillery unit in Korea. He said he knew he was entitled to the medals when he was discharged from the Army in September 1952, but he never received them. Capito said Roman's daughter, Sheila Hamilton, who represents the Eastern Panhandle on the West Virginia Board of Education, contacted her in July about getting her father's belated medals.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 15, 2012
1. Historical smorgasbord Washington County Historical Society's new exhibit, "Potpourri - Treasures from the Attic," will include a little of this and a little of that -   a naval uniform from the Spanish-American War, a 1866 ball gown, 1834 hatbox, fraktur birth and baptismal announcements (shown), Native American pieces and ancient Egyptian lamps. Reception 1 to 3 p.m. Saturday, May 19, at Miller House Museum, 135 W. Washington St., Hagerstown. Exhibit continues through the end of June.
NEWS
August 27, 2005
Civil War re-enactments Summer of '62 Civil War re-enactments of the Battle of Cedar Mountain and the unfinished railroad cut portion of the Battle of Second Manassas. Today, 8 a.m. to 6 p.m., reopening at 9:30 p.m. for theatrical production; Sunday, 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. Monroe Road, Boonsboro. Admission is $5; free for ages 11 and younger. Call 301-432-0103 or go to www.wmhf.org/so62 . C&O Canal Days The weekend will include craft vendors, Civil War re-enactors and music performances.
NEWS
August 26, 2006
Mountain Stage NewSong Festival The event includes the Mountain Stage NewSong Contest, with registration today from 8 to 9 a.m., followed by performances from 9 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. at the War Memorial Building, and the International Finals from 7 to 9:30 p.m. at the Frank Creative Arts Center at Shepherd University. Also includes performances by Diana Jones, Todd Burge, Antje Duvekot, John Lilly, Devon Sproule and others. Today and Sunday. Various locations in and around Shepherdstown, W.Va.
NEWS
By ANDREW SCHOTZ | andrews@herald-mail.com | July 14, 2012
Some men who re-enact war have experienced it themselves, in Vietnam and Iraq. Some supporters from the sidelines are war veterans of decades ago, in Korea and World War II. “It's kind of a ghastly brotherhood,” said Tony Morgan of Falling Waters, W.Va., “but the brotherhood of war brings people together.” Whether veterans or not, re-enactors feel a commitment to telling the story of war like it is. That's what they set out...
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NEWS
By ANDREW SCHOTZ | andrews@herald-mail.com | July 14, 2012
Some men who re-enact war have experienced it themselves, in Vietnam and Iraq. Some supporters from the sidelines are war veterans of decades ago, in Korea and World War II. “It's kind of a ghastly brotherhood,” said Tony Morgan of Falling Waters, W.Va., “but the brotherhood of war brings people together.” Whether veterans or not, re-enactors feel a commitment to telling the story of war like it is. That's what they set out...
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 15, 2012
1. Historical smorgasbord Washington County Historical Society's new exhibit, "Potpourri - Treasures from the Attic," will include a little of this and a little of that -   a naval uniform from the Spanish-American War, a 1866 ball gown, 1834 hatbox, fraktur birth and baptismal announcements (shown), Native American pieces and ancient Egyptian lamps. Reception 1 to 3 p.m. Saturday, May 19, at Miller House Museum, 135 W. Washington St., Hagerstown. Exhibit continues through the end of June.
NEWS
By DON AINES | dona@herald-mail.com | January 5, 2012
One hundred and fifty years ago, Union and Confederate forces exchanged artillery fire across the Potomac River for two days, a battle being commemorated this week by the Town of Hancock. The events started Thursday night with a reading of students' essays on the battle and a Civil War concert, both held at the St. Thomas' Episcopal Church, 2 E. High St., Mayor Daniel Murphy said. Confederate Gen. Stonewall Jackson ordered the surrender of Hancock on Jan. 5, 1862, but the commander of the Union garrison, Brig.
OPINION
By TIM ROWLAND | timr@herald-mail.com | December 16, 2011
One hundred and fifty years ago on a mission to disrupt northern transportation, Stonewall Jackson ran into a troublesome spot by the name of Hancock, Md. He demanded the town surrender or else he would bomb it out of existence. Union men said he should feel free, since half the population were southern sympathizers anyway, and their demise would constitute no great heartbreak for the North. Without any good way to cross the Potomac River and make good on his threat, a frustrated Jackson ordered his artillery men to fire, and for two days shells rained down on the town of 700 from the heights of what is now West Virginia.
OPINION
August 4, 2011
Alexander Hamilton has probably had as much influence on the development of our nation as any of the founders who met in Philadelphia. Yet he is relatively obscure compared to James Madison, Benjamin Franklin or George Washington. When he is remembered, it is likely that he comes to mind because of his death as a result of the duel with Aaron Burr in 1804. Forest McDonald, in "Alexander Hamilton," gives ample reasons to rank Hamilton as a first-rate mind and an indispensable force in achieving the creation of a strong central government and a thriving industrial sector.
NEWS
By JAMES H. WARNER | July 20, 2009
Today, July 20, 2009, marks the 40th anniversary of the first moon landing by astronaut Neil Armstrong. Almost everyone who was alive at the time will remember the day. They will remember where they were and what they were doing when they heard the news. I, too, remember where I was and what I was doing on that day, However, I did not hear the news of the moon landing for several more years. I was a prisoner of war in North Vietnam and on July 20, 1969, I was in a small box that sat out in the sun in the third month of a prolonged interrogation about what the Communists were convinced was an escape attempt.
NEWS
By JULIE E. GREENE | June 25, 2009
"Artillery hell. " That's what Confederate Col. Stephen D. Lee called Antietam Battlefield, according to Antietam National Battlefield's Web site. While most of the men who died from the Sept. 17, 1862, battle did so as a result of musket and rifle fire, one cannon shot could do far more damage than a single musket ball, Antietam Park Ranger Christie Stanczak said. Five hundred to 600 cannons were used by Union and Confederate forces during the battle. Visitors to the battlefield this Saturday will get to see an artillery demonstration, as will visitors to Fort Frederick State Park near Big Pool this Saturday and Sunday.
NEWS
September 6, 2008
Professional wrestling MARTINSBURG, W.Va. - National Wrestling League of Hagerstown's Superior Pro Wrestling Training Center/House of Pain presents professional wrestling. 6 p.m. today autograph signing, followed by matches at 7:30 p.m. For the entire family. Apollo Civic Theater, 128 E. Martin St. Tickets cost $10 to $20. Tickets can be reserved in advance and paid for on the day of the event. For ticket reservations, call 301-739-3048 or 301-797-0627. For information, e-mail hqnwl@aol.
NEWS
By DAVE McMILLION | August 11, 2008
HARPERS FERRY, W.Va. - A cool breeze blew beneath towering trees at the top of Bolivar Heights Sunday and the views of nearby mountains were so vivid it seem they could be touched. A pleasant place to be on a hot summer day. But it was not such a nice place 146 years ago. That's when Confederate Gen. Thomas "Stonewall" Jackson oversaw the capture of 12,500 Union troops in the Civil War. On Sept. 15, 1862, a line of Union troops was stationed along Bolivar Heights, which is off Washington Street in Bolivar, W.Va.
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