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Appalachian Trail

NEWS
By DAVE McMILLION | davem@herald-mail.com | November 18, 2012
Dave Fox was basking Sunday in the success of being able to complete his 20th JFK 50 Mile ultramarathon on Saturday, putting him in the ranks of the event's 1,000-mile club. And although Fox said before the race that this would probably be his last annual running of the event, he was rethinking his plans Sunday, saying there are many things he would miss about not being in it every year. First-time JFK runner Mary Ellis, 63, of Keedysville, slipped on some wet leaves on a rock on the Appalachian trail and hurt her left knee when she fell.
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NEWS
By KAUSTUV BASU | kaustuv.basu@herald-mail.com | November 14, 2012
When Kathleen Luzier first went to the Appalachian Trail to prepare for the JFK 50 Mile, she didn't like it. The rocky and difficult terrain spooked her. Luzier, 44, who was the first Washington County resident to cross the finish line of the ultramarathon in 2011, has grown to like the trail. These days, she talks about its beauty. “You are in peace, even with 1,000 runners,” Luzier said. “It's maybe the closest to God you can be on this Earth.” The Boonsboro mother of three will be back on the trail Saturday hoping to improve on last year's performance, when she finished her first attempt at the race in just less than 9 hours.
NEWS
By JENNIFER FITCH | waynesboro@herald-mail.com | October 26, 2012
A movie that loosely references true crime on the Appalachian Trail will debut Saturday at the Capitol Theatre in Chambersburg. “It's definitely not a slasher movie, but it does revolve around murder and crime,” said Libby McDermott, the movie's director. “Dead Woman's Hollow” will play on the South Main Street theater's screen Saturday at 8 p.m. The story written by Indiana resident John Taylor follows an investigation into the murder of two girls who were hiking. “It's cool to have a film that was shot in Franklin County play in Franklin County,” said Matt Stahley, director of photography.
NEWS
By JENNIFER FITCH | waynesboro@herald-mail.com | October 25, 2012
A movie that loosely references true crime on the Appalachian Trail will debut Saturday at the Capitol Theatre in Chambersburg. “It's definitely not a slasher movie, but it does revolve around murder and crime,” said Libby McDermott, the movie's director. “Dead Woman's Hollow” will play on the South Main Street theater's screen Saturday at 8 p.m. The story written by Indiana resident John Taylor follows an investigation into the murder of two girls who were hiking. “It's cool to have a film that was shot in Franklin County play in Franklin County,” said Matt Stahley, director of photography.
NEWS
October 17, 2012
After volunteering their time at Tabitha's Table, handing out food and hygiene products to those in need, Scott and Angela Griffin wanted to do more. The Smithsburg couple decided to raise money for the organization by hiking 42 miles from Pen Mar Park in Cascade to Harpers Ferry, W.Va., along the Appalachian Trail. They begin their hike Saturday at 8 a.m., plan to sleep at Washington Monument State Park, and plan to end the hike Sunday at 4 p.m. To represent the cause, they are packing only half the normal amount of food.
LIFESTYLE
July 6, 2012
The Appalachian Trail Conservancy (ATC) will host Junior Ranger Day, an event from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday, July 21, at the Visitor Center at 799 Washington Street in Harpers Ferry. The event is designed to get families outside and active while learning about the A.T. near Harpers Ferry. Participants will visit the ATC's Visitor Center to pick up an Adventure Guide packet, a guide developed by the National Park Service and the ATC, to complete while hiking the Trail. Hikers will learn about the history of the A.T., trail maintenance, hike planning and the ATC's role in managing the trail.
OPINION
June 28, 2012
Keep Tryst Road resident supports rail trail To the editor: I live on Keep Tryst Road, in the former town of Weverton, at the southern terminus of the proposed Civil War Rail Trail.  Every household on my street recently signed a letter in support of this trail. First settled more than 200 years ago, the story of our street is one of historic grandeur eroded by time. A descendant of one of the original settlers, Jacob Miller, secured the charter for the Branch Railroad from Hagerstown to Weverton.
NEWS
By JENNIFER FITCH | waynesboro@herald-mail.com | June 17, 2012
Insurance and liability issues could create roadblocks in attempts to create a trail crossing Waynesboro Area School District property. Community, Fitness, Fun, Friends and Running, an organization of Waynesboro-area runners, received a $5,000 grant from Summit Endowment to create a trail connecting community parks, according to CFAR members. Some of the organization's representatives addressed the Waynesboro Area School Board last week about the trail. They want to clear a section of brush from behind Waynesboro Area Senior High School, then flatten that path and add wood chips for walkers and runners.
NEWS
May 11, 2012
A person who was reported missing on the Appalachian Trail at about 9:30 p.m. Thursday was found uninjured following a brief search, Franklin County (Pa.) Emergency Services said. The Blue Ridge Fire Department was called at 9:34 p.m. to help search for a missing person on the Appalachian Trail between Washington County, Md., and Old Route 16 Street near Blue Ridge Summit, Pa., according to an emergency services news release. Rescue workers were able to communicate with the man through a cellphone and were still trying to reach him at 11 p.m., a Washington County 911 spokeswoman said.
NEWS
April 22, 2012
The problem: While walking north on the Appalachian Trail, which leads under the U.S. 40 bridge over Interstate 70, Rose Nelson noticed the concrete on the underside of the bridge seemed to be deteriorating. “For the safety of the thousands who go under and over this bridge every day, this bridge needs to be looked at,” Nelson wrote in an email. “ I know I wouldnt appreciate debris falling on my car while I drive under it, that's for certain.” Who could fix it: Maryland State Highway Administration What they say: SHA spokesman David Buck said in an emailed response that “the deterioration of the underside of the deck is typical for a bridge of this age, and does not affect the ability of the bridge to carry all cars and trucks.” “It is structurally safe and sound,” Buck wrote.
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