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Appalachian Trail

NEWS
By DON AINES | dona@herald-mail.com | March 14, 2012
This year's 50th running of the JFK 50 Mile ultramarathon will still include a 13-mile section of the Appalachian National Scenic Trail, but organizers will look at ways to expand the field of entrants in future years while maintaining a limit of 1,000 runners on that portion of the course. The Cumberland Valley Athletic Club, which organizes the race, and the National Park Service reached an agreement last month to allow continued use of the trail for this year's race on Nov. 17 and in subsequent races, JFK co-Director Mike Spinnler said Monday.
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LIFESTYLE
March 14, 2012
The Potomac Valley Audubon Society invites hikers of all ages and abilities to join veteran trail hiker Dave Michener for a short hike up to Jefferson's Rock at Harpers Ferry on Sunday, March 25. Participants will meet at the Harpers Ferry train station at 9 a.m. Anyone with an interest is welcome. There is no fee for the hike but parking in the train station lot will cost $5. On the way back to the train station, the group will hike along part of the Appalachian Trail. This hike will be relatively easy but it will include some steep steps.
NEWS
By DON AINES | dona@herald-mail.com | March 13, 2012
This year's 50th running of the JFK 50 Mile ultramarathon will still include a 13-mile section of the Appalachian National Scenic Trail, and organizers will look at ways to expand the field of entrants in future years while maintaining a limit of 1,000 runners on that portion of the course. The Cumberland Valley Athletic Club, which organizes the race, and the National Park Service reached an agreement in early February to allow continued use of the trail on Nov. 17 and in subsequent races, JFK Co-Director Mike Spinnler said Monday.
NEWS
By RICHARD F. BELISLE | richardb@herald-mail.com | February 5, 2012
David Startzell's legacy as executive director of the Appalachian Trail Conservancy for 25 years was buying thousands of acres to protect the national scenic hiking trail, and get it off public roads and private property. “He brought us down from 200 miles (of public roads and private property) to six miles,” said Robert Almand, chairman of the ATC's 15-member board of directors. In the same breath, Almand cited the experience and skills of Mark Wenger of Williamsburg, Va., Startzell's successor.
OPINION
By TIM ROWLAND | December 10, 2011
As a hiker, climber and all-around mountain rat, I certainly understand concerns about trail conditions on public land. Thousands of feet on a hillside trample fragile root systems and open small fissures that are exploited by rainwater until a tiny break erodes into a major gash and then a virtual landslide, leaving the trail a horrible mess of rocks and exposed tree roots. Further, permits limiting mass access on environmentally sensitive public lands, including mountain trails, are the rule, not the exception.
OPINION
December 10, 2011
The JFK 50-Mile Ultramarathon is on the brink of its 50th year of existence. Celebrating President Kennedy's commitment to fitness, the event has brought thousands of runners to the hills and hollows of Washington County, including a 13-mile stretch on the Appalachian Trail, itself a venerable icon of outdoor activity. The race is historic in its own right, and has become part of the county's identity, much like the annual Salute to Independence at Antietam.  On a national scale, the same can be said for the Appalachian Trail.
NEWS
By ANDREW SCHOTZ | andrews@herald-mail.com | December 3, 2011
A dispute over whether the JFK 50 Mile ultramarathon will be allowed to continue using the Appalachian Trail and double the number of runners from 1,000 to 2,000 is escalating. After years of quiet battle, "it's time for the gloves to come off," JFK 50 Co-Director Tom Shantz said, referring to plans to pressure Appalachian National Scenic Trail Superintendent Pamela Underhill, who stands in the way. For this year's race, Shantz asked for permission to have 1,500 runners in the popular race through Washington County and was denied.
SPORTS
By ANDREW MASON | andrewm@herald-mail.com | November 19, 2011
Kathleen Luzier had a blast at the finish line at last year's JFK 50 Mile ultramarathon - helping out as a volunteer. “I loved it,” she said, “just seeing everyone's expressions.” She decided she had to give the race a try for herself. Luzier, 43, of Boonsboro, completed the JFK 50 on Saturday in 8 hours, 57 minutes, 49 seconds in her ultramarathon debut. Of the roughly 1,000 starter, she finished 197th overall, 32nd among females and - much to her surprise - first among all Washington County participants.
NEWS
By DAN DEARTH | dan.dearth@herald-mail.com | November 18, 2011
Editor's note: This is the final story in a five-part series about some of the people who will compete today in the JFK 50 Mile ultramarathon in Washington County. Brian Leach is returning to his roots for a dose of punishment. The 1988 graduate of St. Maria Goretti High School, who lives in Huntington Beach, Calif., was to arrive in Hagerstown a day before attempting to complete his first JFK 50 Mile. "It's something I've wanted to do for a couple of years," Leach said in a telephone interview.
NEWS
By ANDREW SCHOTZ | andrews@herald-mail.com | November 17, 2011
Editor's note: This is the fourth story in a five-part series about some of the people who will compete in the JFK 50 Mile ultramarathon Saturday in Washington County. Waylan Showe's approach to running long distances is far from regimented. A few years ago, he was so impressed with people who can run a 50-mile race in one day, he decided to try it himself. He had only run short distances, such as in gym class, but he wasn't intimidated. He signed up for the JFK 50 Mile and started running - whenever he could, however far he felt he could go that day. He didn't set a specific training schedule or goal.
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